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Hi all. Recently purchased an 85 ZN1100. Solid bike. Got it for dirt cheap and was running when I bought it. Could tell it has never really had any maintenance done so I've been going through it with a fine tooth comb. Getting close to being road Worthy. Ended up having to scrap the original tank. I was extremely lucky to find another original tank in better condition. Had it lined just for good measure. Upon removing the sending unit and testing, it's bad. My go to OEM parts place said they had another but after I placed the order I received a call saying it was discontinued. Does anyone have an idea of where to find one?? Or even know if there are any other bikes with a similar setup? Willing to go used as long as it works. I've looked everywhere, and have been for a few weeks. Nothing seems to match. Please help!! Ready to ride!!
 

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In the diagrams at Partzilla for the 85 ZN1100-B2, the cross-reference indicates that only the 84-85 ZN1100 models had the same part number for the fuel gauge >> 52005-1066. However, the fuel gauge gasket 11009-1656 was used on a number of models, so you might be able to use the fuel gauge from one of those listed models which include several different Vulcans & some Concours models, among others. In the drawings the Concours fuel gauge for example looks the same, but I have no idea if it will operate your fuel meter the same. The Kawasaki dealer may have supersession info that may indicate if the later meters will swap.


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So I contacted my local dealer this morning. They said that Kawasaki quit producing the part all together. No dealers in there system had any on hand. He also mentioned that the only other sending unit that would be accurate was the 84' ZN1100. I think that the gasket mentioned will fit a lot more models but apparently it's the bend in the rod holding the float thats what really matters. Sits in the tank a certain way to get the most accurate reading. I'm sure I could get a similar one and just mimic the bend to the original one. Not really wanting to Cobb something but I will of I have to. Called a few cycle salvage yards with no luck. I played around with the original some tonight, cleaning it and spraying with some electrical contact cleaner. Was actually able to get a reading from it on the meter. It was not consistent but it's a start. Going to mess around with it some more. Had a strange idea to soak it in some 2-stroke gas for a few days. My thought is that the oil in the fuel may help lube the inside components up some and allow me to better get some of the rust off. We will see...can't hurt anyway
 

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I have the exact same problem. A search on 52005-1066 on this site finds just one hit... this one. I realize that the OP probably no longer visits this forum, but am posting on his thread just to see if anyone else has encountered this problem to see if there are any clever solutions. My bike is a 1984 ZN1100 LTD shaft drive.
 

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Ok, problem solved!!!

It took a bit of testing of the fuel sending unit before I discovered the problem. There was a hidden break in a brass strip that is underneath the rheostat (the rectangular thing with several dozen wraps of fine wire). The brass strip is part of the electrical circuit and without that, the unit is deader than a doornail. In the picture below, the pink coloured pick tool is pointing to the location of the break. Unfortunately the break is in an inaccessible location and it is not really possible to take this unit any further apart in order to gain access for soldering.

So I ran a jumper wire instead. With that done, the fuel gauge came back to life!!! :)(y):cool:

I think this may be a common problem on older bikes like mine. The sharp bend in the brass strip is a stress riser and with the vibration of the motorcycle, they crack and break. The top piece looks fine, until you touch it and notice that it moves. The only thing really holding it in place, is the super skinny coil winding wire. For the Jumper I used 26 gauge solid wire (seen in red on the photos). The solid wire provided quite a bit of rigidity to hold the top broken piece in place, but I plan to strengthen it by adding some epoxy because you sure don't want that nichrome wire to break.
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