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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
alright...got a 3010 Deisel...dont know what year...probably something around 2000 or 2001.

anyways...ran the thing out of fuel yesterday. I've done this is the past, and we've filled it up..pumped and primed the fuel pump, start it up...let it run for awhile...and we'd be good.

Well...today, I put fuel in it...and I can't get it to prime. I'm pumping the pump manually, with the bleed screw out...and getting no fuel.

any ideas what I am doing wrong?

thanks!
 

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sometimes the manual pump lever is in the wrong position to pump, rotate the engine a bit and try again. I don't know if you have this kind. Check for fuel at the pump, put a rag around a air hose at about 10psi measured and pressurize the tank and insure flow to pump, if this is good, time to bleed the injectors. If you have not done this, best left to a shop. Very high pressure with no second chances if it hits your finger. Good luck. Tim
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks for the feedback!

I actually got the thing to run for awhile, but only idle. I could give it some throttle and it just wouldn't do any more. It's done this before...I just had to let it run for about an hour...and it was finally ok.

I still wasn't able to get the thing to bleed though. I can take that bleed screw all the way out and still not getting anything out. I know it's getting fuel...cuz it's running. I'm think maybe that bleed outlet is clogged.

I was messing with it and it died again...it would then start and run for a bit and die. I had to leave...so I didn't get to mess with it much more. I"ll have to try again next time I am there. I was thinking I would make sure the bleed outlet wasn't clogged.
 

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You are going about it differently than I would. The bleed screw is only good for getting air out of the lines and filter leading to the injection pump, but will not remove air from the injection lines and delivery valve.

My recommendation is to wear good eye protection, then crack each injection line open at the injector end, one at a time while it is idling. By cracking open, that is exactly all that is done. Just barely loosen one at a time and allow the trapped air to push out, then you will see pressuized fuel begin to pulse and it is time to snug the line back up. Move to the next, and so on. Usually they will smooth out and start running on all three once one or two are bleed.

Caution: Be real careful not to inject pressurized diesel through your skin, it will kill you! So, just barely loosen those injector end fittings one at a time, and no more!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You are going about it differently than I would. The bleed screw is only good for getting air out of the lines and filter leading to the injection pump, but will not remove air from the injection lines and delivery valve.

My recommendation is to wear good eye protection, then crack each injection line open at the injector end, one at a time while it is idling. By cracking open, that is exactly all that is done. Just barely loosen one at a time and allow the trapped air to push out, then you will see pressuized fuel begin to pulse and it is time to snug the line back up. Move to the next, and so on. Usually they will smooth out and start running on all three once one or two are bleed.

Caution: Be real careful not to inject pressurized diesel through your skin, it will kill you! So, just barely loosen those injector end fittings one at a time, and no more!
OK, thanks. I'll try this next time I am up there. Usually...I can just get the air out at the pump...and I'm good. Seems weird to me...that this time I can't get it to bleed there.
 

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If you attempt to start after changing the filter, and do not prime until all air is out of the lines the injection pump will air lock either itself or one or more injector pop off valves.

Always bleed all air out that you can, and so the fuel is clear without bubbles, then tighten the bleeder and attempt to start. If it does not start and run smoothly, then it is necessary to bleed the deliver valve and injection lines as I described above.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If you attempt to start after changing the filter, and do not prime until all air is out of the lines the injection pump will air lock either itself or one or more injector pop off valves.

Always bleed all air out that you can, and so the fuel is clear without bubbles, then tighten the bleeder and attempt to start. If it does not start and run smoothly, then it is necessary to bleed the deliver valve and injection lines as I described above.
Keep in mind...my problem is I can not get the pump to bleed. I can get the thing to run...but when I try and bleed the lines I get nothing out of the bleed screw. I've done this several times and I've always been able to bleed the lines. This is new.

No filter was changed. Root cause is it ran out of fuel.

Thanks.
 

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Follow the same drill as if you changed the filter to get the air out of the feed lines and filter. Once you have clear fuel at the pump bleeder you will close it and move to the shortest injection line and crack it at the injector.

You can also use compressed air on the tank, not more than 3 psi, to force the fuel up through the system to the injection pump to get fuel flowing again. This is a bit tricky, as you will need to pinch the rubber fuel return line to the tank closed, remove the fuel cap and come up with a means to just slightly pressurize the tank. Usually a rag wrapped around an air nozzle works just great - but keep the pressure low, you do not want to blow the tank.

Then open the air screw on top of the filter and let the fuel flow there first. Once you have no more air in the fuel, close it and open the bleeder on the injection pump and allow it to clear all the air.

Then bleed the injector lines, shortest one first by cranking the engine over while the injection line nut at the injector is just cracked enough to allow the air and some fuel to spit. When the air quits spitting, tighten that nut and move to the next shortest line.

It will usually start after the first line clears, then run really rough. It may be necessary to crack the other lines one at a time to get it to clear if it is really air bound.

Check your filter before you start this process. If the filter is plugged from pulling dirt and water out of the tank as it was running dry, it will need to be changed before it will flow fuel.
 
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