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Discussion Starter #1
It's been almost a week since I've tinkered with the ole' Bayou and I'm starting to wonder if I should have "dipped" the carb. before reassembling it. It ran ok, but not perfectly. As I said in another post--the idle "fluttered" from approx. 900-1100 rpm. It never stayed the same speed. It also seemed to run a lot better when I shut off the fuel to drain the bowl before putting it away. Does that mean that I'm running too rich? (I haven't had a chance to run it enough to check the plug. I live in a neighborhood that doesn't allow 4-wheelers.)

I need to loosen it from the intake-side anyway to adjust it and, since it isn't that difficult to take apart, I'm wondering if I should disassemble it again, dip it and blow it out instead of using Carb. Cleaner in all of the orifices like I did before. (I didn't let the Carb. Cleaner touch anything plastic/rubber...in case you care.) With that said--what do you use to "dip" the carb. in? I thought I read Acetone...is this correct? I have a Parts Washer with solvent in it--should I let it soak in some solvent overnight, blow it out with air and reassemble or will this not do the trick?

While I have it apart this time, I'm going to replace all of the parts. Where is a reputable place to order a rebuild kit from? I can do most things but I've never replaced the float/needle/seat assembly--is this difficult to do? And, last, what type of Air Filter should I put on this (K & N?) and where should I order this from?

Thanks,

Otis
 

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Not knowing which model Bayou it is difficult to determine what may be the problem.

If you have one with diaphragms for the main jet needle and the idle air cut, then you need to pay careful attention to the condition of the diaphragms and the small O-rings that seal the vacuum passages. I have seen countless carbs that have been "cleaned" and end up with missing parts, cracked diaphragms because the owner turned it upside down and squirted it with carb cleaner and ate the diaphragm, jets missing, and needles reassembled with the spacers on the wrong side of the locks. Other times it is simply a matter of a float that no longer floats, or a defective carb body with an eroded float valve seat that no longer seals on the OEM Kawasaki carbs, leaky or misadjusted starting valve (choke), and even misadjusted pilot screws. Or, worse yet, nothing wrong with the carburetor but the CDI or coil was failing and were not checked during the diagnosis.

I am not a fan of dipping a carburetor. When that is done it has to be completely disassembled and each and every "rubber" part has to be removed and kept away from the cleaning chemical or you will be buying enough replacement parts to simply buy a new carb.

Carburetor cleaning chemicals are not acetone. Although, if you have serious gum problems from old fuel either acetone or denatured alcohol will usually remove them with a little work. The commercial carb dipping chemicals are a mix of products known to create brain cancer, and require the use of nitrile gloves and ventilation to the point that you cannot even smell the chemicals.

Blowing a carburetor out with more than three to five pounds of air pressure can blow passage blocks out and ruin the carb body. The spray can cleaners have limited pressure and do not blow out the blocks.

I have said this before and brought on protests, but I use sheep dip and water to soak carburetors that are gummed beyond the use of a good non-foaming spray cleaner. It is relatively safe, eats all the organic crud, but difficult to obtain outside of livestock supply houses. Again, it is necessary to keep the chemical off your skin as it also removes skin and can pass through the skin and create adverse health reactions.

For average carburetor cleaning I use Kawasaki or Honda's spray products that do not foam. I also have a selection of fine brass wires that I can carefully probe the passages and make sure there is no crud left without damaging the soft carburetor body.

As far as rebuild kits, I do not believe anyone sells a complete kit anymore. Your best bet is to identify the parts you need, look them up on the parts diagrams and lists, and go from there.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Sorry I forgot to mention the model--it's a 1997 Bayou 220 with the stock Mikuni Carb. I tinkered with it a little more today and I tried what someone else had suggested--moving the c-clip on the needle down to the "middle" slot and setting the mixture screw 2-turns out. This made it run worse, actually...as if it was way too rich. I then moved it back the the 1st slot--the original location from the factory, I believe--and I set the mixture screw to 1.5 turns out (also the factory setting) and it seemed to run better. (I realize that these settings vary due to temp., altitude, etc.--I'm in Virginia and I'm not in the mountains.) The idle speed still varies, though, but that doesn't really bother me as long as it runs ok.

From the parts diagrams and from taking it apart, I don't believe I blew anything out or lost any parts. I didn't use compressed air--just a can of Carb. Cleaner and some very fine metal polish to remove the crust from the brass parts. Other than some white scaly-stuff in the bowl--which doesn't wipe or scrape off--it is really clean inside.

It's funny that you mention the choke--this carb doesn't have one. There is a cable and there was a rubber plug clogging the hole the plunger goes in. I lost the plug, actually, so I made one out of a rubber schraeder valve and a pencil. (I didn't have a lot of stuff at my disposal...so I did it "McGuyver-style".) As far as I can tell, this isn't leaking though I don't know the ramifications of not having the real thing in place. When/if I order a rebuild kit (or the parts for one), I'll also order a new plunger assembly.

The only other question I have for you is about the air filter. The K & N filter that fits this is like $50. I'm fine with that but this quad doesn't have the cover for the air box or the proper bolts to hold it in place... So, do they make a filter that fits directly on the carb without the air box? I don't plan to run this thing in water--so, what other issues do you foresee if I do away with the air box altogether?

I'm new to these things and the main purpose for buying this is to push a sprint car and get around the pits at the races. I only paid $500 for it and other than the few issues I've discussed, it appears to be in good condition. No rust, no frame damage/bent parts, etc.

Thanks for your help...

Otis
 

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i have a question when you put the needle back in (the one with the c clip)
did you put the needle in first through the slide then the plastic thing that holds the spring then the spring.iv seen people put the needle through the spring holder first then put it in the slide.that would cause some issues.

as for the k/n filter yes they make a filter that goes right to the carb and eliminate the air box.but you wil have to change jets to comp for more air flow.you will run way more leaner with a k/n filter than with a normal filter.
bikebandit.com sells aftermarket filters like k/n but they have a different name.

also while im thinkin about it how did the nedle look(the one with the c clip)
was it scratched up,bent .and was the tip of that needle beveled still.
i had a mikui give me fits and it was due to a sractched up tip of the needle.
and was aslo the wrong sized needle for that machine.

hope this may help out a bit -corey=-)
 

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K&N K&N Round High-Flow Replacement Filters

K&N’s high flow replacement air filters are designed to increase horsepower and acceleration while providing excellent filtration. K&N replacement air filters are washable and reusable and come a 10... details

Usually ships within 24 hours
Overall Rating 4.8 out of 5
This product fits 1997 Kawasaki Bayou 220:
Air Filter
Air Filter > Left
$51.95
to
$53.95
heres the price etc for the k/n filter from bikebandit .com
 

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Discussion Starter #6
If I understand correctly... I put the little plastic washer, then needle with c-clip, then the "seat spring", as it's called on Bike Bandit. It's the weird-shaped thing that goes in to hold pressure on the c-clip by the spring. Then, I put the spring itself, the rubber gasket and then the cap screws on. I think it's right. The other way, there would be nothing holding pressure on the needle.

The needle looked good. There was a little bit of crud on it when I first took it apart--it was like a little ring of stuff from where it had been sitting forever. Once I was finished, the needle looked brand new. No scratches or bends... As for the bevel, the bottom is beveled but I don't have one to compare it to.

So, for the K & N Filter that fits on the carb. AND/OR the K & N Filter that fits inside the air box--I will need to rejet/richen the carb to compensate for the increased flow? What jet would I need and where do I buy main jets (I assume?) from?

Should I just buy a replacement filter for it? Right now, there is nothing but the air box, the cylindrical-looking filter--without a filter. It's just a black mesh held on by rubber bands. (You can think the guy that tried to fix it before me for that.)

Thanks for your help!

OC
 

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id go with the k/n air filter .

as for the jet you want to step it up by one size bigger.but i thought about it last nite and you have the adjustable needle.you can fatten it up by movein the clip and playin with the air adjust screw.so if u like k/n filters you can fatten it up with out the jet and itl be all good.

-corey-
 
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