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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was looking at a 1981 silver KZ1000J in totally stock condition. It has about 10K with new tires and is ready to go. He's had the bike for about 15 years. It isn't a museum piece, but is in nice shape. Very firm on the price at $3K. Any comments?
 

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Navy Vet Search & Rescue
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Personally, I think it's overpriced. Of course I don't know what sort of condition it is in. How would you compare it to my 81 (photos in sig link)? I've redone mine from the frame up (powdercoated frame, oil cooler, refurbished the gauges, lined the tank, replaced exhaust, new - paint / battery / grips / mirrors / bars / front master cylinder / ss brake lines / swingarm and steering stem bearings / petcock / horns / 530 sprockets n chain. Not that I would sell mine but even after doing all that and more I think I would be lucky to get 3k for it even if I waited until spring.

P.S. Check ebay for similar bikes and see what they sell for.
 

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Depends on what else is available in your area. If I have a choice between of that and lets say a late 90's Concours for the same price I'd be in a pickle, lean towards the Connie. $3K in my neighborhood gets me a lot to look at. But that is me.

Does the bike make you smile every time you think about it?
 

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Obfuscation Engineer
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Depends on what else is available in your area. If I have a choice between of that and lets say a late 90's Concours for the same price I'd be in a pickle, lean towards the Connie. $3K in my neighborhood gets me a lot to look at. But that is me.

Does the bike make you smile every time you think about it?
Couldn't agree more . "Does the bike make you smile every time you think about it?". more than anything else this one thing becomes the deciding factor . Some info for you though .
I haven't met a Gen III aircooler that did not eat it's intakes before 40kmi . Although one of the easiest head R&Rs in the game having to replace valves before 50-60k is a bit of nonsense . The bores are hard in the extreme and hard on pistons and rings . I've used two sets of rings on the stock pistons and two sets of rings on the replacement pistons on my way to 100k with the bore still within limits although noticeably tapered . These bikes smoke a bit and even if they don't they use oil , just a fact of design and operation .
The charging system is suspect only for the use of a marginal stator . I've owned at least one of the 998/1100 engines for the last 27 years and will continue to . It's just a matter of preference . $3K ? a bit much I think as the 0mi ebay bike earlier this year went for $6k and I see good examples around here for no more than $2,500 . I still have to go back to "Does the bike make you smile every time you think about it?". Walk into this possible purchase with the eventual cost of ownership in mind as well as the other possibilities for the price .

~kop
 

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Agreed. 3000$ is too much. Sounds like a 2000 $ bike for a fair deal. Some of us Kawasaki nuts keep the prices up, but really, for the average dude, these are just old bikes that don't look right to the younger generation. I only buy good deals, because the need to ride is already taken care of by the fleet. So one more in the stable needs to be a deal.
 

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Eddie Lawson is God!
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Now, I'm going to chime in. The KZ1000P (Police) was made until 2005 or so. so mechanical parts are available. That motor was very popular with drag racers, so High Performance parts are readily available. The electrical system is weak (not as bad as a Suzuki GS1100 which is JUNK) It has many variants (LTD, GPz1100, Shaft) so retrofit/upgrade possibilities abound. It won't die because you can't get a camchain tensioner like a CB1100F. And the J isn't bad to ride. And, it was the base model of one of the three bikes I care about.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I appreciate all your help and I learned a few things. I e-mailed him saying I was going to pass and stated I'm sure someone will step up. He got right back to me and said he sold it this morning to a collector.
 

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For an electrical up grade, ElectroSport Industries - Motorcycle, Dirt Bike and ATV Aftermarket Electrical Parts has over wound stators that have a higher output at lower rpm's than what came with the bike.
_________________________________________________________________

Alternator Stator Replacement On the Older 4’s

Source for replacement Stators
A. ElectroSport Industries - Motorcycle, Dirt Bike and ATV Aftermarket Electrical Parts (They have a trouble shooting page)
B. Custom Rewind -- High Quility Remanufactured Motorsports Electronics, Rotors, Stators, Ignition Systems
C. www.rmstator.com
D. ricksmotorsportselectrics.com
E. www.regulatorrectifier.com

1. If by testing either by checking the output voltage from the stator or by using and ohmmeter for resistance and the stator is determined to be bad, replacing the stator is not a difficult job.

2. The motorcycle owner should have on hand a replacement alternator gasket as it will tear on removal and leak if reused.

3. Put the bike on the center stand if possible and lean it to the right to minimize the oil volume that could come out when the alternator cover is removed.

4. Have selection of Metric wrenches and sockets along with Metric Allen keys to be able to accomplish this repair. ¼” and 3/8” ratchets and extensions may be needed along with Allen bits.

5. Remove the gear shift lever, the sprocket cover and possibly the left foot peg assembly.

6. A catch pan for what little oil will be lost should be positioned under the alternator on the left side. Newspapers will soak up any oil lost or some kitty litter will do as an absorbent.

7. Remove the alternator cover fasteners, some bikes use a socket head cap screw(Allen type) and others use the Phillips head type, the #3 screwdriver bit fits best for those. Use a small dish or can to collect the removed fasteners from the parts to prevent loss/damage.

8. The alternator stator is secured to the inside of the cover usually with three Allen headed bolts, Some bikes may have Torx style fasteners, Remove them and disconnect the three yellow wires that have bullet connectors on them from the bundled wires inside the sprocket cover.

9. If your bike has some color other than yellow for the alternator output wires, make note of what goes where as the older Kawasaki’s were phase sensitive in regard to the regulator/rectifiers.

10. When installing the replacement stator, clock or position the output wires and grommet so they fit into the small port under the alternator cover without being pinched or damaged.

11. Tighten the three Allen or Torx fasteners, securing the replacement stator to the cover. I like using the BLUE Loctite # 242 for hardware that can be removed with hand tools.

12. Remove the old gasket from the mating surfaces of the alternator cover and engine case by scraping with a piece of sharpened plastic like Lexan or Plexiglass as these will not gouge the soft Aluminum
Cases. Avoid using a metal gasket scraper for this.

13. Position the alternator cover, checking for pinched wiring and install the fasteners with a little silver anti-seize on the threads, tightening to the correct torque.

14. Connect up the output wires to the mating female bullet connectors and while you’re in there, check the routing of the wire bundle that runs through there.

15. Inspect for signs of heat damage to the wire insulation and vibration damage too.

16. The side stand switch, neutral switch, and oil pressure switch wiring are all bundled with the alternator output wiring running above and behind the engine output sprocket. This bundle runs in a channel as it goes up toward the various electrical connections.

17. The regulator/rectifier plug on the 80’s bikes usually has six wires in it:

A. One WHITE with RED stripe, this is the bikes main power wire usually 12 gauge in size.

B. One smaller Brown wire, probably 18 gauge or so, the voltage sense wire for the regulator/rectifier, helps keeping it from overcharging the battery.

C. One BLACK with YELLOW stripe wire, part of the ground circuits, maybe 16 gauge in size.

D. Three YELLOW wires, the alternator output wires going to the regulator/rectifier which converts the Alternating Current(A.C.) to Direct Current(D.C.) using rectification, producing the power to run the motorcycle and charge the battery.

18. Reinstall the sprocket cover, again checking for pinched wires before tightening. Install the shifter on it’s splined shaft checking for proper location, and the left side foot peg assembly.

19. Except for the minor oil spill and reluctant fasteners, it’s not a very difficult job to do.
 

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Hard to judge without a picture. I've been looking around and these bikes seem tough to find in decent stock condition I think with relatively low miles. Not impossible though, deals certainly happen, so just got to be patient and keep looking. Might be worth the 3k price if you really need the bike now, and want to ride right away since it's in great running condition. Usually the good deals on these bikes require some work I think.
 
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