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Discussion Starter #1
I'm nowhere near ready for a ride like that...but it's a goal. (Gotta love Wild Hogs...funny movie!).

My concern on a ride that long is the physical toll that it takes..which makes you tired and leads to accidents. The other issue is mechanical. I'd hate to be in the middle of nowhere and be stuck.

thoughts?
 

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Novice Tank Roller
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modern motorcycles are really good mechanically, so the risk of break-down is minimized. Most carry some type of towing insurance, and I believe if you join AMA, it's part of the membership package. That'd give you relief from that.

As for physical, it really depends on the mileage each day that you'd intend to do, and also how tight your scheduled is so that you could take a day off if you didn't feel like riding.

I do 4-day riding trips regularly during the course of the year. Most don't end up with that many miles because we ride back-roads and curves. My 4 day trips usually range from 1000 to 1200 miles. The type of bike you are riding is important too. The more comfort the better when rolling up high mileage.

Give us a little idea of the type of trip you'd want to do and input will be more specific to what you'll experience.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hey NCDave...I'm actually in Matthews, NC...not too far from you.

I'm working my way up to longer rides...just started riding again a few weeks ago. I'm on a 2006, 1500 Classic fully dressed...so it's about as comfortable as it can get ;). I'd like to do a ride from NC to the Keys or Miami...and would love to try NC to the Pacific coast one day.

thks
Mike
 

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Novice Tank Roller
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Charlotte to Daytona is an easy enough ride for one day. It'd be another day to the Keys. I've given thought to doing a week ride. that way I'd have 3 days down there. More than enough, I'd think.

I was never real big on the 1500 on the highway for long periods of time. My connie made the trip much better. Comfort on the 1500 was never a problem for me though.

Do a weekend trip to OBX. That'd give you a fair idea of riding all day long.
 

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Slow Guy on a Fast Bike
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My wife and I take a two week road trip each year.......and the single most important thing we have learned is to take it easy. We have found that rushing along to make miles does nothing but deprive you of the down time you are looking for.

Take your time, stop and smell the roses, it will make your trip so much more worthwile than speeding along trying to get to that next destination 800 miles away by nightfall.

We usually don't travel more than 300 to 400 miles in a day, and many days we travel far less than that. IMO, it's about the journey, not the destination.
 

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Warning V2k Onboard
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I rode from LA to NY and back way back in the late 80s on a Yamaha XV1000 Midnight special.
I took 3 months to do it but travelled through nearly every state.
I went north from LA and across the top, popped into Canada for a couple of days, eventually getting to NY. Then went southern route from there with a few trips into Mexico, back to LA.
I'm thumbing this out on my phone so my details are sketchy, but when I'm at a computer with a map I can give a much better Idea of where I went.
The main thing for me was that time wasn't an issue and I had enough money to get by.
I basically picked a direction every day and just went that way until I wanted to stop.
Some days were Ironbutt others were a trip to the corner shop.
If I didn't want to ride I would stay.
Met many fantastic people and had offers of help, accomodation and just plain interest and enthusiasm everywhere I went
One of the best experiences of my life.
 

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I'm riding for 6 days but 2 is not all riding from fl to Tenn... in 2 weeks I figure we will have close to 2000 miles all said and done
 

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I rode from LA to NY and back way back in the late 80s on a Yamaha XV1000 Midnight special.
I took 3 months to do it but travelled through nearly every state.
I went north from LA and across the top, popped into Canada for a couple of days, eventually getting to NY. Then went southern route from there with a few trips into Mexico, back to LA.
I'm thumbing this out on my phone so my details are sketchy, but when I'm at a computer with a map I can give a much better Idea of where I went.
The main thing for me was that time wasn't an issue and I had enough money to get by.
I basically picked a direction every day and just went that way until I wanted to stop.
Some days were Ironbutt others were a trip to the corner shop.
If I didn't want to ride I would stay.
Met many fantastic people and had offers of help, accomodation and just plain interest and enthusiasm everywhere I went
One of the best experiences of my life.
that sounded lioke funn
 

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I rode from LA to NY and back way back in the late 80s on a Yamaha XV1000 Midnight special.
I took 3 months to do it but travelled through nearly every state.
I went north from LA and across the top, popped into Canada for a couple of days, eventually getting to NY. Then went southern route from there with a few trips into Mexico, back to LA.
I'm thumbing this out on my phone so my details are sketchy, but when I'm at a computer with a map I can give a much better Idea of where I went.
The main thing for me was that time wasn't an issue and I had enough money to get by.
I basically picked a direction every day and just went that way until I wanted to stop.
Some days were Ironbutt others were a trip to the corner shop.
If I didn't want to ride I would stay.
Met many fantastic people and had offers of help, accomodation and just plain interest and enthusiasm everywhere I went
One of the best experiences of my life.
Man, that sounds like the ultimate trip! What a hoot...3 months of point-n-go, I could get into that! How many miles? :cool:
 

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Warning V2k Onboard
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Man, that sounds like the ultimate trip! What a hoot...3 months of point-n-go, I could get into that! How many miles? :cool:
Yep, Point-N-Go was what it was all about.
As to the number of miles, lets just say more than a few.

I just googled a rough map of my general direction.
Google seems to be limited on the number of points you can drag the route to.
I wandered randomly in every direction from this main route, just taking my time and seeing anything and everything of interest.
Many times my decision on which way to go next was made by someone I met in a bar, offers to come and stay or "You must go and see this" comments.

I'd do it all again in a heartbeat.

 

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humble pie consumer
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In 2004 I rode to NY from CA, down to Florida and then back to CA on a '97 1500 classic. The only issue was a broken speedometer cable that was fixed under warranty in OK city.

Last year I rode to red lodge from Bakersfield and then on to Wisconsin, back through Colorado and AZ on a ‘06 FXDBI, no issue just great riding.

I’ve taken long trips on an xs650 Yamaha, 750 Night Hawk and even a 450 Honda. The point being; it is fun, safe and something that gets in your blood and you will always remember it.
 

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TV Guru
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The biggest issues I can think of when doing such a long ride are:

- Tires: unless you have a brand new set or your bike is really good on tires, you may be stopping for a set during the trip if you're going on a large loop.
- Chain: If your bike has a chain, you're gonna need to clean and lube it during the trip, especially if it rains or you end up in sandy or dusty environments.
- Oil: Be prepared to do an oil change sometime during the round trip. Check the level each day, especially in harsh climates.
- Rain and cold: dress in layers and carry good rain gear. Wet and cold is 5 times worse while rolling down the road. Double up socks and get a good set of glove liners even if you have cold weather gloves. Carry an extra trash bag or two as a backup if something goes wrong with the rain suit. Also, pack EVERYTHING in plastic since saddlebags and trunks seldom keep all the wet stuff out. Make sure those boots will keep the wet out. WET = COLD.
- Tire pressure: keep an eye on it. Running all day in the Southwest heat, then letting things sit overnight in the desert cold is a sure way to screw with your tire pressure.
- No bungies: Seriously. Use proper straps and tie downs to hold your gear on the bike. A failed bungie cord can take you down when it or the gear it was holding goes into a wheel. No loose items, either. Pack items in bags that can be properly attached to the bike. Avoid anything that flaps in the breeze.
- Watch your gas. In some areas, gas stations can be 100 miles apart. Stop frequently. If a sign says "last gas for 75 miles", they mean it - top off the tank.
- GPS: a great friend, but GPS can also stand for "Gets Potentially Stupid". Bad GPS data can put you into a bad spot, so it's no substitute for proper planning. The GPS may say you can get there from here, but it won't tell you the road is paved with kitty litter or requires fording the river. Carry a basic US road atlas with major route listings as a backup. A basic boy scout compass will help when all the signs disappear.
- Keep hydrated: Heat stroke is potentially more dangerous than frostbite. Heat stroke can damge your brain and vital organs. If you suddenly realize you've stopped sweating or haven't had to pee in over 2 hours, you aren't drinking enough fluids. Plan on stopping every 150 to 200 miles to take a five minute break. This will let you take a drink, check the bike and go to the bathroom if you need to. Nibble on some crackers or trail mix to keep your energy up.
-Tools: Carry basic tools and emergency supplies and repair materials. You don't need a full set of tools, just the ones you're likely to need:
- Socket wrench with the common sizes of sockets your bike uses. In my case, 75% of the work can be done on my bike with the 10 and 12mm sockets and a 5mm hex.
- Common sized wrenches for places that a socket won't reach. Probably 10 and 12mm will do the job.
- Vice Grips
- Philips (for the brake and clutch reservoirs) and regular head (for the float drains and popping off covers and seals) screwdrivers.
- Some sort of multi-tool that includes a knife, pliers, file, scissors, etc.
- Small electrical tester.
- Wind up flashlight (especially one of those multi-ones that also has a weather radio and cell phone charger functions).
- Basic first aid kit.
- A few feet of duct tape.
- Small roll of electrical tape.
- Picture hanging wire.
- Spare fuses.
- Spare headlight bulb (anything else can wait til you get to an auto store).
- A tube of Hondabond (or Yamabond, if you prefer - same stuff).
- Small quantity of JB Weld.
- Cell phone. When all else fails, be prepared to call for help. You may want to consider a AAA membership. Just be sure to get the RV/Motorcycle plan or you'll be in trouble when you need a tow.​

A few other things:

- Carry $100 in cash at all times. If you have to pay for a tow upfront, run into a gas station where you can't pay by credit or need to pay a Montana speed fine, you'll want some cash. Some places just don't take credit for anything.
- Carry a credit card in case you have an expensive repair.
- Don't overdo it on clothes - that's what laundromats are for.
- Keep the weight low on the bike. That rack on the top of the trunk is asking for trouble. Also, balance the weight on each side.
- Got reflectors on the sides and backs of your saddle bags? Great! Now how about the bottoms? What if you go down on a dark road and the bike is laying in the road? Bikes aren't shiny on the bottom. A couple yellow reflectors on the bottoms of the bags might save your life.
- Go to the bike shop and ask to have a code key cut for your ignition. This is a key that is hand crimped, but is thinner than the key with the fat fob on it like your bike probably has. Place this extra key in your wallet or thread it into your boot laces - just in case.
 

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All of this advice is excellent but can be summed up here: a well prepared bike, spirit and time to get there and back, NO HURRY.
I've done this a number of times and your attitude towards the ride is everything.
Good Luck and enjoy, Hawk.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
thks

All good input..appreciate it!. I'm going to make a 'trial run' from NC to Pa in a couple weeks...610 miles each way. Than who knows from there...
 

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Riding daily
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Not quite coast to coast, but my wife and I will be taking around a 5.5K mile trip this summer that will take us from

Orem, UT---Mesa Verde, CO---Roswell, NM---Dallas, TX---New Orleans, LA---Dothan, AL---Titusville, FL---Key West, FL---Titusville, FL---Charleston, SC---Deals Gap, NC---Memphis, TN---Lake St Louis, MO---Liberty, MO---Longmount CO---Orem, UT

all in that order. We plan on being on the road for 3-4 weeks. We have up to 6 weeks off. Should be a blast!
 

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For the past 9 years the wife and I have taken a ride of 2weeks for our vacation, this is the first summer we won't be going. We decided to take our oldest son and his family for a stay at a beach house instead. This was an idea that had been cooking for a while so with the economy looking unstable we felt the time was right.

I will surely miss my summer time "cruise" but we'll pick back up next summer.In the mean time I'll make do with day trips and weekend rides thru the N.C. mtn.s and around S.C. and Ga. . Most of our rides have taken us @ 5,000 mi. but we have places yet to discover so beware we may be coming to your town. Hawk
 

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Poser Proud®
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Nope, direct run from Galveston, Tx. to San Diago, Ca. (about 1600 miles one way) on a Moto Guzzi 850. Lots more unreliable back in the 70s than todays bikes. Went all over the place on an old chopped, oil leaking Triumph 650.

Bikes now are very reliable. I would make sure to have a cell phone and AAA or some road service available - just in case. Others have talked about tools etc. so I won't go into that. Normally I don't carry much extra as far as tools go. Good flashlight, small first aid kit. Just remember - don't think that you have to be somewhere no matter what the cost. Tired - rest Hungry -eat.

Most of all have fun and have a good adventure.
 

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Thats actually something I've had in mind if i can get some riding partners to go with me. I live in Northern VA and I'd love to ride to the Pacific and back. but i also need to get some long rides in, so far, havn't been on the bike for more than an hour or two at a time.
 
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