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Discussion Starter #1
I was out riding one day and i started losing power. Stopped to check it out and i noticed the wires were melted. So i started heading for home and made it about 10 miles when the battery finally died on me, and towed it home...
So obviously i need a new rectifier, but i don't know if the rectifier was the only problem. Ive been reading a bit about it and it sounds like the regulator or even the stator may have sparked the problem???

I've also had a charging problem with the bike ever since i bought it, battery needs to be charged after about a week of riding...

Any ideas?
 

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If the rectifier has gone out, it might have taken out the stator for the alternator. Do you have a shop manual? It will have wiring diagrams and troubleshooting steps to determine what will need replacing.

ElectroSport Industries - Motorcycle, Dirt Bike and ATV Aftermarket Electrical Parts has a troubleshooting page for your problem.
Some 650's had a single phase alternator and others had a three phase system. To determine what you've got, see if any YELLOW wires come from the alternator stator, If you see 3 YELLOW wires, you've got a newer stator with the standard 3 phase system.
 

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In my experiences, many times fried wires stems from bad negitive ground(s), and corrossion within positive male female connectors.

I live by di-electric silicone grease !
 

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I live by di-electric silicone grease !
When I reassembled my bike after having the frame powder coated, I reworked the wiring harness. I lightly sanded all male and female connectors then packed the female end with di-electric grease before plugging the male end in. Once it was connected, I wiped off all the excess that was forced out.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
well, i do not have a shop manual for it, but i do have a wiring diagram...

I just don't have any money to waist right now. I don't want to replace my rectifier and have it fry out again, cuz my regulator is bad or something like that.

So if anybody thinks i can just replace my rectifier, slap some di-electric grease on it and ride away, then ill do that.

Otherwise i've read that i can use the 78 and newer regulator/rectifier and generator system. Where the regulator and rectifier are one piece, but then i have to buy the generator/stator setup too.

I don't know what to do, and riding season is just around the corner...
 

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GHOSTRIDER
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well, i do not have a shop manual for it, but i do have a wiring diagram...

I just don't have any money to waist right now. I don't want to replace my rectifier and have it fry out again, cuz my regulator is bad or something like that.

So if anybody thinks i can just replace my rectifier, slap some di-electric grease on it and ride away, then ill do that.

Otherwise i've read that i can use the 78 and newer regulator/rectifier and generator system. Where the regulator and rectifier are one piece, but then i have to buy the generator/stator setup too.

I don't know what to do, and riding season is just around the corner...
No,I dont think thats whats being said. I would do this,you say have a wiring diagram for your bike,does it show an isolated rectifier as opposed to the regulator/rectifier you showed on the pic?Does your wiring diagram jive with whats on your bike now,wire colors and components?To own one of these bikes you need a few inexpensive and very necessary tools begining with a service manual $30,automotive multimeter $30,metric feeler gauge that has at least a .040mm blade in it $10,and a compression tester,$30. Your going to need to preform a few electrcal tests to determine exactly whats wrong with your electricl system. The first test is making sure the previous owner(s) havent rigged some non OEM components or upgrades that have faulted the system. We're here to help, but you have at least get that multimeter and study that diagram so we help :wink:
 

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Zoro, that's not an integrated reg/rec in his pic, that's just the rectifier.

#4 is a rectifier, #32 is an integrated reg/rec.

 

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GHOSTRIDER
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Good looking out there steell,my mistake:redface:Thats good for the OP, I was afraid he had a modified electrical system. Once he gets a multitester somebody with a 650 manual can walk him through the tests. He indicated charging problems so I suspect more than just a rectifier going south on him.It still unadvisable to plug in a new rectifier without checking the whole system first.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The wiring diagram i have is for my exact bike, the picture i posted is just a rectifier, regulator is separate.
The bike's wiring harness has been viciously attacked by its previous owner, blinkers are gone and starter is there but the wires are hacked off from the starter all the way up to the bars, found fuses buried upon wires and electric tape...
Ive gone through it somewhat with the wiring diagram and cleaned things up a bit, and everything seems to be where it should be (what is left of it).
Ive got a multimeter, feeler gauge, and a compression tester, but i guess ill need to order a manual...
 

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GHOSTRIDER
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Yeah you need a manual, meanwhile start watching ebay for the rectifier and with the help of a member with your bike you can start testing the alternator output.Charge the battery and see if it holds a charge,you must have a good battery to conduct the testing,a full 12 volts is needed and you may as well use a hydrometer to make sure each cell is good. Always use distilled water to refill the cells. Varify a good battery and we'll go from there :wink: Wow, a 64 Bonnie! I just noticed that Cool!
 

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Your motorcycle appears to have a field regulated charging system with a solid state rectifier and mechanical regulator. Now, "usually" when the problem that you have shown ( black rectifier) occurs, that is the only problem, but sometimes it may take out the main alternator windings. What I would do:
1. Remove the yoke assembly (main windings), test them for shorts to ground and each other, and check to see if the windings wire coating has turned black from overheating. If everything seems ok,
2. Obtain a replacement rectifier and install.
3. Check charging system voltages for correct readings. If they are not, we can take a closer look at the regulator, or elsewhere. (possible short???)

The regulator usually does not contribute to a failure such as this unless the field regulator point set is welded shut causing the alternator to go into full field which may cause the rectifier to overheat and short out. This condition is rare, indeed.

Post back.
 

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I also have a Kz650B1
luckily i had not ran the bike like this:

So I bought this from Z1, It replaces the recitifier and regulator as one unit i should say:

Here is the instructions it came with:

I had to drill some holes next the old regulator mount and i just mounted my new gizmo there.
Hope this helps,

Just bee sure to follow the wires that might have been cooked, replace and recheck!
I just wanted to avoid a used recitifier so I figured i'd get new of both Regulator/Recitifier......One more thing! You wont need to convert a stator or rotor generator doo-hee-kee, just some rewiring, make sure what ever wire connection is permanent to use connecters with heat shrink, works well for me

---Eric
 

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Discussion Starter #18
well, i pulled out the stator assembly, the yolk looks to be ok... Does anyone know how to test it?
View attachment 33846

accept the connector on the wire coming off the coil is black...
View attachment 33847

View attachment 33848
what do you guys think about that?


Oh, and i checked out the regulator, and the points look good
 

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Problem is, the best way to check it is while it's installed :)

Right now you can measure the resistance (less than 3 ohm is probably ok) and do a visual check. When you get it running there are other tests, but I'd have to dig up my manual to get the specs.
 
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