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My will to absorb information constantly has me thinking up numerous questions so instead of making tons of threads I'll just toss a few of them in here and hopefully I can get some answered. Keep in mind that I have looked up most of these but have found no concrete answers, so I think real human opinions are the next best thing.

1. 2009 Ninja 250r, use it to commute 40 miles round trip to my campus daily, 25% 55-65 mph highway roads and the rest is 35-45 stop and go through traffic. Looking for a recommendation on a good set of tires with tire life the top priority. Not a super aggressive/fast rider but when I get bored in my spare time I like to go ride randomly on windy backroads so grip would prolly come second.

2. I think I've settled on a Camelbak Urban Assault backpack and I've found nothing stating that its waterproof besides the laptop pouch; tips on waterproofing backpacks?

3. Tips on washing the bike? So far the idea has been hand wash and hand dry. Any favorite products out there for things such as the exhaust/fairings/windshields/helmet face shields?

4. And finally I think...a rear stand, recommendations here? And can I do maintenance on the back of the bike with a rear stand(changing tires/chains/etc) or do I need something else?

So yeah, this should do for now heh. If anyone is bored and filled with vast knowledge feel free to give me some pointers, any help is appreciated and thanks in advance.

EDIT: Oh wow how'd I forget this...looking for mods that improve fuel economy as well.
 

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1. No clue, sorry.

2. Uh, ditto.

3. Plexus for cleaning plastics. Meguiars ScratchX for fine swirls in plastics.

4. See #1 above.
 

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2. waterprofing

besides mentioning to use google for a search

there are a few good product out that can be applied. I personally have used just melted Suet which is just beef fat, but I am a butcher & all my work boots are waterprofed with suet, it keeps water from weeping in along the strings. but be warned in summer suet can get rancid..... but I wash down the meat dept 3 or 4 days a week, & I keep feet dry.

as for waterprofing bags........ no matter how hard you try water can get in. your best option is to use plastic bags & pack every thing inside bag or backpack in 1 or 2 bags. that normally works really well, other than the inconvience of having to specially pack & unpack every item.


Later,
Randy
 

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My will to absorb information constantly has me thinking up numerous questions so instead of making tons of threads I'll just toss a few of them in here and hopefully I can get some answered. Keep in mind that I have looked up most of these but have found no concrete answers, so I think real human opinions are the next best thing.

1. 2009 Ninja 250r, use it to commute 40 miles round trip to my campus daily, 25% 55-65 mph highway roads and the rest is 35-45 stop and go through traffic. Looking for a recommendation on a good set of tires with tire life the top priority. Not a super aggressive/fast rider but when I get bored in my spare time I like to go ride randomly on windy backroads so grip would prolly come second.
Any sport touring tire will give you as much grip as you can use on your bike and have better life than a true sport tire. Not familiar with the sizes you need for the Ninja 250 but look for:

Continental Road Attack
Dunlop Roadsmart
Pirelli Angel ST
Metzler Roadtec Z6
Michelin Pilot Road 2

2. I think I've settled on a Camelbak Urban Assault backpack and I've found nothing stating that its waterproof besides the laptop pouch; tips on waterproofing backpacks?
You can try using a waterproofing treatment like Nikwax or even just use something like ScotchGuard. If the bag doesn't have a "waterproof" layer then the above treatments will only work in a light rain/mist etc. Does the bag have a rain cover available? Have you considered a tank bag that has straps to be used as a backpack when off the bike? Most tank bags come with a rain cover.

3. Tips on washing the bike? So far the idea has been hand wash and hand dry. Any favorite products out there for things such as the exhaust/fairings/windshields/helmet face shields?
Best is a garden hose to wash loose dirt off, then a bucket and rags with your favorite car wash soap, Turtle Wax, Meguiers etc. I use a shop towel/rag soaked in WD40 to clean the wheels, swingarm etc. especially the rear to get the chain lube fling off. Just don't spray directly onto wheels as you may get it on the tires or brake discs. Don't forget to lube your chain after a wash, best to do it right after the ride mentioned below when the chain is warm.

Follow up with a quick ride to blow water out of crevices and exhaust and then towel/shammy dry. Helmet and face shield just a damp cloth, followed by a clean lint free cloth to polish the faceshield and keep it streak free. I also like to use Pledge on the visor, it works very well in the rain to help water bead off and keep the visor clean, or as mentioned Plexus does the same for a few $$$ more. Pledge is also great on your windshield. I also just use Pledge for a quick clean if the bike is just dusty, spray the tank, fairings, windshield, let it sit for a minute or two to soften bugs, then polish. Be careful when you're spraying Pledge, just like WD40 keep it away from tires and brake discs, but also watch your foot pegs, I've found them slippery after spraying the bike for a quick wipe/wash simply because some of the sprayed Pledge settled onto the pegs and made them very slippery, so much so that now I just throw a shop rag/towel over the pegs before I spray it.

4. And finally I think...a rear stand, recommendations here? And can I do maintenance on the back of the bike with a rear stand(changing tires/chains/etc) or do I need something else?
Any paddock stand/rear stand will make chain maintenance, tire changes etc. a lot easier, well worth the investment.

So yeah, this should do for now heh. If anyone is bored and filled with vast knowledge feel free to give me some pointers, any help is appreciated and thanks in advance.

EDIT: Oh wow how'd I forget this...looking for mods that improve fuel economy as well.
Best mod to improve fuel economy is your right wrist. Use it gradually and be super smooth and you'll get great mileage, twist it hard to the stop every time and you'll be stopping more often for gas. Personally I ride for fun so I could care less what mileage I get. You're already riding one of the most fuel efficient bikes on the market, ride it and enjoy it. :)
 

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For the best fuel economy try doing these steps:

1.Keep the drive chain properly tensioned and lubed.

2.Inflate the tires to the rated max(it will make for a firmer ride but the rolling resistance will be lowered).

3.Keep the air and fuel filters clean.

4.Depending on where you live, the thinner oil weights(10W and 15W) will give better milage than say, 20W does.

5.Properly gapped and correct heat range sparkplugs will help too.
 

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I'm your Huckleberry
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I can personally vouch for the Michelin Pilot Road 2's bross mentioned...I have 9000 miles on the ones mounted to my ZX-14...they've still got quite a bit of life left. On top of that, I felt they were far better in the twisties than the stock Bridgestones (BT-014?) that lasted 2000 miles. I've had another set waiting to go on for a couple months now...these just won't wear out!
 

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ZMICK1300
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Try baby wipes for your helmet and visor. or if you have lots of time on your hands moisten a piece of kitchen towel and leave it spread over the visor for an hour or so. That will soften the bugs and make cleaning helmet and visor a lot easier and it won't get scratched!
 

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Slow Guy on a Fast Bike
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We both have Continental Road Attacks on our bikes, and the perform very well, and seem to have a long lifespan. Don't know if they are available for your application, but it's worth checking.

Honda Polish and Plexus. these are the two mandatory cleaners in our garage. The Plexus cleans pretty much anything, including windshields and faceshields, (and eyeglasses actually). And I use the honda Polish as a quick spray on "polish" on the bikes after a cleaning. It helps to keep dirt and grime from sticking, and gives a nice quick shiny finish.
I usually wahs the bikes very quickly....I'd rather be riding than cleaning any day of the week. A quick light spray with the hose, followed by a quick (yes, quick again) clean with a soapy microfibre cloth. Another rinse.....maybe a some Honda Polish, and that's it for me.
 

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Insect Impact Analyst
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Tires: Pirelli Sport Demons are the favorites of a lot of 250 owners. They offer the smaller size tires for the smaller bikes. I have a set on my 250 and they handle really well. It's my first set though, so I haven't had a chance to wear them out yet.

As for fuel economy, aside from being easy on your wrist, you can also looking at changing your gear ratios slightly. A lot of people get a slightly smaller rear sprocket and a larger front sprocket. Not sure what the ratios are on the 2008 and later, but the earlier models, people would move up to a 15 tooth from a 14 on the front, and bump down from a 45 to a 42 on the rear. This will cause your engine to run slightly slower at any given speed, but will have a slight decrease on power. If you are riding at highway speeds most often, it might be a decent investment as this is when you tend to wrap out the motor the most. Just remember, the higher the engine RPMs, the more gas you are going to use. (remember this rule when shifting, too, as you can shave a bit off by shifting at slightly lower RPMs, provided you don't need the extra power).
 

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Bridgestone B-21's. I had them on my old 650R and got over 10,000 miles out of them (stay on top of the tire inflation, as somebody suggested earlier). As for washing it, just regular dish soap and water. Don't waste your money on all of that other stuff. Just my opinion. Pitbull stands are the best and definately worth the extra money.
 

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I'm really happy with Bridgerock BattleAx tires.
Gas mileage tips are the same for anything, avoid jack rabbit starts and stops, don't wring it out. Basically, take all the fun out of it. Keep up on maintenance, especially keeping the carbs clean.
You really want to bump your mileage, learn to ride in the draft on the highway. You can feel when you're in it and when you're not. Only problem is staying there. At high speeds, the draft behind a semi is pretty long, but it's still not that long. At lower speeds, it's not long enough.
 
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