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Strat Man ... ok, PRS too
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Discussion Starter #1
Short version:
I know you have to go to an auto glass shop. What next? What do I need to be asking? What's a reasonable price



Longer Version:

Settled on the Two Up. Like it a lot - I think I'm going to be able to ride with a shield this time around (never could in the past). I am 5'8" and looking through it. Knew when I got it I'd have to cut it down. Spent about 4 or 500 miles in dry weather thinking 3 or 4 inches. Glad I WAITED! Got caught in a heavy rain on Monday with my wife on the back. Realized that by only cutting 1 or 2 inches, I'll be just looking through and easily over the top by straightening up just a little and still being comfortable. Now it's time to follow through and take that 2 inches off.....
 

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If you are handy can roll on a few bits of 2" wide masking tape and have a saber saw, and can draw you can do it. I don't know what you do to earn a living, so I can't say if you should do it. If you make 2000 bucks an hour you should pay some guy, because in the 2 hours it takes you will loose yer shirt!

All the car glass guys do is tape up both sides, and draw a line, then cut it and they hand file the burrs off to a polish, when the edge is right they pull the tapes, and wash the screen.
 

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i've done it several times, the first time i paid to have it done and it ended up looking like ****, so now i do it myself and have never had a problem since.

like mac says tape it up, draw a line and use a fine tooth saw blade, i'm thinking about trying a router next time, not sure.......
 

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I had a master carpenter friend do mine. As Mac Muz said, masking tape, saber saw and my guy used a belt sander to get a better than factory edge on it. The man is a pro and everybody thinks the job was factory.
 

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frequently disturbs class
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Do a search in the cruiser forum- the cut-down has been well covered in the past. Just take your time and there's not much to it.
 

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A guy cutting loose with a belt sander better be really good.. To hold a screen on a bench well it needs blankets too, and should be ratchet tied down, so it doesn't get away.

Like most things the prep is time consuming, and boring. The saber saw bladw should be the one for fine wood working, aggressive but not overly so. You want it to cut, not melt, and not too course which will pull chips.

Double the tape layers so the guide table on the saw won't catch and dig thru any tape ever!

A sanding block will work wonders by hand.. Start with a good paper, around 100 grit and finish with up to 400 grit, or higher if you want.
 

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Strat Man ... ok, PRS too
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582 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Well, I appreciate the input, but was hoping there was an easy $40 solution.

So then, I have project skill, not in this area, but plenty of masking tape. The saw choices are circular or jig. Give me a suggestion and I'll make it happen.

Also have a metal hand saw, but I'm thinking that is probably not the way to go.

Any suggestiones on a good blade rating?

Cool stuff, just have to reshape my thinking. What blade am I looking for?
 

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Not so Newbie
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248 Posts
I took a Memphis Shades Big Shot shield and turned it into a custom sport shield. I have a lot of experience working with plastics. If you are only cutting the top you can do it with the shield installed on the bike. Doing so makes it less likely you will scratch the shield. Doing the cutting with the shield installed creates a sold support with out using vises or clamps. It also keeps everything up where you can see what you are doing and how it will look on the bike. The process is easy.

Before you start cover the tank and instruments with a blanket. use towels to cover the head light and anything else.

Cover the top of the shield with masking tape. Draw out what you want lightly in pencil first. when you have what you want to remove highlight that line with a black sharpie marker.

Cut on that line with a jig saw. A course metal cutting blade works well. Be as steady as you can but don't sweat it. it's going to be rough.

Use a flat file to even things out. The file only takes the high spots so it is easy to get a nice curve. After you have the curve use the file to round it over some.

Finish by scraping the filed edge with the back side of a hacksaw blade. Just hold it between two fingers on each hand and pull it toward you at a slight angle. You will know it is working when you see fine threads of acrylic peeling off.

No sandpaper needed and the finish will be better that original. You may have to scrape the sides of the shield too so it looks as good as what you cut.
 

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Try a plastics/sign shop. I had a place locally called Tap Plastics cut down my Memphis Shades and it was right around $40. Their cut looked better than the original.
 

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Premium Member
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I have a Friend that cut his down. Put masking tap on both sides, marked where he wanted to cut and cut it with a jig saw. Then carefully sanded down the edge.
 

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A saber saw and a Jig saw are the same thing. I did mention sanding, but scrapers work fine as well. The best of the best scrapers are just bits of broken glass. These have a right side and a wrong side naturally and need to be tested by trying one side then turning it to test the other side of a fresh break. If you try this method, try on the cut off piece first.

I make primitive self bows for shooting arrows this way and powder horns for flintlock guns this way as well. The glass will wear out in time, but I just select another bit. Don't get cut. If you do get cut, get it off the chrome ASAP. Blood eats metals fast. Skin heals.
 

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I cut mine down a month ago. The hardest part was overcoming the fear that I would screw it up! It's really quite easy.
1. Do it on the bike. Nice and stable
2. Drape a drop cloth over the bike. Plastic chips stick like mad to hot exhaust and engine
3. Cover the windshield inside and out with blue painters tape. Also cover the plate of the jigsaw.
4. Draw out your pattern on the tape.
5. Cut nice and easy. Small tooth blade and not too fast, you want to keep from melting the windshield.
6. I took off the high spots with a file, then course sandpaper, then fine paper. Don't forget to break the edges.
7. Take off the tape and clean up the mess.
8. Go out and enjoy the ride!
9. Before you start go to youtube and watch some videos! There are quite a few and they really help make you feel like you know what you are getting into.
Good Luck!
 

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Bug Killer Extraordinaire
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490 Posts
i've done it several times, the first time i paid to have it done and it ended up looking like ****, so now i do it myself and have never had a problem since.

like mac says tape it up, draw a line and use a fine tooth saw blade, i'm thinking about trying a router next time, not sure.......
you need to use something that cuts Slow!
when I tried to cut Plexiglas,it would cool after the cut and re-solidify a crossed the cut. router might work, as you are removing material
 

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Cutting too slow with a fine tooth blade on a jig saw will also let it melt back together. Too much vibration will crack the windsheild, if your mounts let it vibrate, take it off the bike. Take your time and make a practice cut above where you want the final cut. The hardest part is drawing a straight line to cut.
 

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VN 900 Classtom
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1,689 Posts
Looks simple if you have the right tools. If you don't have them then its probably cheaper to just buy a shorter shield replacement.
 
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