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There's no real "setting" for the idle screws, you have a starting point, and get the bike to smooth out, and then you're there. The idle circuit contributes to the total fuel used by the motorcycles. It can be a real P.I.T.A. to adjust. I would have a set of carb vacuum gauges to watch the sync, and to see what's doing what. Nice looking bike. I always though with lower bars, maybe even flat bars with risers, they would look really slick. If you ever get rear ended, that back rest will be a real horror. You could get a much loower pad for the passenger, that wouldn't drag the both of you down the road with the car. I was working at a Kawasaki dealership in 1983, and we always adised people to get the lower back rest possible. IMHO :)
 

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Those idle screw plug screws were a government requirement. We had a bag of the at the shop, to put back in after popping them out. A spark plug reading at idle after runing will tell you if the bike is rich or lean. The reason I say use sync gauges is in the event that there is an rpm change, it's easier tosee than hear. I usually lean the bike, the go back a half or quarter turn back to rich to make the bike right. 1 and 1/4 turn is a good starting point. K and G made a back rest that came up to the small of your back. I usually mounted a tank bag on the rack. I made my own back pad for my passenger, it's only 6" inches tall. Your bike sounds like your hitting a lean spot. The bikes made in those years were very cold blooded. You could raise the needles on the CV Carbs one notch. The little enrichment will give you much needed fuel. I had to do that for my GS750ES '83, and it has no flat spots at all. I believe at 1500 your off the idle circuit. I try raising the needles one notch (if the carb needles allow for that) and see what happens. It sounds from what your writing a lean condition exist, raising the needle will give you more fuel and probably take care of the rough spot, that or fatten the idle screws all the same amount of turns, or partial turns. . IMHO. :)
 

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That bike is too old to be fuel injected. They are probably CV carbs. If you let the bike idle till it's nice and hot, then take out a spark plug, the color of the plug will tell you if it is too rich or too lean. It should be a tannish color, but very light tan. It shouldn't be dark at all, that would indicate rich, or oil coming from somewhere. ;)

Organ Purple Mouth Green Organism
 

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Wow, that bike was really ahead of it's time. I remember them being finished off so well. I learn something new every day! That's why a manual, or checking out for yourself is best. Thanks!

What does the D.F.I. do? My 1973 Mercedes 450SL fuel injection shortens or lengthens the length of the injector spray, it is port injected. It does nothing else. It even has a dial with a clicker built in so you can "lean" or "enrich" the intake by lengthening the spray duration. The controller for these cars is located in the upper passenger foot well, if I remember correctly, counterclockwise shortens the length of the spray. It uses 4 points in the distributor to send the signal the the control box. It's mounted to the side of the distributor with two bolts. ;)
 

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That is so weird. Partzilla shows the 1982 KZ1000 and 1100 to have carbs.

Found some interesting info in an older thread.

Kind of surprised the heck out of me too. ;)
 
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