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just curious to know how many of you followed the break in instructions on the speedometer on your new bike? mine says to stay between 0-4000 rpm for the first 500 miles - but sometimes i go above that.
 

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DRIVE IT LIKE YOUR GOING TO DRIVE LATER ON, I'VE DONE THIS WITH ALL MY STUFF BIKE ,CARS, TRUCK. NO PROBLEMS :lol:
 

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Break in

Following the suggested break in is there for a reason. Gears have to wear, the piston rings/cylinder wall must be considered...that is why you just can't take it out and thrash it from the beginning. Even new tires have a mold release on them. You can't just go out and lay the bike over all the way and know that the tires are going to do their job! Something to consider though is where are you riding? If you are in the flat desert, it's 105F for miles and miles it's not the same as being in Washington where it's damp, winding hills/mountains, 65F for miles. Common sense is a major factor. I get nearly ourtaged at the use of the word "AVERAGE" that Kawasaki uses and that the dealers are not alowed to go around because their hands are bound legally by the manufacturer. They can't recommend aftermarket parts that may affect the handling or operating of the motorcycle...AVERAGE...Consider, my analogy of the two different states. warming up the motor and loading/unloading it, warming/ cooling of it is required for metals to expand and contract...that is what happens...should you crack the throttle a little harder or not would depend upon many factors...what type of a load is on hte engine and how hot will it get....what about just coasting on downgrades like the Grapevine in California for miles, having to use your brakes or gearing to keep the bike slowed to an appropriate speed, versus the climb...one completely different situation than the other. I think (In my opinion) that putting a load on the bike to break it in, getting it warm/cool) is what the manufactures want. if you over-rev the motor you won't get as good a break in as you could if you didn't. Still you will find cars/bikes on the road that never exceed the federal speedlimit that are generations old, and have well over 200,000 miles on them. They wouldn't have the miles on them if you were to just go out and thrash them form the very beginning. We live in a disposable society today and most people don't use common sense, or Know better...they haven't had to think about it...it's just that way today. Paper plates and paper towles, or washing plates and napkins...just like diapers. C'mon, take a class in physics, science and see, learn how things work. Think about building a motor and visit a shop that rebuilds car motors and ask them some questions or just to tell you about how and why and what a proper break in is and why it is so important. Understand that it's not the 4,000RPM line that is so important but why or why not you could go beyond that in some circumstances. Kids andf adults today (still kids to me (I'm 51) just don't know any better and haven't been taught to think about how and why. Manufactures, dealers must be having nightmares with all of this, but what would you tell the "AVERAGE" motorcyclist?
 

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They had an article in the September Sport Rider that I thought was very good on break-in.

Quote.

“There are two aspects to break in that need to be considered, and they are at odds with each other. One is that to properly set the rings with the cylinder walls, sufficient load must be used to keep the rings in good contact with the cylinder – otherwise the walls will glaze and the engine will have less compression then it should. In contrast a light load is necessary so that various bearings and other internals can properly mate – putting to much load on a brand new tight-tolerance bearing will score the surface if there is even a slight imperfection that would other wise be removed with a light break-in.

We’ve seen bikes make more and more horsepower as the miles add up. A good indication that the break-in process takes place over an extended period of time. We recommend following manufactures method, but including the occasional medium-load run to higher revs to ward off cylinder glazing. Be certain to finish off this process with runs to redline under load as that will insure the final seating of the rings.”
 

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BREAKIN

HEY, I read that very same magazine and article! Nice to know! yeah, I read it and understand it. I also like to think that using a lighter viscosity oil would be benificial for break in, especially for the first 1,000 miles. You get lost of wear, and things are very close tollerance...warming up a bike before just taking off and several things of common sense is sorta included if you read it in...but liek some of our FORUM friends,,,break it in like you will ride it all the time...is not the way to properly get things done...Thanks for the support and your input as well...I hope that anyone out therethat buys a bike would read the manual before Ever riding it away from the shop...and then get a Service manual and read it before you get t your 600 mile point on the bike...
 
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