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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all, I'm new to the motorcycle scene and I just got the Ninja EX500 as my first bike.

I'm about 5'4 or 5'5, and weigh about 145 lbs.

My problem is I keep dropping the bike because it's so heavy when I come to a stop or when I push it in neutral, is this because I need to work out more?

Another issue I am having is my height. I can't really flat foot on the ground and I am on my tippy toes. I am considering lowering the bike a foot or so, if I do am I able to only lower the rear? Does it affect handling? Will it help me against dropping the bike?

Anyone have any links for some good and cheap lowering links for the Ninja EX500? And also some turn signal cases? I dropped my bike the first night at a stop sign and it broke my front turn signal cases, my friends said their just about $10
 

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I miss you, Deron
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I don't know that much about sportbikes, but I doubt you can lower it a foot!

Maybe you'd be better off with a cruiser, which you should easily be able to flatfoot.
 

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I assume you are joking about a foot :) I am an OLD MAN :) but a little taller and slightly heavier and it fits me PERFECT, so if you lower both ends a little you will be good. Like NCDave said, once lowered it will be much easier. Tippy toes is not good. Especially for a beginner.

Have you taken the MSF class? If not SIGN UP NOW. Ask, and they will give you clues. Like do not stop the bike with the wheel turned.

There is a metal insert in the base of the turn stalk. If you remove that, it is said that it makes it harder to break the fairing if the bike falls. Replacing the fairing costs some bucks.

Beyond that... take it slow. Take your time so you can build some confidence. The 500 is an AWESOME little bike. I’ve had mine just over a year and 12,000 miles and I do not see me ever “outgrowing” the thing.

Enjoy!
Brian
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I ment an inch, woops lol. I asked my friend and he told me to stop with one foot on the ground and the other foot up. I might try that.

Also, I have no friction zone. I emailed the guy I bought it from he's around 40 or 50 and he said he's never heard of a friction zone. Basically I can't ride on my friction zone, it doesn't even ease forward and I was wondering if I could fix that. My friend said I could fix the clutch, let it loose or tighten it or something.
 

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I ride what I like
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I'm 5'6" and 135lbs and I handle my almost 500lbs VFR just fine.

Are you putting your feet down too slow or at different rates of speed?

I would not recommend putting just one foot down when coming to a stop. It's just like a bicycle. When you're almost stopped, you just ease both feet down. If you keep going a little, DONT FREAK. Just walk with the bike until you stop.
 

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An inch sounds more reasonable :) The clutch might be looking for an adjustment, but I am thinking that if the clutch is fully engauged when you are not touching the lever, and fully released when the lever is pulled in, it is probably OK? Are you sure it is not just needing a bit of a "touch" on the lever? Holding the RPM at like 2k with the throttle, and VERY slowly releasing the clutch the engine starts to bogg and the bike to move a little, yes? With no friction zone, it is hard to imagine being able to get the bike going from a standstill. MSF class is your friend :)

Brian
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
It's just that my inseam is really short, I think I'll try to one foot it tonight at a stop. Also, it's really heavy to move when in neutral as well, should I get off and go on the left hand side to push it instead of my with my legs while on the bike on my tippy toes?

It's just that when I hold the clutch in, and slowly release it (I'm following what I do in MSF class even though it might not be the same bike) I moves about a inch and right at the moment I have to give it gas or else it'll stall.

In MSF class I rode a Yamaha Star and I could easily go 5 or more feet with the friction zone but with this I can barely go an inch without giving it gas.


Also, I think I've stalled too many times as I called the guy cause it wouldn't start and it kept giving me a clicking noise. He said I ran my battery too many times so either: Jump start it, recharge it, or run start it or something where you roll down a slope or have someone push you and while in first.

So should I just save all the trouble and get a new battery? If so how much would it cost?
 

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Go to ex-500.com and look a member named FOG. He is GOD when it comes to the 500R. Ask him for pricing on his lowering links (dog bones). He machines them himself and there are a lot of people who will attest to the high quality of his work.
If you plan on keeping one foot up be prepared for two things: being able to see which way the street is slanted so that you know which foot to put down and be prepared to drop the bike plenty more times unless you lower it anyway.
You might try some riding boots; the thick soles along with the heel might be enough to help you keep the bike upright.

Wow, not bad for using my BB Tour at Disneyland to type this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Yeah, I've tried charging the battery. It worked for a couple of times. But I guess I stalled out too much again, I have to get used to giving it some gas and holding it there and then releasing the clutch.

I guess i'm out to buy a new battery tomorrow.

I'll look up FOG, thanks

EDIT I forgot to mention I'm also wearing steel toed boots as well and it's still too big for me
 

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BACK ON TWO WHEELS
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dont lower the forks more than a 1/4 in for every in lower in the dogbones...

to lower the rear, you need a set of "lowering links" which are called dogbones because of the shape of the part. its very simple to do, provided you have a stand to support the rear. you may not even need to lower the front forks.

My wife is 5-4 and 125 and handles here 485 lb cruiser and her 2007 CBR600RR just fine. You need to become acclimated to balancing the bike and coming to a stop...YOU practice this in the MSF course...which, if you havent taken it, you should soon! It will teach you the fundamentals of motorcycle handling and more important, safety!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I've taken it last weekend but we've used cruisers, I used a Yamaha star. It was fairly easy to use because it was small 250 that I could flat foot, easy friction zone that I could ride for about 10 feet. it's just that when I come to a stop I put both feet down and I can't flat foot it like normal I have to tippy toe it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Went to advance auto parts, checked the battery and they said it was no good. So I went ahead and bought a new one for $46, didn't know how to fill it up with electrolytes at first but then I got it. Now it's running great. I think it also fixed my friction zone but I'm not sure.

Now I just need to lower it so I can flat foot it.
 

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I ride what I like
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Went to advance auto parts, checked the battery and they said it was no good. So I went ahead and bought a new one for $46, didn't know how to fill it up with electrolytes at first but then I got it. Now it's running great. I think it also fixed my friction zone but I'm not sure.

Now I just need to lower it so I can flat foot it.

I hope you got a non-servicable battery (the one with out a tube). If you didnt just keep an eye on where vent hole is and watch for leakage. Battery acid + anything = damage.
 

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I'm your Huckleberry
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Keep your head and eyes up when coming to a stop. Don't look down at the pavement, or at your front tire...look straight forward. Trust me, that makes the biggest difference when it comes to stability coming to a stop.

Friction zone: Are you sure you aren't feeling the clutch start to grab, then letting go of the lever? I did that when I first started...let it out slow until I felt it grab, then just let it out all the way...always stalled it. Wasn't until I learned to hold it there that it worked. You may also just need to raise the RPMs while holding it in the friction zone.

Stopping with one foot on the ground? Easily done...but you may have to practice how to stop your bike to ensure it always leans left. Right foot should remain on the foot brake. I used 2 feet at stops when I had my 900 Custom, but as soon as I got my ZX-14, it was just entirely natural to just put down the left foot. Only time my right foot comes off the peg is coming to a stop after a long ride (to stretch out my leg).

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks for all your help guys, I think I just have problems with stopping now. I might take it to a dealership with my friend since he's buying a bike there and ask them if they can lower it and how much it'll cost.

Also, if I lower it an inch, would I have to buy a new kickstand?
 
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