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Discussion Starter #1
My 2510 quit while running about 15 MPH. The front plug seemed to be dead, but upon placing a new plug, it was still dead. The rear plug fires. However, it seems to me that it should run on one cylinder. Plugs are both dry.

My question is, why would the failure of the front plug to fire cause the lack of fuel? I have a new coil ordered, but it will take a few days to receive it. Also, I did put two new plugs in, but only the rear fires. Could that lack of a firing coil on the front cylinder cause the fuel pump to fail?

Appreciate any help.
 

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There is a fuel pump circuit control that also handles one of the coils. If that fails it is usually the pulsing coil that has failed and keeps the igniter from triggering the coil.

The 2510 also has a propensity to toss one of the pushrods out of the lifter and stick a valve open or closed if an owner is less than attentive to valve lash adjustment. A valve adjustment and resetting the pushrod in the lifter socket usually solves the problem quickly. A valve stuck open or closed will result in no fuel to that cylinder.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
There is a fuel pump circuit control that also handles one of the coils. If that fails it is usually the pulsing coil that has failed and keeps the igniter from triggering the coil.

The 2510 also has a propensity to toss one of the pushrods out of the lifter and stick a valve open or closed if an owner is less than attentive to valve lash adjustment. A valve adjustment and resetting the pushrod in the lifter socket usually solves the problem quickly. A valve stuck open or closed will result in no fuel to that cylinder.
Thanks much for the advice. I purchased the Mule new and it has about 1000 hours, no valve adjustments yet, Also, as far as putting that new coil in, then you don't think it will start getting fuel?
 

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I recommend picking up a service and repair manual, as I do not think it is a coil unless the coil is dead shorted and pulling the entire circuit to low to trigger the fuel pump. A coil test would tell you in a second. The pulsing coil (ignition sensor) should also be checked. Most dealers will do this for free if you take the parts in to their shop.

I would still check the compression and valves. These tend to work the valves loose when new and will jam one or more open and you then lose that cylinder until it is properly adjusted. 1,000 miles on one of these is a pretty long time if it has not had the valves adjusted from new, especially with the new fuels we have that tend to erode valve seats and faces.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hi,

Yesterday, my neighbor came over to help with the new coil installation. I unscrewed the front spark plug cap, when the neighbor decided we should tool the engine over to check for compression. To my disbelief, the coil (spark plug wire) was sparking like crazy. I had already unscrewed the cap off, so it was just the wire. So I thought we should put the cap back on and attempt to start, which it did, plus ran very well. Also, I did replace the fuel filter before that little test. It was not pugged.

So anyway, the thing runs well. I'm not sure what happened. You have inspired me to adjust the valves, plus I'll start giving it better maintanance. I love that machine and it is the only thing I've ever bought that I've not ever regretted.

Thanks for your help and inspiration.
 

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When you get caught up, pick up a set of Rajah spark plug terminal caps. They are solid brass connectors, and use a means of connecting to the wire that never leaves any doubts about the circuit being good. They are also the most inexpensive fix for loose OEM spark plug connectors that I know of.

I hear you on your Mule. They become indispensable once you have one.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
When you get caught up, pick up a set of Rajah spark plug terminal caps. They are solid brass connectors, and use a means of connecting to the wire that never leaves any doubts about the circuit being good. They are also the most inexpensive fix for loose OEM spark plug connectors that I know of.

I hear you on your Mule. They become indispensable once you have one.
Thanks RCW,

You are a gentlerman. I certainly appreciate your taking the time to help me out. I will pick up a set of those Rajah plugs. Yes, I have been lost without the Mule, since I use it for gathering wood, etc. It is 8 degrees here in Michigan at present.
 
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