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Hello again, I've been making good progress with the bike and it's running now. But I've stumbled upon a new issue; The clutch will not disengage. For background, I just picked up the bike last week and it's my first bike.

I know the bike has sat untouched for a minimum of 3 years, but I'm certain it's been much, much longer than that. When I got the bike it had no gear oil in the transmission. I believe it has leaked out from around the shaft for gear change lever. I pulled out the clutch actuator pin/rod and it has some slight bends in it... I'm thinking someone has been whaling on it with a hammer trying to unstick the clutch. Also, the screws for the cover plate that holds the actuator are nearly striped which tells me it's been off and on a number of times.

For gear oil, I've since added Rotella T4 15w40. I've tried a number of things to unstick the clutch. Some taps on the end of the clutch pin with a rubber mallet. Rocking the bike back and forth while in gear just wants to turn the engine over. I've tried multiple tension settings on the clutch cable. I've tried rolling the bike and then kicking it into gear...that just locks up the rear tire. The last trick I know of is to put the front tire against a wall, rev it up and drop it into 1st... but I'm hesitant to try that in case something breaks. I'm thinking the clutch pack might very well be rusted/stuck together since it's sat for so long without oil in it.

I've seen it suggested to put diesel fuel into the gearbox and let it sit, as well as type-F ATF is supposed to help as well... thoughts? The absolute last thing I want to do is open up that engine, but I'm starting to think that's my only option.

Any other tricks to freeing up the clutch? Thanks in advance
 

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I have had this happen on a number of bikes that have been stored for too long (even with full oil levels).
What I do is get it running in neutral and while rolling down a hill, pop it into first or 2nd gear and then while riding the bike, snap the clutch lever in and out with varying amounts of throttle. You can also apply the brakes with the clutch pulled in. In most cases this has worked for me, but sometimes you just have to bite the bullet and tear it apart. If you suspect a lot of rust, this is likely the best approach as the rust will wear out your friction plates pretty quickly.
 

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Sometimes you can engage the clutch and use a clamp to hold the clutch lever in and if you’re lucky, you can see the clutch plates through the transmission filler hole. Try using a flat screwdriver through this opening to pry the plates apart.
 
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