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Yes there is something else you could try. As noted in another post :

"If you have enough patience, you could try repeatedly nudging the timing while trying to start the bike. I cannot remember how long the adjustment slots were but if you moved the plate 1/16" at a time you might find you can get it to run and then you can use a strobe light to time it accurately. Zero cost but lots of time needed."

Here is the procedure.

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Does this bike have Reed valves? From what I have read it does, and if those aren't working, the bike will not run. I don't know the bike well enough, but there are listings for Reed Valves for that bike. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
Does this bike have Reed valves? From what I have read it does, and if those aren't working, the bike will not run. I don't know the bike well enough, but there are listings for Reed Valves for that bike. :)
Later models of this bike were equipped with reed valves, this model doesn’t have them though. I’ll try the method of adjusting the timing manually this weekend.
 

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Check out the KCVJMC.com website, there are some people in the Kansas City branch that are very knowledgeable on the older bikes. (One of the guys had something like 26 or so vintage Japanese bikes at one time...)
 

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Discussion Starter · #46 ·
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i popped my stator cover off, mine doesn’t look the same as that one in the picture. I think that picture and process of adjusting the timing is for a bike equipped with points rather than CDI.
 

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It looks like you have the newer style magneto flywheel. With yours you have to remove the flywheel to gain access to the 3 screws. Otherwise the procedure is the same.

There is another way to set the timing but that involves finding exact top dead center and being able to measure precisely a certain distance before top dead center. It requires special tools.
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 · (Edited)
Things have gone…poorly. Last weekend I got my hands on a flywheel puller and began the process of trying to remove the flywheel. After getting the puller set up and cranking away, I noticed that it was taking quite a bit of force on my part, so I slowed down. The next couple hours I spent slowly trying to work the flywheel off while also spraying some PB around the area to try and loosen things up. Eventually though, one of the three removal bolts broke, although I was able to re-tap the hole and use a larger bolt. Even still, the **** flywheel wouldn’t budge. It’s maybe come out like a couple millimeters, and unfortunately I think it’s gotten a little crooked in the process. I went back and then tried to re-screw the main nut back on the crankshaft, but it appears that, in the process of using the flywheel puller, it’s actually widened the end of the crankshaft and the nut no longer fits properly.

I’m afraid I’ve just f&@(ed this thing.
 

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Flywheels that are rusted on can be PIA to remove, but also yours may be extra tough if the flywheel key has partially seized which would throw the timing way off. If you think you moved it by a few mm, then it must be a sheared key that is preventing it from coming off.

Did you take any pictures of the puller and the setup you had? Would be nice to see them. It is important to keep all three arms parallel to the face of the flywheel, otherwise it won't pull straight.

First I would measure carefully to see if the flywheel is crooked. If so, you may have to gently tap it with a soft face hammer, or try to use the puller to exert more force on one side to correct the misalignment.

I hate to advise anyone to tap on the flywheel (its bad for the magnets) but you may have no choice. Once you have it straight, put force on it with the puller and hit the end of the main puller bolt with some good hits and then see if you can get another part turn on the bolt. If so, keep doing that. If that is not working you may have to add tapping on the diameter of the flywheel with a soft face hammer while also hitting the end of the puller bolt.

The crank threads can probably be fixed but you might as well continue with flywheel removal at this point.
 

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If the Key way is visible, take a small drill and drill it out. Go up to the biggest size you can without touching the crank. This will allow heat to expand it at a different weight, and possibly allow you to spin it back in the direction it spun into. This is a big problem, hitting the Magneto can damage the Magnets, but if you do hit it, have on the opposite size something pushing against the flywheel, so that when you hit it, it may pop off. I have done this with many Briggs and Stratton motors that sheered the key pin. I drove a wedge into one side, then hit on the exact, 180 degrees from the wedge, and the flywheel pops right out. You don't have many options, other than getting a new crank, magneto, and essentially rebuilding the engine. Sounds like you have, and it seems that it may have inevitable, found out this is beyond repair.
 

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Unfortunately with this design, the key, keyway and taper are totally inaccessible.

Impact on the puller bolt may be the saviour. If only a couple of threads on the crank are bad, it might be possible to restore them or they could be ground off. Let's hope for the best. The OP needs to catch a break soon or he will give up.
 

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If you could slide 1/8th steel strips underneath, for the screws to hit, and then put pressure (a lot), then apply a lot of heat, the pressure may pop it off. Apply the heat too the outside, not the crank shaft. That will not get larger like the flywheel could. An Ice Cube on the end of the Crank may help. You don't get that off, start looking for a new engine. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #55 ·
I hate to say it, but I think given how difficult it’s been dealing with this current engine, that buying a replacement engine might be the lesser of two evils. I’m kind of at the point mentally where it’s kind of a sunk cost. Is there a way to determine whether or not an engine is compatible with this particular frame or should I just stick to trying to find another Kawasaki 175CC engine? Would a KE250 engine, for example, work?
 
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