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so I put the dyna 2000 in my 82 KZ1100B2 a couple days ago. It start and runs fine. Although I did find this on APE's site and it also mentions it in the dyna manual

"For those of you who plan to purchase the new Dyna-2000 ignition for a GPZ 1100 motor (1981-85), you must use the ignition housing with seal from a KZ1000J motor."

I did not do this, and it does not make much sense to me. once the old pickup plate and advancer is out of there, there is nothing really to replace, you are left with 2 engine case halfs, a seal and the end of the crank. Unless they are talking about the ign cover?
 

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I found this:



EFI Signal On A 1982 GPZ1100 B2

Does anyone know how the fuel injection on a 1982 Gpz1100 gets it signal to inject fuel? I was trying to connect a Dyna tech 2000 ignition and the bike won’t start. My current thinking is that the stock rotor sends a signal to the ECU telling it to inject fuel, and since it’s out of the circuit when using the Dyna 2000, the signal never gets sent, no fuel is injected and the bike won’t start. If this is so, is there a work-around or is this ignition only for carbureted bikes and not for bikes with EFI?

steell

Re:EFI signal on a 1982 Gpz1100
IIRC, it gets a signal from the igniter.

Best idea would probably be to find someone that's done it and see what they used to trigger the computer.

If it was me, I'd replace the stock computer with a MegaSquirt EFI controller and use it to control the ignition also. Problem is, the MicroSquirt version sells for $400.

I believe I saw where someone on the MegaSquirt board has already done an 82 GPz1100, but I'm not sure.

howard95132

Re:EFI signal on a 1982 Gpz1100
Thanks. This confirms my suspicion. I'm in contact with Raymond of Dynatech to look into it. So far, I haven't found anyone who's done it on an '82 GPz, but Raymond says that he did it on an '83 which also has EFI. Hopefully, I get an answer and a fix, and of course I just removed it last night intending to send it back!

howard95132

Re:EFI signal on a 1982 Gpz1100
Now that I know what I’m looking for, my bike maintenance manual shows a 3p (3-wire) connector from the IC igniter that has a black, green and red wire. The red wire goes to the main/fuel pump relay. The green and black wires go to the main control unit relaying the engine speed. Since this is removed when using the Dyna 2000, the fuel pump relay doesn’t get a signal to pump fuel and the ECU has no idea that the engine (speed) is running. Ughh!!! I knew this ignition wasn’t designed for my bike. I was certain that I wired it correctly and while my first suspicion was that the engine was receiving a spark at the wrong time, my second was that the IC igniter sent signals vital to the engine running and that its removal was causing my bike not to start. I don’t see a solution, but I’m interested in suggestions as Raymond at Dynatech says that he installed it on a 1983 Gpz.

howard95132

Re:EFI signal on a 1982 Gpz1100 10 Months, 4 Weeks ago
I figured out how to get it to work. If the main/pump signal is tied high (12V) via the same switched +12V signal to the ignition coil primary, this will enable the fuel pump relay. The green & black wires go from the ‘trigger (other) end’ of the ignition primary to the ECU. If these signals (white & blue in the Dyna circuit) are fed back to the ECU, it will now know the engine speed. I'll know for certain when I wire it up tomorrow, but from examining the wiring diagram in my service manual, this would do it. All of these signals can be fed from the ignition coils via the disconnected IC igniter connector that connects back to the fuel pump relay (red) and ECU (black & green) with three wires and female spade connectors.


howard95132

Re:EFI signal on a 1982 Gpz1100
Turns out, I was right all along. This whole time I couldn’t understand how the bike ‘knew’ where to fire on startup. It fired at 40 degrees as I said and I know that an engine can’t start at 40 deg. The two primary wires fed back to the ECU send a signal where the rotor is at startup, and the bike starts. It also turns out that the fuel pump was not the issue. If I wire the fuel pump relay it stays on, which is incorrect, so I removed that connection. The only ‘problem’ now is that the tach doesn’t work, but I believe I have the answer to that also. I disconnected the drive circuitry of the tack and wired the 2000 directly to the meter. This is incorrect. I believe I need to wire the tach as it was, and then feed the 2000 green wire to the same tach connection where the IC igniter was.
steell

Re:EFI signal on a 1982 Gpz1100
It's good to hear that you have it figured out!

If you could make up a schematic or wiring diagram and post it here, it might help the next guy trying to do the same thing.

Howard95132
Actually the yellow wire is the correct connection. Everything finally works properly.


1982 Kawasaki GPZ1100 B2 ECU Pin out

I have a 82 GPZ1100 B2 also . I got out my well used service manual and copied the wire pin-out if you are going to use the EFI system.

The connector is numbered left to right with pin #1 on the lower row of pins
with #12 above #1 .

I'll give you the pin-out and wire colors that are viewed from the wire side.

#1 Black/Yellow Ground
#2 Blank
#3 Blank
#4 White/Red Battery +
#5 Blue/Red Sensor Ground
#6 Blue Air Temperature Sensor +
#7 Blue/Yellow Control Unit +
#8 Green Engine Speed
#9 Blank
#10 Gray Engine Temperature +
#11 Blue/White Throttle Opening Angle
#12 Yellow Injector Drive Signal
#13 Blank
#14 Blank
#15 Blank
#16 Black/Green Control Unit Ground
#17 Blue/Orange Throttle Sensor +
#18 Black Engine Speed
#19 Red/Black Starter Signal
#20 Blank
#21 Green/White Fuel Pump Relay Drive Signal
 

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I finally got it running by connecting the white dyna wire(coil 1&4) to the back cable in the now redundant plug for the ignitor, and the blue (coil 2&3) wire to the green wire by linking from the coil connections. At least now the computer knows the motor is trying to run, The tach also seems to work ok without trying it directly to the dyna systems as I believe from the wiring diagram that the black wire also feeds the tach.

I may have another issue with the fuel pump/pressure/relay, not sure which, any ideas?

Thanks for the help so far.
 

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The fuel pump runs off the commands given by the fuel pump relay(behind the left side cover below the seat). There are two(2) connectors, a Black and a White one. One or more may have corrosion on the electrical pins.

The relay has no pressure indicators, and runs on time commands given by the FI computer in the tail of the bike. On these bikes, if the return valve(as you sit on the seat, it's on the right side of the tank with a line going from the fuel pressure regulator) gets clogged, it will run rich with black sparkplugs.
 

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We've had at least one customer install the Dyna 2000 on a GPZ 1100 with fuel injection.

I don't know all the things he did - but here are a few snippets:

DO NOT install the Dyna 2000 module next to the Kawasaki EFI unit. There is interference caused by the EFI unit that confuses the Dyna 2000.

Make sure you use suppression wires. BUT NEVER double up and use suppression wires with suppression plug caps - this creates too much resistance and major problems occur.

Here's some email info from this customer - start at the bottom and work back (this may be the same person referenced in Mikes Post):

PS - All of these signals can be fed from the ignition coils via the disconnected IC igniter connector that connects back to the fuel pump relay (red) and ECU (black & green) with three wires and female spade connectors. And this will/should work.

Howard
-------------------------

I may actually know how to get it to work. It seems to me that if the main/pump signal is tied high (12V) via the same switched +12V signal to the ignition coil primary, this will enable the fuel pump relay. The green & black wires go from the ‘trigger (other) end’ of the ignition primary to the ECU. If these signals (white & blue in the Dyna circuit) are fed back to the ECU, it will now know the engine speed. Any comments? This appears to be the solution.

Regards,

Howard

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Now that I know what I’m looking for, my bike maintenance manual shows a 3p (3-wire) connector from the IC igniter that has a black, green and red wire. The red wire goes to the main/fuel pump relay. The green and black wires go to the main control unit relaying the engine speed. Since this is removed when using the Dyna 2000, the fuel pump relay doesn’t get a signal to pump fuel and the ECU has no idea that the engine (speed) is running. Ughh!!!
 

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Hi all

I think I sorted the wiring for the dyna 2000 ok, I replaced the fuel pump and when the bike fired up it would die out after a couple on minutes so I checks the return valve and found it stuck closed. I cleaned it and got it working but have a new symptom. It rides ok for about 3 miles but then will not take any throttle. I can start it but it is undriveable, not taking any throttle unless I let it cool off for a while, then it goes 3 miles and won't take throttle again. I am running out of ideas and patience. Any suggestion appreciated.
Thank you
 

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A couple of items:

Cleaning Kawasaki TPS

I'd suggest cleaning the Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) too as it's a carbon variable resistor that gets dirty. It's the module with DFI on it below the tank on the right side.

To clean it, first go to Radio Shack or any other electronic supply store and purchase some De-Oxit contact cleaner/preservative.
With the engine off, remove a small SS clip holding the wiring to the TPS and disconnect the cable.Put some newspapers to keep the cleaner off the engine cases. caig.com - Home of DeoxIT is their website.

Spray the De-Oxit up inside the TPS while opening and closing the throttle several times to flush out any carbon residue. Let it dry for a while, then reassemble the TPS cable and retaining clip.

You should notice an improvement in throttle responce.




Kawasaki Fuel Injection Sensor Specs

Here's from my 1982 GPz1100 B2 factory shop manual:

Air temperature sensor spec(probably the one on the air filter housing, or next to it).

Meter at ohms X 1K ohms ( I use ohms X 2K as it works on my meter)
Disconnect the wiring from the harness, one meter probe to one of the connector pins, the other on the last pin.

Should read 2.0K ohms to 3.0 K ohms at 68 F, if your meter won't read this, try the 20K ohm setting.

A footnote says this reading is true when sensor temperature is 20C (68F), 4.7 K ohms to 7.6 K ohms when 0 C (32 F) and 1.4 K ohms to 2.2 K ohms when 30 C (86 F).

Engine temperature sensor spec:
Again, meter to 2K ohm settings, one meter lead to the push on terminal (remove the wire as it may give a false reading) and the other to a chassis ground(any Black with Yellow stripe wire is part of the ground circuit).

The readings will be the same as the air temperature sensor.

The TPS has an electrical connector, only the first three(3) contacts are used, counting from left to right as you face it.

From my factory shop manual I'm making it easier to get the readings, by using shortcuts).

1. Ignition switch off.

2. Remove the small SS clip holding the cable to the TPS.

3. Using a multimeter set on ohms, range of 2K.

4. Measure between the first electrical contact on the left and the third to the right.

5. It should read between 3.3K ohms to 6.8K ohms.

The next test will cover the range between idle and full throttle:

1. Set the meter's probes on the left contact and the one next to it, as this is the idle position check.

2. Readings should be between 2.1K ohms to 4.2 K ohms

Full throttle check:

1. Same electrical contacts used.

2. With the throttle wide open, readings should be between 0.35 K ohms to 0.71 K ohms, see if the resistance changes smoothly, with no fluctuations or wide variations as the throttle is closed down to the idle position.

3. If there are variations, try cleaning the TPS with the De-Oxit electrical contact cleaner/preservative. Open and close it with the throttle while spraying the cleaner up inside.

4. caig.com - Home of DeoxIT is the website for the electrical contact cleaner/preservative. It can be purchased at Radio Shack Stores and other electronic supply places.

Check the wiring going to the TPS as there have been failures due to metal fatigue in the wiring from flexing.
 

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Thanks mike, I have checked all of the items suggested, everything looks good. Can you think of any reason why the fuel pump might constantly run when the engine is running but behave as it should at all other times, that would appear to be what is happening.
 

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I believe the pump is keeping the fuel rail pressurized to 33 PSI at idle, and when the TPS senses throttle movement, it goes to 35 PSI to supply the engine. So it won't run and stop like it does when you initially turn the key on.
 
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