Kawasaki Motorcycle Forums banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all
Not sure if this has been covered in the past, I did search but didn't find anything. I recently replaced stock rear indicators with Oxford Nightrider led jobs. Came with flash rate resistor, both work perfectly. Came to swap the front with the same, and they don't flash correctly. Have tried with or without resistor, same flash rate. Also used the other unit in the pack to rule out fault on the one installed (lhs) but still the same. The bike was stock when I bought it, with no signs of any previous after market butchery....Anyone have any ideas ? Thanks in advance. D.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
10,935 Posts
When you say "don't flash correctly", what exactly do you mean?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
832 Posts
The resistors defeat the main reasons for the LEDs. The beauty of LEDs is they run cold and consume very little current(Energy). When you add the resistors, they do exactly as the incandescent were doing or worse: waste at lot of energy in heat. Am not saying this is your problem. Am only saying, if you go with compensating resistors, might as well keep the stock inefficient incandescent..... THEIR RED HOT FILAMENTS ARE THE RESISTORS.

Want to start doing it right? Get a proper electronic flasher not sensitive to load and ditch the resistors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi all, thanks for your replies...needed an extra resistor to cure hyper flashing on front indicators. All working now.thanks again
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
10,935 Posts
The resistors defeat the main reasons for the LEDs. The beauty of LEDs is they run cold and consume very little current(Energy). When you add the resistors, they do exactly as the incandescent were doing or worse: waste at lot of energy in heat. Am not saying this is your problem. Am only saying, if you go with compensating resistors, might as well keep the stock inefficient incandescent..... THEIR RED HOT FILAMENTS ARE THE RESISTORS.

Want to start doing it right? Get a proper electronic flasher not sensitive to load and ditch the resistors.
Not entirely correct. The electronics of LED bulbs can get quite hot. That's why many LED headlight bulbs come with fans.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
As I see it, there are only three valid reasons to go to LED lights. Looks, safety or reducing load due to added electrical accessories. You are NOT necessarily doing your charging system any favors by changing to LEDs. The electrical system is designed for a particular load when running normally. It should be able to keep the bike running and charge the battery in normal use.

Most bikes use a 3 phase stator with permanent magnet flywheel. Unlike a car alternator with a variable field voltage to control output, in a permanent magnet system the ac current generated is solely dependent on RPM regardless of load on the system, It's up to the rectifier to convert the ac voltage to DC and regulate it to ideally 14V dc. Most are shunt type rectifiers which convert the ac, regulate it to the 14v DC and dissipate any excess current as heat through the rectifier's internal shunt resistor circuitry to ground. Thus the fins on the rectifier,,, Reducing the load can cause the rectifier to work harder,

The Mosfet type rectifiers on newer models have been reported to dump the excess back into the stator windings where the heat is dissipated into the oil which is supposed to be cooling the stator and can cause the stator to run hotter. Also not a good thing.

By all means LEDs can be a good thing if you've added electrical accessories and need to rebalance the load.. They can also improve safety as brake lights, which have limited usage. They will light noticeably faster than incandescents. Could be the difference between the guy behind you hitting you or stopping 6" from your rear fender...

And note, just converting the turn signals and running lights may not be enough of a difference to matter. Normal tail or running lights are around 3 watts each filament, so if two taillight bulbs and 2 front running lights, around 12 watts. (approx 1 amp) draw. Turn or brake filaments are right at 21w each, but have limited use... Stator output ratings I've seen are in the 300 to 360 watt range.

Sorry, it's late and I'm rambling again...
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,570 Posts
It is an interesting ramble 9094 and I enjoyed reading it.

I must admit I was shocked to learn that some "newer" bikes are incorporating their regulator/rectifiers with the alternator and wondered about heat dissipation. Instead of being mounted up on the frame somewhere where they are exposed to a flow of cooling air, they put them inside a hot engine case? Seemed to make no sense. The new location is also harder to get to for replacement.

And while I ramble, I have another reason to switch to LED's that applies to vintage bikes. Our old, tired bikes suffer from corroded connections and anything we can do (short of replacing all connectors) to reduce the load on the wires is a good thing in my opinion. Bear in mind, I am not an expert at electronics so if I am wrong in that regard, feel free to correct me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
I changed to LED headlight to help with overheating! Sound strange? Well, where I live the temp is 30's- 40's all year round and that means the fan is running effectively all the time. There is also a law that means you must have your headlight on all the time. Add that to constant stop start traffic and I was finding that my charging system struggled. Just a small drop in power caused the fan to run slightly slower and thereby the bike overheated in traffic. By fitting an LED headlight the and the associated drop in power consumption the fan runs at full speed all the time and no more overheating. This change was accompanied by renewal of every element of the cooling system and now I have no issues at all. The LED itself is bright and the light pattern is really effective. Happy chap all round. The bike is a ZZR 1100 D.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
I changed to LED headlight to help with overheating! Sound strange? Well, where I live the temp is 30's- 40's all year round and that means the fan is running effectively all the time. There is also a law that means you must have your headlight on all the time. Add that to constant stop start traffic and I was finding that my charging system struggled. Just a small drop in power caused the fan to run slightly slower and thereby the bike overheated in traffic. By fitting an LED headlight the and the associated drop in power consumption the fan runs at full speed all the time and no more overheating. This change was accompanied by renewal of every element of the cooling system and now I have no issues at all. The LED itself is bright and the light pattern is really effective. Happy chap all round. The bike is a ZZR 1100 D.
side note on cooling and fans: Had a Vulcan 800A years ago, When I got it the cooling fan would come on as soon as I left the highway and hit the 1st stop light on my daily commute. Bike was used with around 4000 miles on it. So should have been broken in good. I changed to Amsoil's full synthetic motorcycle oil shortly after, then noticed my fan had quit coming on at the normal stoplight location, In fact, I didn't hear it coming on at all any more even during the rest of my commute through town. Thought the fan or sensor had gone bad so one day I was a bit early, pulled off at that 1st stop light and left it running in the sun with temps around 95F, it took another 5 to 10 minutes for the fan to kick in. (long time ago, memory,,,) Only change was the full synthetic oil.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top