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Discussion Starter #1
I've never had to replace a chain before, can anyone tell me what the size means in terms of the difference between a 520, 525, 530, 630, etc? I can't find it anywhere.

I know the rear spocket has 39 teeth stock, and the chain has 102 links stock (87 ZX600)... but I'm just confused as to what chain I should purchase. Also, according to the Clymer repair manual I have this model uses an endless chain, and it recommends against installing a chain with a master link? The one on my ride of course has a master link... so advice in that area would be nice as well. Thanx in advance!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
chain size

Ok, thanx, I found that I need a 530 chain, and since it's originally an endless chain, I'm supposed to have a rivet type connecting link. Good to know, and knowing is half the battle.
 

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michiganarft11 said:
520, 530, etc. are lengths. A master link allows you to add more links to the chain.
I have to disagre on this one. The numbers (520, 530 ect) shows the actual size of the chain or width of the links, not how many are on the chain. Most chains for motorcycles are 100+ links. I bought a 112 link when I did my 520 conversion on my bike and I had to cut a few off to make it fit. Get a good riviting tool and it shouldn't be too hard.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
research

thanx man. I did some more research and found that the first digit of the "530" stands for the distance lengthwise in 8ths of an inch, so in this case 5/8ths... and the second is the width in 8ths... so again in this case 3/8ths. So a 525 is 5/8ths by 2.5/8ths (better known as 5/16ths). Unless of course the article was wrong... ?
 

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CHAIN

One important thing that if you can find the masterlink you can buy the new chain yourself and just measure it side by side...PROBABLY more important is the condition of your sprockets if you need a chain. the sprocket grooves should be almost perfect U shaped if they have a little bend/tilt to one side then Replace them, otherwise you will just be ruining a brand new chain. Another point is that chains are way under-lubes for the most part. Ask many of the long time riders here and you will get the same response. If you can hear your chain when you are riding, tehn it is time to lube it. Usually lube it in the evening after a ride while it is still warm that way in the morning it is cooled and has worked its way into all the places that it needs to be.
 

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Replacing the chain yourself isn't a hard thing to do. First get a Motion Pro Chain Riveting Tool. Then use a Dremel to grind off the post heads on the master link, and tap the link out of your old chain. Put the new chain on your bike and insert the master link into the chain. DO NOT press the link fully into place until you have checked the slack. If you use a clip type master link (usually what new chains come with) you use the chain riviting tool to press the master link into place and attach the clip. I have used clip type master links in the past and not had a problem, however, I have heard of them coming off. I would get a rivet type master link instead. Don't worry if you mess up your chain lenght (unless you cut it too short) you can get master links for cheap at any decent bike shop. Good luck.
 
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