Kawasaki Motorcycle Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey so I’m new to having a bike and unfortunately wasn’t super smart about it I forgot to fill my oil and as I was riding the back tire locked then released I thought it was a seized engine but the bike still turns over I put a few Quarts of oil back in the bike but now I’m leaking fuel and I don’t know why I am mostly trying to figure out what kind of damage I did to the bike by running the oil dry I have attached a photo of where the bike is leaking gas
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
309 Posts
Sadly you have likely done some serious damage. It is not unusual for an engine to stick and then turn over. I once had a Kawasaki KZ400 seize the cam, lock the rear wheel and then restart after I had pulled in the clutch and coasted to the side of the road. This was a new machine with less than five miles. The restart got me back to the shop but the damage was done, head and cam ruined. The crank bearings rely on pressurized oil and the resulting oil wedge to prevent metal to metal contact. The piston skirt is another location that needs constant oil. Transmission gears and ball bearings are a bit more tolerant of oil starvation but still need to be inspected. I would not worry too much at this point about the fuel leak as the engine will need a tear down and inspection. One of the dangers here is that even though the engine may run there is likely some transfer of metal on one or more parts. These transfers of metal will cause reduced clearance, localized hot spots and the very real danger of future seizure even though the engine now has oil.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sadly you have likely done some serious damage. It is not unusual for an engine to stick and then turn over. I once had a Kawasaki KZ400 seize the cam, lock the rear wheel and then restart after I had pulled in the clutch and coasted to the side of the road. This was a new machine with less than five miles. The restart got me back to the shop but the damage was done, head and cam ruined. The crank bearings rely on pressurized oil and the resulting oil wedge to prevent metal to metal contact. The piston skirt is another location that needs constant oil. Transmission gears and ball bearings are a bit more tolerant of oil starvation but still need to be inspected. I would not worry too much at this point about the fuel leak as the engine will need a tear down and inspection. One of the dangers here is that even though the engine may run there is likely some transfer of metal on one or more parts. These transfers of metal will cause reduced clearance, localized hot spots and the very real danger of future seizure even though the engine now has oil.
Sadly you have likely done some serious damage. It is not unusual for an engine to stick and then turn over. I once had a Kawasaki KZ400 seize the cam, lock the rear wheel and then restart after I had pulled in the clutch and coasted to the side of the road. This was a new machine with less than five miles. The restart got me back to the shop but the damage was done, head and cam ruined. The crank bearings rely on pressurized oil and the resulting oil wedge to prevent metal to metal contact. The piston skirt is another location that needs constant oil. Transmission gears and ball bearings are a bit more tolerant of oil starvation but still need to be inspected. I would not worry too much at this point about the fuel leak as the engine will need a tear down and inspection. One of the dangers here is that even though the engine may run there is likely some transfer of metal on one or more parts. These transfers of metal will cause reduced clearance, localized hot spots and the very real danger of future seizure even though the engine now has oil.
ok so that kinda sucks but would you have any idea how much that could cost for someone to inspect it
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
10,884 Posts
An engine teardown and inspection cost me more than $2000. And that was 15 yrs ago.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
That hose is the tank vent or the carb float bowl vent.

A salvage yard motor is the best option at this point. iirc, you can use a later 1500 or 1600 FI motor by drilling and tapping one hole in each head for the carb intake. I've heard of people using the slightly more performance Meanstreak motors in the 1500 Classic and Nomad.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top