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Hello, I have zr750c zephyr 7000 miles from new, my problem is my hand starts to get uncomfortable after about half an hours riding I think arthritis or something is starting to develop. I would like to make the clutch easier to operate. I have a new cable routed correctly and lubricated but I'm still struggling a bit. I wondered if a slightly longer clutch arm onto the pivot coming out if the clutch cover would help as it would provide more leverage. I know the cable mount would be wrong but I think I could sort that by making a plate fit onto the original mounting position. Has anyone tried similar and if so does anyone know of an arm that would fit the splined shaft and is a bit longer ? Does anyone know of lighter clutch springs that would fit from another bike ?
Any advice greatfully received.
Thanks
Andrew
 

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I thought The Zephyr 750, at least the one I own, have about the softest springs it could have....and my hands are small, and am not exactly young

This is unusual because most are looking for stronger springs to 'improve performance'. Going to weaker springs, I'd think Zephyr 550, or 400. Not sure what the rating are, but part number iaredifferent....and you can check than on any on-line supplier microfiches. About any spring would fit, and of course, smaller bikes are SUPPOSSED to have softer springs, because engine have lower torque. Of course, this could make the clutch slip at high rates of acceleration, thus is not recommended.

The springs for the ZR-7 in North America, with about same clutch, are longer, but slightly smaller in overall diameter, and the wire is small diameter also. I know because have a set, but never tried. I wouldn't expect them to be weaker, but perhaps a different feel. The lever at the clutch housing, also have a different number, but don't know if it would be longer. I know the cable for the faired version of the ZR-7 are slightly longer but same otherwise.

No offense, but I'll play Doctor here, w/out being one. All this could be a not very good mechanical band-aid for physical problems. If you are developing arthritis, it may be time to start thinking the unthinkable: a bike with an automatic transmission. Some enthusiast motorcycle writers who own one, say they are surprisingly satisfying, enjoying more the ride, instead of worrying what gear you are in, or clutch action.

.....apparently some find this very enjoyable on the scooters, and the largest ones with 650 engines, are essentially very, very well behaved motorcycles. They will do touring also.
 

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An automatic transmission would solve the problem. I have test ridden the Honda Africa Twin with DCT (automatic).
I thought I would hate it, but was pleasantly surprised. In my opinion, automatics are a viable option.

The other option as alluded to by Hugojose, is to switch to a smaller ride and get the benefit of not only a lighter clutch pull, but the benefits of a lighter weight, more nimble bike. As I get older, I am eyeing smaller bikes that don't have to wrestled out of my garage, or tight parking spots. It also eliminated the fear of dropping my heavy ride and not being able to pick it up. I sat on a Versys 300X and was able to pull in the clutch with just one finger. It is incredibly light.

While a longer clutch lever will give you more mechanical advantage, it will also be further away from the handlebar and might actually be harder to use since you will have to stretch your fingers out further, where your fingers lose their mechanical advantage.
 

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I thought The Zephyr 750, at least the one I own, have about the softest springs it could have....and my hands are small, and am not exactly young

This is unusual because most are looking for stronger springs to 'improve performance'. Going to weaker springs, I'd think Zephyr 550, or 400. Not sure what the rating are, but part number iaredifferent....and you can check than on any on-line supplier microfiches. About any spring would fit, and of course, smaller bikes are SUPPOSSED to have softer springs, because engine have lower torque. Of course, this could make the clutch slip at high rates of acceleration, thus is not recommended.

The springs for the ZR-7 in North America, with about same clutch, are longer, but slightly smaller in overall diameter, and the wire is small diameter also. I know because have a set, but never tried. I wouldn't expect them to be weaker, but perhaps a different feel. The lever at the clutch housing, also have a different number, but don't know if it would be longer. I know the cable for the faired version of the ZR-7 are slightly longer but same otherwise.

No offense, but I'll play Doctor here, w/out being one. All this could be a not very good mechanical band-aid for physical problems. If you are developing arthritis, it may be time to start thinking the unthinkable: a bike with an automatic transmission. Some enthusiast motorcycle writers who own one, say they are surprisingly satisfying, enjoying more the ride, instead of worrying what gear you are in, or clutch action.

.....apparently some find this very enjoyable on the scooters, and the largest ones with 650 engines, are essentially very, very well behaved motorcycles. They will do touring also.
I thought The Zephyr 750, at least the one I own, have about the softest springs it could have....and my hands are small, and am not exactly young

This is unusual because most are looking for stronger springs to 'improve performance'. Going to weaker springs, I'd think Zephyr 550, or 400. Not sure what the rating are, but part number iaredifferent....and you can check than on any on-line supplier microfiches. About any spring would fit, and of course, smaller bikes are SUPPOSSED to have softer springs, because engine have lower torque. Of course, this could make the clutch slip at high rates of acceleration, thus is not recommended.

The springs for the ZR-7 in North America, with about same clutch, are longer, but slightly smaller in overall diameter, and the wire is small diameter also. I know because have a set, but never tried. I wouldn't expect them to be weaker, but perhaps a different feel. The lever at the clutch housing, also have a different number, but don't know if it would be longer. I know the cable for the faired version of the ZR-7 are slightly longer but same otherwise.

No offense, but I'll play Doctor here, w/out being one. All this could be a not very good mechanical band-aid for physical problems. If you are developing arthritis, it may be time to start thinking the unthinkable: a bike with an automatic transmission. Some enthusiast motorcycle writers who own one, say they are surprisingly satisfying, enjoying more the ride, instead of worrying what gear you are in, or clutch action.

.....apparently some find this very enjoyable on the scooters, and the largest ones with 650 engines, are essentially very, very well behaved motorcycles. They will do touring also.
Thank you for taking the time to reply, I am going to get some new springs just on the off chance that the previous owner fitted heavy duty ones, bike has had a few nice bits fitted by previous owner by the look of it so I may be lucky.
 

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An automatic transmission would solve the problem. I have test ridden the Honda Africa Twin with DCT (automatic).
I thought I would hate it, but was pleasantly surprised. In my opinion, automatics are a viable option.

The other option as alluded to by Hugojose, is to switch to a smaller ride and get the benefit of not only a lighter clutch pull, but the benefits of a lighter weight, more nimble bike. As I get older, I am eyeing smaller bikes that don't have to wrestled out of my garage, or tight parking spots. It also eliminated the fear of dropping my heavy ride and not being able to pick it up. I sat on a Versys 300X and was able to pull in the clutch with just one finger. It is incredibly light.

While a longer clutch lever will give you more mechanical advantage, it will also be further away from the handlebar and might actually be harder to use since you will have to stretch your fingers out further, where your fingers lose their mechanical advantage.
Thanks for taking the time to reply, I was thinking more along the lines of a longer arm the one with the splines at the engine clutch cover end, I know Harley Davidson did similar to ease operation in the past.
 

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The longer arm at the clutch cover will still mean longer travel is needed at the handlebar. I am not saying this won't work, but you need to keep this in mind. Changing the clutch springs may also work but you have to wonder why the PO installed stiffer springs in the first place. If you get it solved, please post back here for the benefit of others.
 

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The longer arm at the clutch cover will still mean longer travel is needed at the handlebar. I am not saying this won't work, but you need to keep this in mind. Changing the clutch springs may also work but you have to wonder why the PO installed stiffer springs in the first place. If you get it solved, please post back here for the benefit of others.
Will do thanks
 
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