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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Suggestions please.

I bought my son a new 2004 Ninja 250 last week. He is a new rider and rode it for a few days up and down the street. The other day he tried to start it, and it would not turn over. It cranks, but it won't start.

Dealer thinks the plug could be fouled. He suspects that my son did not turn off the choke. He wants me to bring it in, and he said he would have to charge me! I don't think I should have to pay, but how will I know if it was my sons fault or not?

Is it as difficult as my dealer says to change the spark plug myself on this bike?
 

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All you need to do is take off the tank. It isnt too difficult of a process if you have some instructions.
Also make sure the engine isnt hot when you try unless you enjoy pain. (That shouldnt be a problem since it wont even start :lol: )
 

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same for the 250...
 

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WHOA! Try the cheap-fix first. Before you take off the tank or take the bike to the dealer$hip, simply de-flood it:

With the choke in the off position, twist the throttle all the way open and crank the starter for a few (5-7) seconds. Have a loose grip on the throttle and be prepared to let go immediately in case the engine decides to start up. Repeat this process twice for about 5 seconds and it should clear it out. Then let the bike stand still for a few dozen minutes.

Once you've done this, open the choke up half-way and start as normal (not twisting the throttle at all.)

This might sound like I'm setting you up for some sick joke, but what you're doing is clearing the chambers of excessive gas. Your sparkplugs are almost certainly fouled from using the choke for too long and by opening the throttle all the way with the rpms turning comparitively slowly, you're allowing a lean fuel-air mixture to enter the chambers. Do this in a well-ventilated area, as the unburnt fuel in the chambers will be flowing out the exhaust and you will get the gasoline smell.

Some people seem to have the incorrect idea that it's good for a bike to let it idle for a long time to warm-up gradually with the choke on. Start the bike up and don't let it idle for longer than it takes to put on your helmet and gloves. Then ride gently away and turn off the choke completely once you've surpassed 4,000-rpm the first time.

Here's an article from a very smart man named Gordon Jennings for breaking-in (and starting) your new motorcycle:
http://www.chrisandlisachan.com/break-in-game.htm

Good luck and let us know how it goes!
-Calamari Chris in Carlsbad, CA
 

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P.S. If this 250 is a new bike, it almost certainly is your son's fault, but this is such a simple mistake for a new rider (even an experienced one) to make. Entirely forgivable. The legendary Malcolm Smith forgot to turn his fuel petcock on when making his first run up the Widowmaker in the movie On Any Sunday.
You're a good Pa for helping his kid out. Would you like to adopt a moderately-irresponsible 35-year-old kid?

-CCinC
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks guys.

I took the battery to the dealer so he could OFFICIALLY charge it correctly. I then put it into the bike and tried it both with the choke on, and with the choke off opening the throttle.

No luck :(

The bike has only 15 miles on it. Could the plugs have fouled this quickly? The dealer said that new bikes have lots of extra oil in the engine and unless this is burned off, the plugs could indeed be fouled.

Looks like I'm trucking it back to the dealer. :evil:
 

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well if they prepped the battery like we used to at the old dealer i worked at they you would be lucky to get 6 months out of it anyways.
since its been dead ti will never be CORRECT. the only way to make it correct is to do a NEW battery and charge it correctly.
as for the plugs, yes i agree they could be fouled now (oil or gas) since you only have 2 just replace them with NGK's. :wink:
 

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Remove your seat.
Remove the bolts from the rear end of the tank (10mm I think)
Turn the fuel tap to the off position.
Tilt the tank out the rear of the frame.

Keep an eye out for two rubber dampers that hold the front part of the tank in place - they have a tendency to roll off and not be seen.

Disconnect the battery for safety and gently remove the coils - get out your handy dandy spark plug remover and have at it.

Spark plug gap should be set at .6 - .7mm

Good luck
 
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