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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok i am pretty new to repairing dirtbikes. i had a few questions

I think i am expirencing clutch drag. I can get to neutral and pull the clutch in and when i go to shift to first it dies. I have tried to adjust the perch with no luck.

I have bought a new hinson clutch componnet kit. IE Springs and discs.

I have a manual. and i am a little confused i have two drain plugs. One is Oil Sump and the other is a Transmission Sump. I have read the manual but it doesnt tell me what kind of transmission fluid to put in it or even where. Is there two oils? I have a 85 Weight Transmission oil for wet clutches. Where do i put it in at?

Next i watched a video on how to replace it. when i seen the video they removed the clutch cover and first they pried the pads of the rear brake pedal. Is this neccessary? and if so would i have to open the bleed valve to release the pressure.

Has anyone ever used a hinson clutch? Does it wear well with OEM equpment?

How long should i soak the Discs in Oil. I have heard anywhere from a Hour to overnight.

Anyone with specific knowledge it would be appreciated. I know pretty silly questions. i just want to make sure i am doing everything correct.
 

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Ok i am pretty new to repairing dirtbikes. i had a few questions

I think i am expirencing clutch drag. I can get to neutral and pull the clutch in and when i go to shift to first it dies. I have tried to adjust the perch with no luck.

I have bought a new hinson clutch componnet kit. IE Springs and discs.

I have a manual. and i am a little confused i have two drain plugs. One is Oil Sump and the other is a Transmission Sump. I have read the manual but it doesnt tell me what kind of transmission fluid to put in it or even where. Is there two oils? I have a 85 Weight Transmission oil for wet clutches. Where do i put it in at?

Next i watched a video on how to replace it. when i seen the video they removed the clutch cover and first they pried the pads of the rear brake pedal. Is this neccessary? and if so would i have to open the bleed valve to release the pressure.

Has anyone ever used a hinson clutch? Does it wear well with OEM equpment?

How long should i soak the Discs in Oil. I have heard anywhere from a Hour to overnight.

Anyone with specific knowledge it would be appreciated. I know pretty silly questions. i just want to make sure i am doing everything correct.
You don't need to drain your trans oil. Here's some tips:
1) Lay the bike on it's side rest the handlebar end on your motorcycle stand so the clutch cover is facing up. (when the cover is removed, all the oil lays in the bottom of the crankcase, no spillage)

2) pry apart the rear brake pads (this is so you can push the brake lever all the way down, and zip tye the lever so it's out of the way there to gain clearence to remove the clutch cover. Personally for me, I juts take the lever right off, depends on the exact bike)

3) dissasemble as required.

After you remove all the discs, you might see a badly notched clutch basket. You might be able to file the notches, but this is just a band-aid fix. You really should replace the basket assembly.
 

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The two drain plugs do not make a difference the same oil is used to lubricate the transmission as well as the enging. I started using Maxima synthetic 20/50 when I switched to my Hinson clutch. Im not sure how well the plates match with the stock basket, becasue I went all out with mine and replaced basket, inner/outer hub, pressure plate etc. etc. and found that since the hinson units weigh a little bit more than the stock units it gives the bike more inertia (heavy flywheel feeling) and keeps it from stalling a little more in corners. You shouldn't expect to feel this difference with just replacing the plates and springs. High clutch abuse can notch the basket just as polar bus stated above, which I believe in turn makes your clutch grab on take off and just doesn't pull as hard due to the extensive movement the clutch is aloud. I have seen this more often on 125 two strokes than any since most people are "popping" the clutch more often on the 125s and it has a prone to notch the basket mutch faster than on the four strokes. With the fourstroke mx bikes I have seen more warping than anything and that can cause quick clutch fade and be a consistent nagging issue so your oil choice is key. As far as running a stock engine the manufacturer suggested Kawasaki 20/50 is perfectly fine for your bike and clutch.

When I am switching out my clutch plates the KXF has quite a bit of moving room from the cases to the brake pedal and you can usually move around it without having to adjust the pedal.

basic rule is to soak the plates for 10 - 25 minutes. before installation.

Good Luck I hope this helps you in any way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the help guys. I did as you guys said. when i pulled the clutch apart i found that indeed the basket had excessive wear. So i replaced it. I also noticed the pressure plate had a ton of wear as well. but the inner hub looked good. I replaced both my clutch basket and pressure plate with a hinson baket and plate. Should these wear well with a stock inner hub? (i wish i was rich)and i also replaced the plate kit and springs.

I read somewhere the inner hub allows up to 200%(hinson) more oil to flow through the clutch. Maybe i should replace it if i am gonna use the higher viscosity oil. In your mind is it well worth the 270 bucks or so to replace it?

This is my first bike i have had in well over ten years since i was a kid. I bought it used. I got a super good deal on it and could not pass up on it. YAY me. My fiance got the ring i got the bike.

yeah i dont know how many times as a kid my father had to replace my clutch. He would always tell me dang it. ride with your hand in your pocket!!!

Couple more questions if i may. I was looking at buying a DID CHAIN 520 ERV3 X-RING Chain. Everything i have read about it is positive. Just wondered if either one of you guys had ever used it. Is it worth the money? If not what is your brand of choice?

I plan on doing most of my riding out in the desert moderate climbing all sand. What size sprockets do you recomend? Brand?

I also would really like to put my money back into american products.

ONce again guys i appreciate all your feedback!!

~Hooligan
 

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I believe your hinson units will mesh and wear fine with the stock units, but if you have replaced all of the parts you listed and if you have the funds available I would go ahead and replace your inner hub as well. It would probably be just the same without it, maybe a little more comforbility in your products. But all it takes is a mm here or there off in your clutch to have indirect wear on your plates.

With the X ring chain I have never used the X ring I tend to stick with an O-ring just because most of my riding is track based with not alot of sand. I do tend to replace my chain around every 5 races. (expensive habit). I believe the only real difference is in the chain berrings between the two and the x-ring is to keep more debris out. If you are going to be riding in the desert with alot of sand I would say go for the x-ring for piece of mind, but if your meticulous with cleaning and keep your chain clean and lubed then I would save a few bucks and go with an O-ring.

Sprocket size is all dependent on how you like to run your powerband and if you feel you need the shift in power from one end to another. Deep sand/ hills I would suggest adding two teeth to your sprocket. I run any where from a 50 to a 54 on my 450 depending on the track. I know alot of guys who prefer running a 52 just about anywhere because it makes your 4th and 5th gears decently usuable in hill climbs and trails and such.

Does a 50 or 49 tooth come on the 250f stock? I have some extra 49 and 50 tooth sprockets that will fit your bike if you want or need them.

as far as brand goes. I have used Tag and Renthal and prefer the Renthal sprockets, but Tag is alittle bit cheeper. I just prefer the Renthal due to (in my circumstances) they last a little longer. Renthal also has a twin ring type sprocket that has steel on the outer teeth and aluminum as the base for it. It would probably be a better bet in dustier/ sandier conditions were prolonged life is ideal in parts.

It all ends up boiling down to personal preference so It can be a trail and error process before you find what you prefere especially with sprocket sizing. you can always mess with it a little more by adding or taking a tooth from your countershaft as well.
 
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