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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Tried searching, must be the only one that needs to ask questions about this...

Goodridge braided. Couple of things...

1) On the junction box....do you use any teflon tape when putting the nipples into the junction box?
2) Can you twist the cables? The ends don't line up nearly where they need to be to match both the caliper and the junction box. Have to twist one of them about halfway around to get the upper part to screw into junction.
 

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Does it have banjos at the end that can be loosened and rotated? I'm not an expert, but I do not know that a twist like that would be good?

Brian
 

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Crazy Old Guy
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You shouldn't have to use teflon tape on a brake line.
 

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BACK ON TWO WHEELS
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never use teflon tape with brake lines....

and go to Goodridge website for instructions on how to adjust (twist) cant remember, I have had HEL, Goodridge, Spangler and they are all a little diff
 

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Army Strong. Ride Long
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Yes, You can twist the ends. I had to do the same thing.
Take a wash cloth, fold it over a few times and wrap it around the knurled end that is on the hose at the base of the banjo. Take pretty stout pliers and hold the knurled end tight, but not so tight you crush it. You'll be able to tell.
Next, put a dowl (or I used a rubber coated screw driver) into the banjo and twist slowly but firmly in the direct you want to go. Move in small increments; go back and check the alignment. You can do this a few times without worry. Make sure you GO IN THE SAME DIRECTION. DO NOT REVERSE THE TWIST. That is what ruins the connection and causes leaks and a loose fit. It crucial you go slow and move in small amounts so you don't have to back it up because you over shot your alignment.
These are from a tech at Goodridge.

And like V2K said, no teflon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yes, You can twist the ends. I had to do the same thing.
Take a wash cloth, fold it over a few times and wrap it around the knurled end that is on the hose at the base of the banjo. Take pretty stout pliers and hold the knurled end tight, but not so tight you crush it. You'll be able to tell.
Next, put a dowl (or I used a rubber coated screw driver) into the banjo and twist slowly but firmly in the direct you want to go. Move in small increments; go back and check the alignment. You can do this a few times without worry. Make sure you GO IN THE SAME DIRECTION. DO NOT REVERSE THE TWIST. That is what ruins the connection and causes leaks and a loose fit. It crucial you go slow and move in small amounts so you don't have to back it up because you over shot your alignment.
These are from a tech at Goodridge.

And like V2K said, no teflon.
Ok, that seems strange to me. The metal part seems to be soft aluminum and there seems to be NO way to hold it in place without damaging it. This advice seems wrong to me and way beyond my expertise. Not sure at all how it could be done without damage to the connection bit or the hose.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Starting to get a little put out over these lines. I ordered them custom for the Vulcan with extra length in them (+2"). I now have three sections that do not line up with each other in anyway. I can get two of the lines onto the tee junction but the third will just not make it.
If I run the upper line in the same route as the original...then it really is not 2" longer because the original had more metal pipe at bottom and they seem to have only counted the hose.
If I run the upper line slightly differently I get the length I need but the fitting is pointed in COMPLETELY the wrong direction.

So...plan B was to get some steel lines and make some U bends and an S bend to better fit the hoses. Turns out there are NO adapters to go from 3/16th male pipe to 3/16 male bubble. That was a waste of 4 hours of searching

Plan C was to find some short bits of steel braided to add into the over all length. I actually found some at a custom shop in town...but guess what...no one in town has any 3/16 unions so that I can splice in the extra 8" steel braided line.

FRICK

I will be calling Goodridge in morning and finding out why these hose fittings do not line up with each other at the tee fitting.

Turns out...I could have build a complete custom set with off shelf bits from this custom bike store for about $50 LESS!!!
 

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Army Strong. Ride Long
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Ok, that seems strange to me. The metal part seems to be soft aluminum and there seems to be NO way to hold it in place without damaging it. This advice seems wrong to me and way beyond my expertise. Not sure at all how it could be done without damage to the connection bit or the hose.
I was apprehensive too, but the hose ends are just crimped on and it does work. You won't damage it if you use a cloth and put enough pressure on it just to hold it. I've been riding with my hoses after twisting them for 8k miles and no leaks. Do what you think is best. The tech at Goodridge said they will twist them for me but it cost shipping, -plust down time. I was going to send them the OEM hoset to show their mistake. They would pay shipping back if it was wrong.
 

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I was apprehensive too, but the hose ends are just crimped on and it does work. You won't damage it if you use a cloth and put enough pressure on it just to hold it. I've been riding with my hoses after twisting them for 8k miles and no leaks. Do what you think is best. The tech at Goodridge said they will twist them for me but it cost shipping, -plust down time. I was going to send them the OEM hoset to show their mistake. They would pay shipping back if it was wrong.
For what it's worth, depending on the twist required you may not have to bother trying to twist the fitting, but if you do it should work with the swedged fittings.

As for the seal, there are soft aluminum (or copper) gaskets (look like common washers) that are fitted on each side of the fitting. Those will seal up the fitting. Remember, they go on both sides of the fittings, at a single fitting you will use two washers and I believe on a double fitting you will use three with one between the two banjos.
 

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Slow Guy on a Fast Bike
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Starting to get a little put out over these lines. I ordered them custom for the Vulcan with extra length in them (+2"). I now have three sections that do not line up with each other in anyway. I can get two of the lines onto the tee junction but the third will just not make it.
If I run the upper line in the same route as the original...then it really is not 2" longer because the original had more metal pipe at bottom and they seem to have only counted the hose.
If I run the upper line slightly differently I get the length I need but the fitting is pointed in COMPLETELY the wrong direction.

So...plan B was to get some steel lines and make some U bends and an S bend to better fit the hoses. Turns out there are NO adapters to go from 3/16th male pipe to 3/16 male bubble. That was a waste of 4 hours of searching

Plan C was to find some short bits of steel braided to add into the over all length. I actually found some at a custom shop in town...but guess what...no one in town has any 3/16 unions so that I can splice in the extra 8" steel braided line.

FRICK

I will be calling Goodridge in morning and finding out why these hose fittings do not line up with each other at the tee fitting.

Turns out...I could have build a complete custom set with off shelf bits from this custom bike store for about $50 LESS!!!

Best of luck trying to get any help from Goodridge. I ran into major fitment issues when installing the front Goodridge brake line on my old V2K. To say it didn't line up is an understatement. The lines did not come with the necassary "T", which they forgot to ship. When it finally arrived, it made no sense, didn;t line up properly, and had no means of attachement to the lower triple tree. My lower lines were identical, meaning that they wer both bent to fit well on one caliper.......so installing the one on the other side just didn't line up right. I called and emailed Goodrideg a number of times, and after receing no help whatsoever from multiple people there I gave up and vowed never to buy their products again.

Too bad I didn't know this prior to you ordering the Goodridge product, I would have offered my .02 then.
 

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Slow Guy on a Fast Bike
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By the b y, when it came to installing lines on my wife's old cruiser, I used a combination of Galfer lower lines and a generic Russell upper line. the cost was about 2/3 of the Goodridge lines, and amazingly it all fit.
 
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