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hi everyone i bought a 2005 brute force 650 but it has a few issues! i was hoping you all can help me! first off the kid put his own air intake (pvc pipe) from the bottom of the motor to a hole he made in the front fenders! airbox is just open i have to say! on the rite side of the footpeg the plastic belt shield has a vent on it and it is just hanging there! where does it go? wheeler starts hard and im thinking its from the airbox being modified! once you get it started about 5 min! if you ride it and get heat into the motor it starts rite up after that! but if you let it sit then hard to start again! any wisdow for me or i bought a pos? thx!
 

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My recommendation is to go to Kawasaki.com and follow the Owner Info link to the parts diagrams. Pull and print diagrams for the Air Cleaner, the Carburetor, Carburetor Parts, and the Converter Cover.

Then go through a process of identification and elimination of what you find on yours versus what should be installed. Then make a list and buy the OEM replacements to make yours whole again.

A very common problem is that kids believe they can improve air flow and increase power by modifying the air intake system. This does not work because the carburetors are designed as part of an entire complex set of components that includes the full air intake system, then ends up running seriously lean when that system is opened up, which results in overheating the combustion chambers and taking the temper out of the rings and/or eroding the piston crowns to the point compression drops and then an expensive rebuild is required.

If you are fortunate you may have caught this problem early enough that significant engine damage has not yet been done.

Even with the correct air management and intake system installed these are difficult to start when cold. It is because of the EPA compliance standards and very lean pilot circuits in the carburetors, and the reliance on a small control jet called the Jet-air leak, that must be kept clean of any debris.

What I recommend is that the pilot air screw be backed out and additional quarter to half turn, and the pilot jet be reamed one full wire size over where it is today once the air intake plumbing has been returned to stock.

Obviously, if the compression is low it will continue to be a beast to start and will require a top end rebuild to correct the deficiency.
 
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