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Hey all, I recently got myself into quite a pickle. I purchased two (Titled) GPZ750's for the low low price of $200.
Thats good, I've got one new tank and one complete fairing set, and cowl! Engines aren't locked and the main stuff is there!
Bad news: I've got no functional harness, the carburetor rack I have is bad, no remaining electronics except a small collection of water-logged instruments i.e. gas meter, speedometer, ignition box.

I rigged some stuff up to a battery, I got the starter to spin, as well as the entire bike, but I wasn't able to get any spark, even though I had power to the coils.

Few questions.
are the $400+ aftermarket ignition systems capable of functioning without the OEM harness?
are the "Custom" wire harnesses offered by JP cycles worth it?
is it better to part these things out on ebay than rebuild?
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1983 GPz 750, green
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Hey Hightower I have 4 Gpz 750 unitrack models. I rebuilt them from basically scrap as a hobby. I like the bikes but don't need 4 of them. When I tried to sell one of them there are no buyers anywhere. Any offer I got was not even half of what it cost me to rebuild them. So no sale. I think what it comes down to is that there are better bikes out there for less money. If you are going to part them out, I need a complete gas tank and a center stand for very low cost. The GPz 750 is a well made bike, fun to ride, and easy to repair. Why people don't like them is a mystery to me. For me wiring and engine work is no big deal just takes time, a really good paint job is the most expensive part of a re-do. But who knows maybe someday they will be wanted again. Best o luck.
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Discussion Starter #3
Hey Hightower I have 4 Gpz 750 unitrack models. I rebuilt them from basically scrap as a hobby. I like the bikes but don't need 4 of them. When I tried to sell one of them there are no buyers anywhere. Any offer I got was not even half of what it cost me to rebuild them. So no sale. I think what it comes down to is that there are better bikes out there for less money. If you are going to part them out, I need a complete gas tank and a center stand for very low cost. The GPz 750 is a well made bike, fun to ride, and easy to repair. Why people don't like them is a mystery to me. For me wiring and engine work is no big deal just takes time, a really good paint job is the most expensive part of a re-do. But who knows maybe someday they will be wanted again. Best o luck. View attachment 42307 View attachment 42308 View attachment 42309
Very nice looking collection, im thinking ill 100% tear down the red 84. Work out all the rest of the bike, engine last
 

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Hey Alex_GPz, what's the story on the rear tire on the green bike? Doing a little off roading?
 

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1983 GPz 750, green
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I bought that green bike as basically junk and thought I'd turn it into a rat bike for gravel roads. So got some knobby tires for it. Then it looked so good after all my work decided to leave the knobbies on. Runs great and I like the looks. If a person wants to rebuild an old bike look at the costs for things like: tires, brakes, filters, oils/fluids, seals, rubbers, valve job, cables, carb kits, plugs and wires, broken parts, and general clean up. Never mind all the labour and painting and you just spent $2500 or more for a 37 year old bike. Add in a decent paint job and even if you got the bike for $200 no one is willing to pay even $3000 for it and you just spent probably $4000 or more. Realistically for me its a labour of love only, the economics just don't work anymore. Look around and see what kind of bike you can buy for $4000.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I bought that green bike as basically junk and thought I'd turn it into a rat bike for gravel roads. So got some knobby tires for it. Then it looked so good after all my work decided to leave the knobbies on. Runs great and I like the looks. If a person wants to rebuild an old bike look at the costs for things like: tires, brakes, filters, oils/fluids, seals, rubbers, valve job, cables, carb kits, plugs and wires, broken parts, and general clean up. Never mind all the labour and painting and you just spent $2500 or more for a 37 year old bike. Add in a decent paint job and even if you got the bike for $200 no one is willing to pay even $3000 for it and you just spent probably $4000 or more. Realistically for me its a labour of love only, the economics just don't work anymore. Look around and see what kind of bike you can buy for $4000.
I've got a '91 FXR. I dont need any more bikes.
I bought these because they were cheap, $100 each. Id never go out and actually spend 4k on a motorcycle, or $1500 for that matter.
I'm in it for the building experience at this point.
 

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1983 GPz 750, green
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I'm at the point where I've got plenty of building experience. Nice thing is that with all the same or very similar bikes I get to know just about every part on them. I'm rebuilding a friends 1980 KZ750 LTD H for some cash. Easy job because I can do it very quickly and efficiently. The KZ engine is a real work horse and fairly simple to work on. Kawasaki makes some **** fine motorcycles/engines IMO. The GPz 750 was one of them.
 

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Totally agree with you Alex. I just finished (well, are you ever really finished?) restoring an 84 ZN1100 and I could not believe how much it ended up costing and I have not painted it yet. It seems that a super low purchase price does not help much. An old bike is going to need a lot of work and a lot of new parts. The benefit I got out of it was the joy of learning new things and the pride in rescuing a vintage bike that otherwise would have ended up as junk.
 

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1983 GPz 750, green
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One aspect that seldom gets mentioned about motorcycles is this; so you want a motorcycle but know nothing about mechanics, wiring, or riding. Would anyone really feel secure riding a 'rocket' that they knew nothing about? Not knowing if the chain is going to break when you are doing 140 kph? Or a worse incident? Special tools that you don't have, going in for expensive service for simple things. Overly complex engines that put out hundreds of horse power that only highly trained mechanics with all the speacial tools can work on? To me a motorcycle was always about cheap, low cost and fun transportation. That seems to be mostly gone now, gotta have 1500cc engines or even bigger, traction/ABS control, fuel injection, tires you cant change without a machine, etc. Anything older than year 2000 are nice to look at antiques now. Nostalgic art from a bygone era. So I choose to keep a few just to look at and ride from time to time. Running on empty, only a few more miles to go come wind come weather and boy my legs are getting cold and the road is getting worse all the time, getting dark too....
 

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Discussion Starter #10
One aspect that seldom gets mentioned about motorcycles is this; so you want a motorcycle but know nothing about mechanics, wiring, or riding. Would anyone really feel secure riding a 'rocket' that they knew nothing about? Not knowing if the chain is going to break when you are doing 140 kph? Or a worse incident? Special tools that you don't have, going in for expensive service for simple things. Overly complex engines that put out hundreds of horse power that only highly trained mechanics with all the speacial tools can work on? To me a motorcycle was always about cheap, low cost and fun transportation. That seems to be mostly gone now, gotta have 1500cc engines or even bigger, traction/ABS control, fuel injection, tires you cant change without a machine, etc. Anything older than year 2000 are nice to look at antiques now. Nostalgic art from a bygone era. So I choose to keep a few just to look at and ride from time to time. Running on empty, only a few more miles to go come wind come weather and boy my legs are getting cold and the road is getting worse all the time, getting dark too....
I'm not sure why you're getting this deep into it, I rebuilt a Yamaha Xs650 that I bought for $150. I wanted another project.
 

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1980 Kawasaki 750 LTD
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I'm at the point where I've got plenty of building experience. Nice thing is that with all the same or very similar bikes I get to know just about every part on them. I'm rebuilding a friends 1980 KZ750 LTD H for some cash. Easy job because I can do it very quickly and efficiently. The KZ engine is a real work horse and fairly simple to work on. Kawasaki makes some **** fine motorcycles/engines IMO. The GPz 750 was one of them.
Have an 82 kz750 ltd.got it all together but carbs. Have all working parts, just need to know how to sync carbs to each other
 

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1983 GPz 750, green
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We should start a new thread regarding carb sync methods. I would describe how I do it to get started when under less than ideal conditions!
 

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I bought that green bike as basically junk and thought I'd turn it into a rat bike for gravel roads. So got some knobby tires for it. Then it looked so good after all my work decided to leave the knobbies on. Runs great and I like the looks. If a person wants to rebuild an old bike look at the costs for things like: tires, brakes, filters, oils/fluids, seals, rubbers, valve job, cables, carb kits, plugs and wires, broken parts, and general clean up. Never mind all the labour and painting and you just spent $2500 or more for a 37 year old bike. Add in a decent paint job and even if you got the bike for $200 no one is willing to pay even $3000 for it and you just spent probably $4000 or more. Realistically for me its a labour of love only, the economics just don't work anymore. Look around and see what kind of bike you can buy for $4000.
I bought that green bike as basically junk and thought I'd turn it into a rat bike for gravel roads. So got some knobby tires for it. Then it looked so good after all my work decided to leave the knobbies on. Runs great and I like the looks. If a person wants to rebuild an old bike look at the costs for things like: tires, brakes, filters, oils/fluids, seals, rubbers, valve job, cables, carb kits, plugs and wires, broken parts, and general clean up. Never mind all the labour and painting and you just spent $2500 or more for a 37 year old bike. Add in a decent paint job and even if you got the bike for $200 no one is willing to pay even $3000 for it and you just spent probably $4000 or more. Realistically for me its a labour of love only, the economics just don't work anymore. Look around and see what kind of bike you can buy for $4000.
Hi Alex, I Agree, we are preserving some history for future generations and not for commercial gain 👍
 

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Hi Alex, I Agree, we are preserving some history for future generations and not for commercial gain 👍
Agreed with you both, if I hadn't spent the money on motorcycles I'd have a very expensive beer gut and my boys would have nothing to remember me by.
 

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Agreed with you both, if I hadn't spent the money on motorcycles I'd have a very expensive beer gut and my boys would have nothing to remember me by.
And I've got the 750 bug too: 750R1, 2 turbos and 3 unitraks (one in bits, another in the slow process of being turned into a Rainey rep and I'm the second owner of a standard '83 A1).
 

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If you can get an aftermarket or new OEM harness for a reasonable sum it is absolutely worth it. Unless you want to spend far too many hours running new wiring and replacing all of the connectors. I rebuilt my harness but only because new ones were not available for my bike.

If you are going to rebuild your harness there is lots of advice I can provide. Lots of lessons were learned the hard way.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
If you can get an aftermarket or new OEM harness for a reasonable sum it is absolutely worth it. Unless you want to spend far too many hours running new wiring and replacing all of the connectors. I rebuilt my harness but only because new ones were not available for my bike.

If you are going to rebuild your harness there is lots of advice I can provide. Lots of lessons were learned the hard way.
There are no new or good cpndition used harnesses available, id be rebuilding this harness, which sucks, or adapting a universal harness
 
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