Kawasaki Motorcycle Forums banner
1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
1981 Kawasaki CSR1000
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, so I bought this bike for 1500. The guy I bought it from sold it for his kid, and seemed to run fine. Rode it home, rough idle, figured it was the pods installed. Ordered a stock airbox off ebay, installed it, fires up and at low rpm I notice a "clanking" sound. Figured it was just an old bike, took it for a ride. At the first light I get to, it's idling at 3k rpm. Well that's not right. Anyways, take the next right, hit a bump, it dies. Battery dies trying to get it to fire. Put a new one in and no fire. Pull #1plug, no spark. Ignition seems new, new NGK wires, new plugs. So I pull the side panel, and find a bare ground wire coming from the ignition box, through the connector to where it meets the regulator/rectifier. I'm worried that I'll replace the RR and the ignition box and still have a lemon. I mean parts are on the way.. Any help is much appreciated!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,710 Posts
Well, it is an old bike and as such you should expect to have to give it some TLC. But it will get costly if you replace parts without first determining if they are bad. I only say that because it appears you have ordered parts because of a bare wire? Perhaps you are leaving out details of your troubleshooting, but if you want help, then you need to tell us everything you did or did not do, otherwise we end up wasting a lot of time and some folks will just give up.

Your high idle is likely a vacuum leak. Check all rubber ducts and clamps to make sure air cannot get sucked into the engine. Since you have ordered parts, we might as well wait on the ignition issues until you have the new parts.

Keep your new battery charged while you wait. Please provide us with as much detail as possible. Oh yeah, photos are highly recommended. Show us the bare wire.

And last but not least.... Welcome to the forums!
 

·
Registered
1981 Kawasaki CSR1000
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Okay so amateur hour on my part with the thread lol as well as my mechanical skills but I've got the service manual for the bike. I'll post pictures asap.. I did expect to put some work into it, but after reading posts on here, thought I may have a greater issue.

Put vacuume lines on it that were missing because of the pod set-up. I went back to the stock airbox.

As far as the bare wire. Found it to be a ground, yellow and black wire, coming from the ignition box. It ties into the rectifier ground, which eventually grounds everything (ie: wiring diagram). So I took it apart, ordered a new ignition box and rectifier, thinking maybe it was getting too much voltage.

Plan on buying a voltage meter soon, like I said I'm an amateur lol

Thank you for all the information. I'll update this post as soon as I can.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,710 Posts
No worries, there is a lot of talent on this site and I am confident we can help you get your bike sorted. Going back to the stock airbox was a wise decision IMHO. Also it is great that you have sourced a service manual.

If the bare wire was melted then that is cause for concern. We await the pictures and updates.
 

·
Obfuscation Engineer
Joined
·
6,704 Posts
It's okay , I'm still here, kinda.
If you can't find me here I'm not that hard to find.
It will take some work and patience. It may even take a few dollars.
It's worth it.
find and read "carburetors from the grave."
Find and read Mike Folks carb 101
The stock coils are crap.
The pickup coils are suspect.
It probably hasn't had a valve adjust since Slick Willie was president.

That should keep you busy for a while :)
 

·
Registered
1981 Kawasaki CSR1000
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Got to do some tinkering today. Got my wire issue taken care of. Now you can see why I ordered a new cdi box lol. Anyways.. so I figured why not go ahead and check the valves while I've got the thing stripped. Probably get new coils because these are old, plug wire #4 ripped. That could have been a problem.. anyways turns out I have zero clearance an all valves. Yay lol. Bought a multimeter for when parts get here!
42938
42939
42940
42941
42942
42943
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,710 Posts
It's bad, but I have seen worse. When I see wiring like that, I start to question the accuracy of the wiring. Wherever you see signs of a "repair" or non-oem wire, I would trace it out with the factory wiring diagram to make sure it is correct.

Burnt and overheated wires can be due to any one, or a combination of:
1. Faulty regulator
2. Corroded connections
3. Someone installing an oversize fuse.
4. Someone installing a higher wattage headlight bulb or added too many accessories.

I would examine all of your connections carefully. New OEM style connectors are available from third party suppliers.
Pay particular attention to all wires and connectors from the alternator all the way to the regulator. If any of the wire insulation has hardened from heat, the wires should be replaced. Usually the three yellow wires from the alternator are fine until they meet with the first connector, and its all downhill from there. Best of luck. With PPM (patience, perseverance and money) you will have this baby back on the road.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
218 Posts
Don't feel bad about the lemon, I did the same and found similar low information repairs and lack of maintenance. Keep at it, at least once it's running you'll feel smarter.

Edit: it's a classic and if mine would drop the engjne and go into a frame up restoration including rings and valve job.
 

·
Obfuscation Engineer
Joined
·
6,704 Posts
Just open the dyno cover and look for barbecue .
Number one cause of stator meltdown is a limp battery.
Number two cause of stator meltdown is a bad ground.
 

·
In my own little world
Joined
·
31 Posts
I've dealt with electrical issues VERY SIMILAR on my '95 KZ1000P.
1. Follow the wiring from the molex plugs:
*(3 yellows) back to the stator. Usually fried at connection points and inside cover. Not too bad to replace
*Rectifier/regulator- both in from stator and out to rec/reg -The molex plugs melt letting leads contact, especially the out (12v) to the battery with ground=dead short. Red molex pics

Get new connectors, leads. For me, it was easiest solution to rebuild these. My rec/reg was fine.....stator died from wires being crispy near stator.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
1981 Kawasaki CSR1000
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
update
I got the valves adjusted. Cdi box and rectifier replaced. Below is a video. I don't like the clanking sound I hear at low rpm like I was talking about before. It's running rich as hell; I know because I can't breathe it's so strong lol. Anyways.. does anyone have any idea why it runs so rough? I mean it sounds like the crankshaft is about to hop out of this thing! Thanks
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,710 Posts
Wow, that is noisy! Any chance you got the valves too loose? Do you have any compression numbers?
Did you do an oil change? What is oil level and what oil did you use? Did you save the old oil filter?
 

·
Registered
1981 Kawasaki CSR1000
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
No chance in hell lol.. they are within spec.. Yes I changed the oil, and filter. I do have the old one still. I put Castrol 10w-30 in it. Filled it to half on the sight glass. When I started it, the level went down, refilled to half on sight glass again. I haven't bought a compression tester yet. Feeling kind of defeated..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,809 Posts
That sounds like it's only running on 2 or 3 cylinders.
Wait for the Engine to go cold, Start it up and immediately touch each down pipe real quick so you don't burn yourself and see if any remain cold.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,710 Posts
Sorry, but I had to ask.

A post-mortem on the filter could speak to the problem. If you can open it without producing any metal chips, dust or filings, that will allow you to examine the paper element for signs of metal that came from your engine. They actually make a tool for cutting open oil filters without any contamination. It works like a plumber's pipe cutter but some folks will use a chisel and tin snips.

While typing this I saw Greenisbest's response. I like that idea. Quick and at zero cost. Try that first. Also hold your hands near the muffler exits to see if you can sense a difference in pressure and temperature from left to right.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,809 Posts
They actually make a tool for cutting open oil filters without any contamination. It works like a plumber's pipe cutter but some folks will use a chisel and tin snips.
Well I never knew that, Dam I'll have to have a look see if I can add one to the Toy list, More Money :giggle:
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
Top