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Never quite fixed.
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Discussion Starter #1
Last winter I had some trouble with my front brakes sticking. It turns out the cables were fine, it was the cams that were sticking. I took off the hub, then the pads, and removed the cam. It had some gum so I cleaned it up some and put some motor oil on the shaft and O-rings and put it back together. It worked for awhile but now it started sticking again. I took it apart again last weekend and did the same thing, except I used power steering fluid instead. Now they gummed up again and stick. I don't know what to do next at this point. The pads still have good friction material on them. What is the best lube to use on the cams? Both O-rings are in good shape. I do go through water sometimes, but that's what the O-rings are for aren't they? This is on a 1999 Bayou 220.

I'm also having some trouble with my idle. It will idle perfectly fine when on choke. But if the engine is cold it will not idle at all until 10 minutes of riding. Even then it misses and will stall sometimes. I'm guessing the idle jet is probably clogged, but I cleaned the carb just a couple weeks ago. When i did that it was clogged. I don't understand how it could be clogging. I checked the petcock and the screens were clean on it, i also have a Kohler fuel filter installed. I noticed there is an air vent looking thing on the side of the carb. It is grey colored and when you turn the carb upside down gas comes out of it. It is on the same side as the fill line. Should I have a hose attached to this? I have it just open, I had some trouble with my top end RPM's a while ago while mudding. Everything was coated in mud or pond water. Maybe crud is getting in through that vent?
 

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By brake cams I suspect you mean the shafts where they go through the backing plate with the brake shoes on one side and the actuation levers on the other.

If the above is correct, any good grade grease on those pivot points will keep them free. They do require greasing about once a year. If you have access to a John Deere dealer, they make a graphite paint product called Slip Plate that can be sprayed on the shafts and allowed to dry before assembling, and that lasts about three years in wet riding.

I am not sure which carburetor you have, but some do have bowl vents that are open to the atmosphere. It is a good idea to attach a length of fuel line to those open vents to keep dust, dirt, and mud from infiltrating and ending up in the fuel bowl.
 

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Never quite fixed.
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496 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
That is correct about the cams.

So you think normal grease will do the job? I have marine grease that I used on the lugnuts and hub shafts. Will that work?
 

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Marine grease will work just fine for the annual service.
 
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