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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a '77 KZ1000 with 83,000 miles. I need to replace gears on the input or output shaft. Can someone give me some tips on how to get started?

I am sure it's a problem with one of the shafts. When I pulled the oil pan recently, there were pieces of a spline washer in the pan. I ran it for another 3,000 miles, and it just locked up this week.

Please help!
 

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itching to ride
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Congratulations on the 30 years. You are going to have to split the cases. Most of the details should be in your service manual. Also take pictures as you go. I find it is a good way of keeping track of what goes where even when you have a manual.
 

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I don't scrape gaskets any more either. Every since I found out that Dremel makes attachments similar to the ones for a die grinder. It's not as heavy duty/long lasting as the ones for a die grinder but if you already own a moto tool then there is not much expense to doing it this way.
 

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You know what happens when you use the Scotchbrite scrubby pads and a die grinder to remove gaskets from aluminum? You no longer have a flat mating surface.

I use a die grinder and scrubby pads on steel/iron, but never again on aluminum.
 

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AZ's Official Mechanic
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You know what happens when you use the Scotchbrite scrubby pads and a die grinder to remove gaskets from aluminum? You no longer have a flat mating surface.

I use a die grinder and scrubby pads on steel/iron, but never again on aluminum.
only if your a moron and hold it there for 5 mins in the same spot and push like godzilla...have used them on everything from clutch covers to case halves.... have NEVER had a leak on customers bikes or my own for that matter.. they make 3 different kind,,fine,med,rough..... i use the fine/med 99% of the time... :mrgreen:
 

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You know what happens to that flat aluminum surface when you hold a sharp scraper at the wrong angle, it causes a gouge. Most methods of gasket removal have the potential to damage aluminum surfaces if used incorrectly.
 

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5 minutes and push like Godzilla on a air die grinder with a maroon scotchbrite pad?

It's really not nice to call someone you don't even know a moron, especially someone that started turning wrenches in 1961 :D
 

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It's all in the attitude for gasket scrapping. I enjoy the diligence and exercise and the rewarding result of a good gasket scrape, like creating a fine musical piece with your favorite horn.

But, on topic, splitting the cases is a lot of work, and high focus on dis- and re-assembly procedures. So meditate for a day or two, then jump into the hard work. Brave man to ride with known spline damage. Quick de-clutching might not release the lock up in a high speed sweeper.
 

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You know what happens when you use the Scotchbrite scrubby pads and a die grinder to remove gaskets from aluminum? You no longer have a flat mating surface.

I use a die grinder and scrubby pads on steel/iron, but never again on aluminum.
Hard to believe we actually agree once in a great while :D
I will never use those scotchbrite wheels on a mating surface . Let me be clear , NEVER.
I use a chisel tip exacto blade in an all aluminum handle for most small work , a KD tools scraper for medium work and an actual chisel for extreme cases . Once the bulk of the gasket is removed I apply various sizes of sharpening stone to the remainder using a bit of oil to help dissolve what is left and keep the parting surface as flat as possible . Repeated use of the scotchbrite wheels destroys the parting line , rounds off the edges , and creates possible leaks no mater how careful you are .

I've had to make do the best I could when confronted by an owner or previous mechanic that has destroyed a parting line this way including complete disassembly and surface milling in the worst case .

I've fired three otherwise good mechanics that refused to heed this . One is here on this forum and has seen the error of his ways in later years as his previous work comes back to haunt him . He may or may not answer up .(feel free to tell them what kind of bastich I am to work for :D) Steell and myself @ 30+ years each and another @ 15+ years of experience that can tell you this isn't a good idea .

Far from being yet another oil, tire pressure , car tire , loud pipe , Wilma or Betty , Ginger or Maryanne topic the use of powered abrasives for gasket removal is just wrong .

For the youngsters and know it alls out there that want to take a shot go right ahead . I've shared my experience and I'm done with ya. If you want to take exception with my experience go right ahead but don't expect a war of words . I have far to thick a skin to be sucked into that bs .

~kop
 

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Eddie Lawson is God!
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Hard to believe we actually agree once in a great while :D
I will never use those scotchbrite wheels on a mating surface . Let me be clear , NEVER.
I use a chisel tip exacto blade in an all aluminum handle for most small work , a KD tools scraper for medium work and an actual chisel for extreme cases . Once the bulk of the gasket is removed I apply various sizes of sharpening stone to the remainder using a bit of oil to help dissolve what is left and keep the parting surface as flat as possible . Repeated use of the scotchbrite wheels destroys the parting line , rounds off the edges , and creates possible leaks no mater how careful you are .

I've had to make do the best I could when confronted by an owner or previous mechanic that has destroyed a parting line this way including complete disassembly and surface milling in the worst case .

I've fired three otherwise good mechanics that refused to heed this . One is here on this forum and has seen the error of his ways in later years as his previous work comes back to haunt him . He may or may not answer up .(feel free to tell them what kind of bastich I am to work for :D) Steell and myself @ 30+ years each and another @ 15+ years of experience that can tell you this isn't a good idea .

Far from being yet another oil, tire pressure , car tire , loud pipe , Wilma or Betty , Ginger or Maryanne topic the use of powered abrasives for gasket removal is just wrong .

For the youngsters and know it alls out there that want to take a shot go right ahead . I've shared my experience and I'm done with ya. If you want to take exception with my experience go right ahead but don't expect a war of words . I have far to thick a skin to be sucked into that bs .

~kop
Dennis likes to use oil to soften a gasket, while I like to use DOT3 brake fluid. Either works well, gasket's LOTS easier to scrape when soft. Now, when I scraped HUNDREDS of Mitsubishi 4G63 head gaskets after a timing belt break. I used a whizz wheel on the iron BLOCK and soaked the head gasket surface in brake fluid and scraped with a proper gasket scraper. Now, I use an MLS gasket. Isn't technology good?

For the record, it's Rotella, recommended, BT45, 4:1, Betty, Marianne, and NEVER on Aluminum.

I HAVE put a motor together in the pits with a Snap-On impact gun. It only needed to last about ten seconds.
 
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