2009 Nomad 1700 vs 2008 Yamaha Stratoliner [Archive] - Kawasaki Motorcycle Forums

2009 Nomad 1700 vs 2008 Yamaha Stratoliner

ndsailor
07-08-2010, 04:10 PM
I previously owned a 2007 1600 Nomad and absolutely loved it. I then sold that wonderful machine to move up, I thought, to the 2009 1700 Nomad. Well, after 11,000 miles on the 2009 1700 Nomad, I sold it and bought a 2008 Yamaha Stratoliner for the following reasons:

CONS of the Nomad 1700:
1. Cramped riding positon. While I found the stock seat the most comfortable on the market, I could not move my legs to a comfortable position over a long haul. It was like sitting bolt-upright in a lawn chair with your feet tied to the legs of the chair. Meanwhile, the floorboards on the 1700 LT are properly angled and about 3 more inches forward. Nice. Why couldn't they do that for the Nomad and Voyager? As an example, look at the foot position in the Kawasaki promo video, you have to sit duck footed and only use the forward 1/3 of the floorboard to even approach being comfortable. 2010 VulcanŽ 1700 Nomad

2. Engine heat. I have never riden a motorcycle, especially one that is liquid cooled, that put out this much heat. Even with the new remedy that Kawasaki provided.

3. Intermittant slow return to Idle or throttle stuck at high speed. The throttle never did work like it should, even after repeated visits to the dealer and talking with the Kawasaki technicians, they just couldn't fix the problem. You can hear it for yourself in the opening of the 2009 Kawasaki video. 2009 VulcanŽ 1700 Nomad and again in the 2010 verson at 2:08 into the video. Watch his wrist return to the idle position, but the throttle continues wide open. 2010 VulcanŽ 1700 Nomad (http://www.kawasaki.com/Products/Product-Specifications.aspx?scid=28&id=420)


4. Low top speed. I couldn't get the bike to top 92-95 mph. It had a higher top speed in 5th than in 6th.

5. Poor Gas Mileage. When new, she barely topped 28 mpg at highway speeds. After she was broke in ( after about 2500 miles) mileage improved to about 32-34 mpg on the highway.

6. I miss the hinged gas cap that the 1600s had.

PROS for the 1700 Nomad.
1. Very comfortable seats, especially for the passenger.

2. Air adjustable shock absorbers. Again, added comfort for the passenger.

3. Electronic Cruise Control. What more can I say.

4. Low rpm's at highway cruising speeds in Sixth gear, but trade off in acceleration, gas mileage and top speed.

5. Volumnous SaddleBags.

6. Nearly completely outfitted for touring, bags, windshield, engine and bag guards. It should come with a luggage rack to complete the outfitting.

7. Improved reach to the Handlebars. It was standard to get risers for the 1600 Nomad because of the long reach across the extended gas tank.

8. Ignition switch...you can remove the key and turn the engine on and off without it.

Stratoliner Cons:
1. Long reach to the handlebars. Had to get risers and narrower bars to boot.

2. Small fuel tank at 4.5 gallons. Although it gets as much mileage out of the 4.5 tank as the Nomad does with the 5.3 gallon tank.

3. Small saddle bags.

4. No engine guards, bag guards, or luggage rack, those are after market items.

5. Passenger comfort sucks....8 inch wide pillon with very little padding and no passenger floorboards, again...aftermarket items.

6. It is sometimes hard to get the key into the ignition, particularly if you add a fairing as I did. The fairing puts the ignition slot in the dark.

7. No cruise control. But even so, I don't miss it and I don't miss the 6-speed.

8. Harsh suspension. Again, aftermarket products will help, but it is an added cost.

Stratoliner Pros:
1. Smoothest running V-twin you will ever ride with excellent throttle response and tons of torque.

2. Ultra smooth shifting. I don't miss the 6-speed at all.

3. High top end. 120 mph+ and it takes no time at all to reach that speed.

4. Come standard with radial tires. The Nomad was advertised with radials but comes with biased ply tires.

6. Gas mileage 40-45 mpg on the highway (70-80 mph). Even better around town.

7. Lots of after-market parts to make it your own. (I guess this is a personal preferrance).

8. Leg room. I can move my legs either forward or back on the longboards.

9. Lower seat height. I can stand flat footed with a bend in my knees. Although I could get my feet flat on the street on the Nomad, my knees had to be almost locked straight.

Conclusions: NO MATTER WHAT BIKE YOU CHOOSE TO RIDE, THERE WILL ALWAYS BE SOME TRADEOFFS. You have to add alot to the Stratoliner to make it as complete as the Nomad for touring, but if the engine aint right, you aint got Sh**. I don't miss the cruise control because you need such a little twist of the throttle to reach highway speeds on the Stratoliner. Although the engine on the Stratoliner is air cooled, it runs MUCH cooler than the Nomad. With a shorter wheelbase, the Nomad handled better at slow speeds, but even this has been eliminated by adding a narrower handle bar to the Stratoliner. Still, that passenger comfort thing. Despite all its faults, I may have to return to the Nomad to keep touring with my wife. She has some bad discs in her back that become very painfull after a few hours on the Stratoliner, whereas we have toured throughout the mountains on 1500 mile trips on the Nomad without tiring. Just the danger of running up the back of a stopped car or truck if you don't watch the throttle closely.

Just my 85 cents

rbentnail
07-08-2010, 06:43 PM
I previously owned a 2007 1600 Nomad and absolutely loved it. I then sold that wonderful machine to move up, I thought, to the 2009 1700 Nomad. Well, after 11,000 miles on the 2009 1700 Nomad, I sold it and bought a 2008 Yamaha Stratoliner for the following reasons:

Can't say I blame you. Though I've not ridden either bike, just from sitting on them the Yami wins hands down. The 1700 was too top heavy and too cramped for my tastes. But if you liked the Kaw 1600 why not just get another one?

Slow Ride
07-11-2010, 01:50 PM
V2K, only thing I can throw out there.

ndsailor
07-12-2010, 09:01 AM
Thanks for the V2K suggestion., but I need the air suspension of the Nomad or Voyager for my touring partner. It'll work.

Matt7even
07-13-2010, 11:10 PM
Nice rundown sailor, and I think you touched on the hi-lightes of both models quite well. I love my Nomad for the type of riding I do but I would agree the floorboards could stand to be a little more forward witch is why I am putting the 1700 Classic ones on it ($130). Unforchunately I don't think they are any taller then my current floorboards so I will still be making sparks when it comes to riding the twisties. I like the Strats but I am more interested to see what Yamy will eventually replace the old Tour Deluxe with. Would be interesting to see a full cruiser with something like the new V-max mill.

ndsailor
07-14-2010, 09:21 AM
Nice rundown sailor, and I think you touched on the hi-lightes of both models quite well. I love my Nomad for the type of riding I do but I would agree the floorboards could stand to be a little more forward witch is why I am putting the 1700 Classic ones on it ($130). Unforchunately I don't think they are any taller then my current floorboards so I will still be making sparks when it comes to riding the twisties. I like the Strats but I am more interested to see what Yamy will eventually replace the old Tour Deluxe with. Would be interesting to see a full cruiser with something like the new V-max mill.

I didn't know you could just swap out the floorboards from the 1700 Classic with the Nomad. I was told by the dealer that the frame was slightly different.

Matt7even
07-14-2010, 10:49 AM
I don't know for ABSOLUTE sure that you can yet sailor but you bring up an interesting point. the main frame on both bikes ARE the same however the removeable downtube section witch the right floorboard assembly attaches too has different factory part #'s. It appears on the specs the difference has nothing to do with the foot control mounts but I will have to look more closely into it. The one trade off I AM aware of though is that the 1700 Classic mounts do not have mounting holes for the cruise control brake sensor switch. I may have to drill those myself but having the switch mounted isn't necessary to use the cruise control and I always use my hand lever to cancel it anyway. If I do decide to try and make the switch though I'll post it on here sometime.

P.S. The throttle problem you sited in your earlier post I kinda felt as well but only when the bike was running cold. Sounds like something was up with the one you had or maybe I am I've just gotten used to it now.

ndsailor
07-14-2010, 12:07 PM
I have the new 2010 Nomad in the garage now, waiting for the weather to clear to do some riding. But, even though I still am experiencing slightly slow return to idle, she still handles better than the Stratoliner even with the improvements I added -touring handlebar and risers. No big bike handles as well as the 1700 Nomad, but I knew that when I got rid of the 2009 Nomad.

Matt7even
07-14-2010, 03:46 PM
Ya know I road mine during lunch today and now that I am paying attention to it I am noticing the throttle stick a little more now. Maybe all those half seconds of extra throttling would explain the gas milage =). I'm a little surprised to hear you say the Nomad handles better then the Strat. The only real performance or handling gripe I had about my Nomad was the shallow lean angles compared to my 900 Vulcan but from what I am hearing it's a common trait with many of the other large touring cruisers as well. Either way I am happy for now but in the back of my mind I am still trying to figure out if there is a way to put a Strat engine into the Cross Country frame and so on, and so on =).

ndsailor
07-14-2010, 08:59 PM
Ah yes, the search for the perfect bike, a little from this bike, some from that. Yes, the Nomad does out handle the Stratoliner, but the Nomad does not come close to the Stratoliner in performance...especially the Strat's instant throttle response.

Linuxone66
08-23-2010, 09:26 AM
Yeah I too had a problem with my riding position on my 09 nomad, being 6'4" not many bikes let me stretch out just using floorboards, however with the aid of a set of kuryakin trident ISO foot-pegs with adjustable supports I now have about 5 different riding positions available.

As to most of the other stuff you have mentioned it seems that there is a lot of cost in getting the yammy up to par for touring. After traversing Australia twice on different bikes (swapping every so often) there will always be a nomad in my stables.

ndsailor
08-23-2010, 09:38 AM
Hey Matt, were you successful in mounting the 1700 Classic floorboards in the Nomad?

Matt7even
08-23-2010, 10:19 PM
No, I got stuck when I figured out you can't mount the Nomad Crash bars on the Classic floorboard mounts. Will probably end up getting the Kury floorboard mounted pegs instead.