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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
I touched the main relay and another relay for the dfi and the fuel pump to see if I can feel or listen the click on, off, on.
It is difficult to feel if it is from on/off or just a vibration.

If the relays are bad, what made them bad?
 

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You probably need a new R/R. At 4,000 RPM you should see at least 14 volts at the battery. 12.5 is not enough.
This may not be the cause of your issues, but it is a problem and you might as well fix it and see if that cures your issue.

Did you have your meter set to measure AC voltage when you tested alternator output and did you test output on all 3 leads?
 

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Ok if a new R/R did not raise your battery charging voltage then you have alternator problems, or a wiring problem between alternator and R/R and battery. I cannot think of any other reason why you are not getting charging voltage at battery.
 

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So, this is where not being there makes diagnostics especially difficult.
I know you're describing the problem(s) the best you can, and you've been a good sport in trying different diagnostics, but right now, I haven't a clue what's wrong with it!

That said, here's a another idea: let's try to determine what's causing the "disruption" in the way it runs by looking at the effect on spark. Using either a spark tester or a clamp-on timing light (using a remote battery source), or both, see what the spark looks like when the engine runs poorly. If the spark is good and constant, then it suggests a problem with the TFI system; If the spark is getting "flippy" then it's something to do with ignition.
 

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Check the impedance of each stator winding. I think your stator is bad, especially if changing the R/R did nothing, except maybe cook the new R/R you put in. Always use meters, they are isolated from what you are checking and unaffected by the object you are testing. That's how they screwed up the Hubble telescope, they relied on the company making it to test the lens, and the company made a jig that gave them the results they wanted.

With the readings you are getting off of your stator, it seems your problems is in the Stator as WFO-KZ says.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Ok if a new R/R did not raise your battery charging voltage then you have alternator problems, or a wiring problem between alternator and R/R and battery. I cannot think of any other reason why you are not getting charging voltage at battery.
Which do you recommend to refresh first? Alternator or wiring?
 

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This is ground ststor ground to stator wire end? The voltage is way too high. I don't how your stator could possible be putting out so much voltage. I am assuming you are measuring this disconnected from the R/R? Still, it seems that the stator should not be producing so many volts and then heave to bleed them off as heat, it doesn't make sense. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
This is ground ststor ground to stator wire end? The voltage is way too high. I don't how your stator could possible be putting out so much voltage. I am assuming you are measuring this disconnected from the R/R? Still, it seems that the stator should not be producing so many volts and then heave to bleed them off as heat, it doesn't make sense. :)
I read one yellow wire and another yellow wire from stator.
 

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You have to read the end of the stator wire and connect the other lead to ground, not another stator wire. You are running the stator in series and doubling the voltage. One end to ground, one end to the Yellow end. :)
 

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This is from a Versys forum. Label your stator wires A-B-C. Use your idle adjustment so the bike runs at 2000 RPM and is steady without touching your throttle. Take ac voltage readings A to B, B to C, And C to A. this is the three output combinations from the stator. All three of the voltages should be within 0.5 volts ac of each other. At 2000 RPM you are somewhere near 25% output of the stator. Small defects will be easier to see than at max output. If the difference is more than 0.5 v then there is a shorted winding in the stator. The reading should be around 24 to 28 v

Next is A to ground, B to ground, and C to ground. You should get around 17v and be no more that 1 v difference. This is to test shorts of windings to ground.
 

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This statement makes no sense..."this is the three output combinations from the stator. " If it's a combination, then how could he tell the difference of each lead? The test you are describing is the static test. He was doing the dynamic test.

Use this video to guide you through the Dynamic test:
(same guy in the video WFO-KZ posted)

Same guy, by the way. Folllow all the steps, and you will find out if your Stator is good or bad. If it is good, don't hook that R/R up to it, if you do, do it only long enough with and check the +/- side of that connector. That will tell you if it has rectified the voltage, and how much voltage is coming out of the Stator. If you do not get a 13.8 voltage reading out of the R/R, it is shot. :)
 
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