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Only 2,800 miles on my bike and now i am froced to get new tires since there is no threading at all. I don't burn out but i do top speed on the bike (130MPH) Anyways, I was looking at our service manual and that it requires size 130/70-17M/C 62H. for the rear. So i was wondering if i can use different sizes like to get more surfact area on to the road.

Also, anybody know the price for a Dunlop Tire? Anyone can price me shipped in this thread?
 

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Road Snot Needs A Kleenex
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Since I was the one that started that thread, I guess I'll chime in. I actually have ordered my new tires. I went with Pirelli Sport Demon in the factory sizes. Several reasons for this:
1) PSD are bias ply, which the rim is apparently "designed" for. However, they're about as radial oriented as a bias ply can be.
2) Stock size is what the bike is apparently "designed" for. So far, the only reason I've found to change to a wider tire is looks.

I did a lot of research on the issue and I know there are lots and LOTS of opinions about tire sizes, but for me, dealing with a new bike and new learning curve, the last thing I wanted to do was experiment with radials or larger sizes when it seems most of the 'experts' recommend sticking with stock construction and sizes. I did think about going with a 140/70 rear, but I couldn't bring myself to add weight and overall diameter simply to have tire that may look a little wider. I've taken the stock 130/70 all the way past the edge of the tire, so a wider tire would be nice, but so far even at extreme lean the (stock) tires still hold ok.

The reason I got new tires was because I got a nail in the rear at only a few hundred miles. Even though the tire has still never leaked at 1200 miles, I don't like the fact that it has been damaged. I didn't want to replace the 'moped' rear tire with another of the same, so I bit the bullet and replaced both front a rears. The next go around with tires, I will reconsider wider tires, but I feel better just sticking with what I think I know this time around.
 

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when I changed my tires to the plus sizing (120/70-150/60) I noticed a HUGE increase in steering, this bike becomes as nimble as it gets. with the slightly wider front tire you get tons of stopping power too. You also gotta remember the stock sizes and styles are a sport-touring compound, they last longer, but aren't nearly as sticky. The plus sizing tires are mostly super-sport tires, which you should get 6-7K miles out of, and they will give you traction throughout the entire thing.
 

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When you say increase in steering, what do you mean?

As far as nimleness goes, the smallish stock tires make the bike about as nimble as it gets. Smaller = more nimble.

If you go with a significantly wider tire than a rim is designed to carry, you aren't making the bike more nimble, you're making it more tipsy....by creating a wide "flat" spot in the center of the tire with steeper curves into the sidewall, so when you begin to lean the bike, the bike actually goes over easier, some call it falling. However, this doesn't create a stable or safe condition, potentially lessening the contact patch than even with the smaller tire and making the bike want to lean farther than the turn warrants.

All of this is just what I've gleamed off the web - i'm still a noobie (hence, I could be quite wrong), but I try to learn fast. The web is full of information about tire vs. rim width. This article http://www.sportrider.com/tech/tires/146_0206_size/ in particular helped make my decision, but there are a lot of similar reviews on the web.
 

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The way the tire fits on the rim the profile you get is the same contact area size as the stock ones, you just have a lot more tire to lean onto. On the front you have a much more common sized tire. And for good reason, the 120/70 makes initiating turns much faster. Compared to the stock setup my bike is 10x as nimble IMHO.
 

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So with the wider, stickier front and rears you turn more nimbly? But can you hold the same lines at higher speeds? You don't have any issues with losing grip in the middle of a turn? Which tire size is easier to wear all the way to the edges? (in other language-do wider tires require more leaning to get them to wear all the way to the edge?) What tire pressures do you run at, the recommended Kawasaki pressures or the maximum pressure listed on the tires?

I'm very interested in finding out the answers to these questions. I recently replace the stock rear after 3K with the same size Bridgestone BT45 (all I could find on short notice, I had a ride coming up and didn't have time to order any tires I wanted). It seems the BT45 perfoms better than the stock Bridgestone, but I'd like to go wider on the next set with some Pirellis.
 

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yes, much more nimble. I hold a tighter more accurate line, and I hold it solidly. Its very hard to lose traction on these tires. The stock ones feel like they are covered in grease compared to these. It is easier to get to the edge of the tire on the 130, but thats because the edge is at a much less lean angle. I lean less to turn than I did with the stock tires on there too.

I run the stock air pressure, 36psi rear and 32psi front. Running the max psi will toast your tires.

I also have gotten about 1500 miles out of the diablos with only a slight showing of wear in the back, and no wear in the front. I figure I can get 4500 out of the rear before its fried (with no track days that is).
 

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I just ordered a new rear Pirelli Sport Demon in stock size. My stock tire is gone after only 7000km (4300miles). From my experience the rear tires can make 1 average season, the fronts 2 season. If you change your chain in time (about every season), you will never have to change your sprockets.
 

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I just had my Sport Demons installed this weekend - stock sizes. Was only able to put about 20 miles on them, so I can't really review them yet (other than looks and they look great). I do notice a difference in the way the bike responds to the rode and my input. Lean-over is more smooth and solid. Straight-line feels "stickier" with less wander and takes a tad more effort to turn wheel at low speeds. Will know more in a few weeks, but so far very happy with them, if for looks alone. They look like a sport bike radial.
 
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