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1999 2500 diesel mule starts clicking intermitently when placed in 4wd. Feels like it is skipping a gear and it is a hard clunk. When engaging 4 wd, you can feel a slight vibration in the steering wheel and then the clunking starts. It will go 100 yards before it starts. Happens on soft turf as well as more firm turf so it seems it is in the drivetrain. Any help appreciated.
 

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There are three possible sources of the clicking. The most frequent is the front frictions on the positive traction unit in the front differential. The next most common source is the component of the transmission where the front driveshaft from the transmission leads to the front differential. There is a dog clutch there that will click up a storm if the front tires are a different size than the rears.

The last place where clicking happens is the shift dogs in the transmission itself. That can be shift linkage that needs adjusting or the dogs themselves are knocked round in the transmission from shifting on the fly.
 

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clanking or banging noise when in 4wd.

RCW -
I posted the following and could use some advice on the issue. You sound like you are very knowledgable and could have some ideas.

I have a 2003 Mule 3010 deisel 4wd with 353 hours. When I drive in 4 wd either forward or backward, the front end makes a clunk noise like it is binding up, then releases. I go another hundred yards and it repeats as long as it is in 4wd.
 

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Same issue as the clicking, also see my response to the post about driveline pop from yesterday.

One of the things to check is your tire pressure. You want both front and rear tires to be the same diameter or the damper cam will load up and release to protect the transmission and differential. Some snapping from the damper cam is normal, as the front differential is about 1% faster than the rear differential to keep the machine from overrunning the steering (same as on a four wheel drive pickup).
 
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