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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, New to the forum as I just bought a 2005 3010 Trans 4X4 for my Avocado Ranch and have my first question. I think the service manual would answer my question, but it has not arrived yet so thought I would post here. I have noticed a squeak when turning the wheel and last night discovered the rack moves side to side in the 2 clamps that clamp it. The socket head cap screws seem tight and so I am wondering if there is supposed to be something that holds the rack in place (curved spacers between the clamps and rack?) or is the rack allowed to moved? The side to side movement is minimal (~1/16") but I have never seen an application where any movement is normal.
Thanks,
Jay
 

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This is the second time the loose steering rack supports has come up on this forum in about as many weeks. Then I got one of the 3010 Trans diesels in the shop at the farm on Friday with the same problem, so I pulled my two new 4010 Trans diesels fresh out of the crates, in the shop and found the same issue.

Unbelievably poor parts quality is my opinion of the problem. The rubber cushions were way too small on the outside diameter and too large on the inside diameter, even on the two new 4010's. There is no way they can be snugged up on the housing to keep it from moving.

I have seen this happen in really cold weather, where the rubber cushions that encircle the housing get hard then the rack slides and snow lubes the metal to rubber area. I fix that with automotive UTV silicone beads around the housing on the inside and around the outside of the Dampers, let it dry then clamp it all back together.

But, now I am seeing it in Mules that have never been in cold weather, and are new.

The new replacement rubber parts, called Steering Gear Dampers, are also loose. So, it is a manufacturing issue.

How I fixed the problem was to cut two strips of polyurethane a quarter inch thick and a bit wider than the OEM Steering Gear Dampers, and then installed them inside the metal clamps, called Steering Gear Brackets, with tire bead rim lubricant to allow the material to slide entirely over the OEM cushions and tighten the grip the clamps exert on the dampers enough to hold them tightly. If I had not had the urethane I would have used the backing off an old drive belt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
RCW,
Thanks for the response. It sounds to be a prevalent problem, and your idea of cutting some rubber pieces sounds like a good solution. I'll check what I have in the shop and mimic what you have done.

Jay
 

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Dang, just check my posts about it. I was about to do the silicone trick until I saw this. Good thing. I'll try this new trick in the summer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yea, I found your posts after RCW responded to my post. I just hadn't looked far enough. Unlike you, its a balmy 65 here during the day so I will be looking at it this weekend. My service manual showed up today and so now I understand how it goes together. When I have it apart I plan on taking some measurements and then I'll check some other sources to see what might be a good fit. Since most racks on cars are hard mounted, is there any reason this cannot be mounted without the rubber dampners?
Jay
 

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I would stick with the rubber mounting on these. If you ever pull one apart you will see that the lack of beef in that aluminum housing is likely why they use the rubber mounts. I would suspect they crack the housings from vibration if solidly mounted metal to metal.

When I replace them with VW type racks, I solid mount them, but they are many times stronger units and not power steering either!
 
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