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You haven't removed the valves and on the first picture, the bottom left valve looks like something is going on there. You have to remove the valves, make sure you mark which valve goes to which hole, and you may have to hand lap them back in. Some Dykem sprayed on there, of even a Sharpie pen, will show you where leakage is occurring when you spin the valve (by hand!), the ink well not all scrap off if there is a leak. In any event, with the head off, remove the valves, get some lapping compound, a suction cut on a stick and by hand, lap down the valves till you have a nice shiny seat that matches on the valve. Get al that carbon off everything. Polish the valves with rouge and the same with the top pf the pistons. You don't want to take off metal, you want them shiny. The cylinders have to come out, losing that much oil, if the bore is straight, you might get away with slapping in a new set of stock rings, if it is worn, then you will have to bore, get new pistons, to the next bore size. When I take an engine apart, I expect the worst, and I don't skimp on anything if I decide to put it back together. ;)
 

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That's leakage with absolutely no pressure. The top end has to com apart. The valves inspected, as the seats, to make sure they don't have any cracks. If you lap the valves back by hand, very easy to do, and since you just pull the valves in and out to see how the lapping is going, you get all the answer about your valves issues. I would remove the spring keepers, and valve springs, get a piece of cardboard, amd place each valve where they are supposed to g in that cardboard sheet, which will look like your cylinder as you are looking at it from the valve sides. It's a great feeling when they are all lapped back in, and you get the bike on the road, and really feel the uptake of power. You're on your way, just continue to continue. ;)
 

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PB is a penetrating oil, and will find leaks, that's good. These motorcycles do not have much horsepower. I think you could get away without the decompression apparatus. The bike only has 72 H.P., I doubt that decompression was even necessary. If it's all tuned up and running good, that starter will start that bike right up without decompression. As a previous poster stated, make sure the battery is up to stuff, as when it gets hotter, the motor will be tighter, a good battery will turn it right over, a weak one may not. Those valves need to be relaped, the interior of the cylinder head polished, and the top of the pistons cleaned, shiny is what you want. That carbon build up is indicative of a combustion chamber not burning fully and leaving behind carbon build up. I'd stop the testing, take it apart ahd fix it already, the testing is taking away from your riding time. It has to come apart, all the way apart (the top end, that is). It's obvious you have valve problems. :)
 

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That whole engine has to come apart. The reality hasn't struck him, but it's a two cylinder, and they really don't last as long as 4 cylinder bikes. Maybe the water cooled ones, but even then. I would bet with all the carbon build up on the pistons, a lot of that went on the cylinder walls, rings are probably full of it, and it needs a 1st over bore and pistons and rings to match, Then you have to plasti-gauge the main bearings, or whatever other method people use, and make sure from all the pounding that he doesn't need plain bearings also. If he doesn't know how to do this stuff, he could just slap in a new set of .std rings and hope foor the best. Maybe he can tolerate it burning 1/4 as much oil, and the 50 to 60 H.P. it would now produce. Do it right or look for a low mileage engine. Either way, it's going to cost you 2/3'rd's of what one in pristine condition would cost. These bikes don't fetch to much money used. A low mileage used motor might be a better deal, but you don't really know what your getting. I only keep motorcycles that I am deeply attached to and know that when the time comes, I will rebuild the engine. I have two cars like that, and three bikes, but two of the bikes will outlive me. I have to replace the cylinder head gasket on my motor home but that's a Chevy 454 c.i. big block with only 40K miles on it.
 

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Exactly what I expected to see. I would purchase new or in good condition, new valves, replace the valve stems, have the head professionally cleaned, and Zyglo tested for cracks. The whole head has to be rebuilt, and I can guarantee you the bottom end too. All that oil goes around the transmission, so you will need to look at that hard. If you could find a low mileage motor, that would probably be the best route to go. Personally, I would not put that much money into this bike, unless you find a drop in engine really cheap. They don't sell for much, you won't get your money back. It's a lost cause IMHO. I find these bikes low powered considering their displacement.

There's a 1500 engine on ebay for $1295, they have videos of the engine running in the bike. It's a 1500. Don't know that c.c.'s of yours, or if this one will drop in, but this would be cheaper than what you need to do to your engine on what you have found so far. There may be more. :)

Link = 2002-2003 Kawasaki MeanStreak Mean Streak VN1500 1500 ENGINE MOTOR TRANSMISSION | eBay
 

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The pistons are scored, and the bore matches right where the pistons scored the cylinder sleeves. New set of rings, if you could find real low mileage stock pistons, then hone the bores, you;d get better results. You have to check for play on the connecting rods, but that gets a big more difficult. If you have a dial indicator and a base that can be firmly mounted, you may be able to check for play in the direction of movement. If you're into working on engines, why not. You make a nice trike out of that. That engine and drive shaft will hook up to a solid rear car axle really easily. A little bit of tube manufacturing, or a beat rolling chassis, you could make a nice trike. :)
 

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I would go for 4 cylinders if adding a turbo. I like the trike Ian Rousell made on his show. It's a Rat Rod trike. I'd like to make this style bike, with thinner tires though and dual disc brakes, maube even an Earl's fork up front. I like this style, no fiberglass hanging all over the place. I don't like the color. He made this trike on his show, the whole thing, tank too, even used a Volkswagen Beetle Carb, and made an intake manifold for the Gold Wing 1100 engine. This bike really moves. All all metal too, no plastic or fiberglass. :)

 

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Rebuilding a motor is really a complex job. These days I would only rebuild a motor for a vehicle that had provenance. It had better be really special. This engine, IMHO, doesn't fall into that category. It's low horsepower, and large displacement baffle me. The retail used price of these bikes are low. The whole top end, pistons and all are shot. I would bet that the pounding for the V twin has taken out the rod bearings, and side thrust washers. You'll need all new crank bearings, and if you take a bike engine apart and don't do what needs to be done, you're just throwing your money away. If you have money to throw away, that's great. The top end is so damaged, it points to the bottom end really needing to come apart. In a worse case scenario, you take it apart, you have separated the metal, you'll get a lot more for the scrap value. I scrap metal all the time, Brass, and aluminum are getting a lot of money right now. :)
 

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It's always let the person decide. That's a given. A plain bearing motor has to be checked, you, as you know, and I mean "you" in genera;. can't just slap plain bearings in. The metal paticles that swirled around that motor no doubt took it toll. I purchased a 1964 230Sl Mercedes Benz 230 SL as the guy would not accept that the botom bottom end needed to come apart. I showed up with $8000 dollars in my pocket. He said a guy was going to come over to try and start it. I told him. "If anyone tries to turn that engine over, my offer goes away, I then pulled out $6000 dollars, and his wife yelled "Take the money, take the money!!". He took the money. I came later with a flat bed and took the $17,000 dollar car home. Only 400 were produced, it's estimated only 300 or less are still around. If this guy had let the Mercedes Benz dealership do the bottom end, he would have had his one owner (he purchased it new) $45K 230SL Benz to this day. The bottom end has to come apart. When he picked up the Mercedes from the dealership, it smoked like a Cumulus cloud coming out the rear end. Yes, I basically stole the car from the guy, but I knew beforehand what was going to have to be done, another $10K put into the car to finish it off, and get around $4 bucks on every dollar I put into it. I know how to rebuild those motors. I have rebuilt many. As I wrote earlier, if you really like working on engines, go for it, but do it right. He has so far. The bottom end has to come apart to clean the inside of the cases properly, and check the bearings properly. I only give advice to get the best results. To me time is money, not just parts. Looking at the condition of the cylinder heads, I wouldn't waste the $20 bucks and time. Taje it apart, clean, measure fix as necessary. He would end up with an engine he would have to break-in again.IMHO

I made a lot of money off of that car. I never finished it, just did some Tig welding on the aluminum doors. ;)

It looked just like this one, same color and removable drop top with convertible top underneath:

 
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