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Discussion Starter #1
Well I was hoping I had the budget to get a hard cab for plowing this winter as it gets pretty harsh and cold especially at night here in the Catskill Mountains, but I have been shopping for a soft cab to help a bit with the elements.

I guess two questions:

Best and most enclosed soft cab for the mule

Any chance I could heat it even slightly with a soft cab.

A lot of times I am plowing through the night to keep my road clear and my old bones feel it.

Thanks love this forum luckily haven't needed it much the ol' mule has been great!
 

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I went through the same questions you are, and ended up buying a full blown Kawasaki soft cab and doors off Ebay for under $300. I would look there first and save a ton of money.

As far as heating it goes, the soft cabs heat way better than the metal cabs. They are less conductive of the heat so keep it in. The best heaters I have found are from a company by the name of Harold Electric in Walla Walla, Washington. They make heavy duty agricultural heaters that really work. The puny Kawasaki heater is a waste of time. Put the HECO heater in and disconnect your radiator fans and cover the radiators and the heater will keep the cab so warm it will melt snow off the roof and you will have to flip open your drivers window to stay comfortable in weather down well below zero.

The only change I will be doing is to install a glass windshield and a big single marine wiper that hits the entire thing. The Plexiglas and plastic windshields get scratched and turn fuzzy in about six months. The door and back windows are just fine in that floppy plastic stuff as they get less abrasion.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks RCW! I have read some of your posts and your information is great. I would have thought trying to heat a soft cab would be like trying to heat the outdoors. So great info makes sense. I noticed some cover the Air intake on the top back part of the roll cage. Does the Kawasaki have the opening in the cab for the intake?

Question on the soft cab: Have you looked at the Quad Gear cab it's only 219 and seems a little better than the Kawasaki cab?

I went and checked those heaters and thats a great find, price is right for sure.

Thanks again
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Also I agree with the plastic windshield- can you incorporate the soft cab with a plastic windshield? Thanks!
 

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I have not seen the Quad Gear cab, except on the ATV style four wheelers. The price is sure right! The deal with the ones I have seen on the ATV was that the windshield was hot sealed to the plastic material of the cab and required a top shop to sew on a flap and make a velcro arrangement to remove the windshield to replace it with a marine material plastic substitute every year when it turns gray and you can no longer see through it. No big deal, just something to think about if the one for the Mule is the same way.

There is a slit and flap arrangement on mine, it just slides sort of over the snorkel so it is exposed to the outside air. Since it was second hand, I really do not know if the other guy did that or if Kaw thought ahead.

Kawasaki makes a soft plastic windshield for the soft cab, but I would avoid all plastics and go to an automotive glass shop and get a tempered glass cut to fit the front roll cage. I intend to set my glass about ten inches above the hood, and all the way to the top. Believe it or not, chain link fence panel brackets work great to hold the glass to the roll bar, but require rubber insulators to keep the bolt and hole in the glass from colliding and breaking the glass. Then I will use a boat fabric chunk to fit below the windshield and above the hood, and velcro to hold it to the windshield and to the roll cage. Then just let it snap on the hood with velcro tabs to keep it secure. I tried one of those high dollar glass windshields that fit the full opening and have the gas struts, but at zero the gas struts conk out and it is like pulling teeth to get the windshield open to get the hood open to reach my spotting scope and extra supplies. I did the same thing for my last Polaris after trying to use their goofy OEM glass windshield too.

You will notice I like velcro, when it is sleeting and ice is building up the velcro still works while zippers and snaps freeze solid. I also carry a few bungies just in case.
 

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I went through the same questions you are, and ended up buying a full blown Kawasaki soft cab and doors off Ebay for under $300. I would look there first and save a ton of money.

As far as heating it goes, the soft cabs heat way better than the metal cabs. They are less conductive of the heat so keep it in. The best heaters I have found are from a company by the name of Harold Electric in Walla Walla, Washington. They make heavy duty agricultural heaters that really work. The puny Kawasaki heater is a waste of time. Put the HECO heater in and disconnect your radiator fans and cover the radiators and the heater will keep the cab so warm it will melt snow off the roof and you will have to flip open your drivers window to stay comfortable in weather down well below zero.

The only change I will be doing is to install a glass windshield and a big single marine wiper that hits the entire thing. The Plexiglas and plastic windshields get scratched and turn fuzzy in about six months. The door and back windows are just fine in that floppy plastic stuff as they get less abrasion.
Would this heater be the Red Dot R-270 on this page?
Red Dot Heaters from Harold Electric

Will this take up much more room than the Kawasaki heater?
Thanks
Surf
 

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I used a version of the 255, but my hunting buddy used the smaller R256. Both take more room than the puny Kaw heater, but they also put out real heat!
 
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