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I went to the Darkside about 2500 miles ago and like the ride. Today however, in the rain, I found the rear wheel locks up quite easily when braking. It had been raining for quite some time so surface oil wasn't an issue.
I riding on a Goodyear Assurance TT 205-60/16 at 37psi. If I lowered the psi would it stick better?
 

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Strange I usually have better grip but you do have more surface area which under correct conditions could put you up on top of the water instead of on the road.
 

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Low Voltage High Current
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I also, find that strange. I have 6000+ miles on darkside, finding to have better traction in both acceleration and braking on wet or dry pavement.

Was locking the rear up an isolated incident or does it do it frequently on wet pavement?
 

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I don't run a darkside tire but that does sound strange that it locked up quicker. Sure would think that better braking traction would be a + with a car tire.
 

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I'm your Huckleberry
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The braking tracion IS better. That's WHY it will consistently lock up easier in the rain.
I guess when you really think about it....................it does make sense.
You're thinking of braking torque...not tire friction (traction). If you have better brakes, then yes, its easier to lock up the wheel. But if you have increased tire traction (with no changes to the braking system), its much harder to lock up the wheels (think ice vs dry pavement).
 

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It's because the contact patch is flat. It's nice in the dry, but put a light dusting of sand or rain under it and you'll bust your a s s .
 

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Politicians' Nightmare
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The reported darkside rear wheel braking lockup problem is very interesting. Is the lockup due to the tire having been designed for a heavier vehicle as well as the wider, flatter contact area which could result in a diminished ability to wipe water off the roadway?
 

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You're thinking of braking torque...not tire friction (traction). If you have better brakes, then yes, its easier to lock up the wheel. But if you have increased tire traction (with no changes to the braking system), its much harder to lock up the wheels (think ice vs dry pavement).
True, true, Bubba. But increased tire friction requires increased braking torque. To stop the bike in the distance that he is used to stopping, he's hitting those brakes a lot harder... and because that back tire is so wide and so LIGHT, in wet conditions that added braking power is just ready and waiting to lock that thing up! He's gotta gradually reduce that rear brake power as the bike slows... sort of the reverse of staged braking... or similar to trail-braking. I would think on dry ground is it far less of an issue.

Dep
 

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Is it possible that there was just enough moisture on the brake rotor to cause it to lock up? I know that when the brakes get damp on my four wheel vehicles, they will lock up until they dry off.
 

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True, true, Bubba. But increased tire friction requires increased braking torque. Dep
:confused: No it doesn't. It allows greater braking torque to be applied to achieve shorter stopping distances...but there's no reason it would require greater braking torque to achieve the same stopping distance.
 

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So the much heavier tire as it's spinning makes no difference ? Brake pedal pressure is always the same regardless of the weight of the tire?

It's also possible the compound may be a factor, but I think brake pedal pressure is the real culpit... he's gotta back off those brakes as the bike slows down.

Dep
 

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True, true, Bubba. But increased tire friction requires increased braking torque.
Dep
:confused: No it doesn't. It allows greater braking torque to be applied to achieve shorter stopping distances...but there's no reason it would require greater braking torque to achieve the same stopping distance.
So the much heavier tire as it's spinning makes no difference ? Brake pedal pressure is always the same regardless of the weight of the tire?

It's also possible the compound may be a factor, but I think brake pedal pressure is the real culpit... he's gotta back off those brakes as the bike slows down.

Dep
Nope...if you look, I'm talking only of tire traction. You've now added in another variable with tire weight. And yes, a heavier tire will require more braking torque to slow the wheel/tire combo.
 

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Nope...if you look, I'm talking only of tire traction. You've now added in another variable with tire weight. And yes, a heavier tire will require more braking torque to slow the wheel/tire combo.
Yes, and of course on dry ground you're exactly right, the tire will be more difficult to lockup... on wet ground..,. fuhgeddaboutit!

The same pressure he's putting on the pedal when it's dry (and he's probably putting alot!) will cause it to lock up in the rain. That's my guess!

Dep
 

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Motorcycle tyres are stickier (known fact)

I thought about going dark side because o was tired of getting 9000 miles from a cycle tire but after talking to my Continental rep (i am in the tire business) I decided to stick (no pun intended) with a cycle tire.
 

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ILBTS
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I avoided this "breaking in the rain with the darkside" dilema by simply keeping the tire designed for my bike, on my bike. :)
but I know, being a nay sayer ( I have that right, right?) I should just shut my pie-hole and move on to another thread.
 

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You're thinking of braking torque...not tire friction (traction). If you have better brakes, then yes, its easier to lock up the wheel. But if you have increased tire traction (with no changes to the braking system), its much harder to lock up the wheels (think ice vs dry pavement).
Nope...if you look, I'm talking only of tire traction. You've now added in another variable with tire weight. And yes, a heavier tire will require more braking torque to slow the wheel/tire combo.
Yes, and of course on dry ground you're exactly right, the tire will be more difficult to lockup... on wet ground..,. fuhgeddaboutit!
What I said applies regardless of road condition. A tire with more traction will ALWAYS be harder to lock up than a tire with less traction.

Motorcycle tyres are stickier (known fact)

I thought about going dark side because o was tired of getting 9000 miles from a cycle tire but after talking to my Continental rep (i am in the tire business) I decided to stick (no pun intended) with a cycle tire.
As I said, I don't run darkside...so I was going off darksiders' claims of increased straight line traction. If the car tire has less traction than a MC tire, then it fully explains why he's locking up the rear more frequently in the rain.
 
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