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2x the bike for 1/2 the $
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1,175 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I dont know if anyone else has experienced this..

While removing my exhaust to install new baffles, as I unscrewed the forwardmost exhaust flange nut it became evident that the nut was ceased on the end of the bolt. Rather than just the acorn nut coming off, the nut AND threaded bolt unscrewed from the engine in one piece. After installing the baffles I was able to reinstall the exhaust, just screwing the nut/bolt in it in as if it was a regular 'headed' bolt, but does anyone know of a way to separate the nut from the bolt for future reference? Or should I just plan on buying a new threaded bolt and nut? ..I'm assuming that, other than being very careful not to cross thread into the engine during reinstallation, there is nothing inherently wrong with continuing to use the ceased nut/bolt. (please correct me if I'm wrong..)

Also, if replaced, how the heck do you initially screw the 'headless' bolt into the bolt-hole of the engine?
 

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Registered
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15,327 Posts
Wish I could help. Hopefully it's not as much of a pain as it sounds. That sucks, man.
 

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Custom '07 1500 Classic
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1,737 Posts
Put two nuts on the bolt and tighten them together, then use them to un-screw the acorn from the bolt.... some penetrating oil may help too...
 

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Ride it! 100% Poser
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234 Posts
Why bother with it? Your stud/nut has just become a bolt...Don't worry about it.
 

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Nobody Home
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1,768 Posts
does anyone know of a way to separate the nut from the bolt for future reference? Or should I just plan on buying a new threaded bolt and nut? ..I'm assuming that, other than being very careful not to cross thread into the engine during reinstallation, there is nothing inherently wrong with continuing to use the ceased nut/bolt. (please correct me if I'm wrong..)

Also, if replaced, how the heck do you initially screw the 'headless' bolt into the bolt-hole of the engine?
You have a threaded stud that goes into the head. The idea is for it to have full thread engagement in the head (aluminum) for max strength. To separate the nut and stud when they come out together, grab the stud with a pair of vise grips just below the nut and use a wrench on the nut. To install studs you "double nut" them. Put two nuts on the stud tightened against each other and screw it in. Then separate and remove the nuts. Coat the stud threads with anti-seize (like Fel-Pro C5-A) and you won't have this problem next time.

I'd replace the stud/nut if it's damaged. If you end up damaging threads you want them to NOT be the ones in the head.
 

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Custom '07 1500 Classic
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1,737 Posts
You're the guy who ends up having me install heli-coils in their screwed up head threads.

Bingo!!! We see it all the time.... But my favorite is the guy that breaks of the bolt in the head and tries to drill it out, but doesn't get the drill straight, opps... Then they bring it to the shop thinking that we can "fix" it... $$$$$
 

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2x the bike for 1/2 the $
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1,175 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Ah, that makes total sense! I would never have thought of the 'double nut' method. I'm not mechanically inclined. LoL! Well, not to say I can't do mechanical stuff, as I installed a new suspension and brakes on my car and have done all my own work on my bikes, but that is because I had the instructions telling me how to do it. Without instructions, I always worry I'll eff something up and cost myself more money to fix it.

I definitely would like to correct the issue next time I have to remove the exhaust because, as BillyBobby eluded to, damaging the threads inside the head itself would not be good.. so better to avoid that.
 

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2x the bike for 1/2 the $
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1,175 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Bad idea. There are good reasons they use studs. But you can replace the acorn nuts with standard nuts.
I think that is what I might do. Doesn't look as nice as the acorn, but I think the reason it got lodged on the bolt like it did is that the flange on my V&H pipes sit lower toward the head than the stock exhaust flanges did leaving more bolt than the nut could handle. I guess my other option would be to thow a couple washers on between the flange and nut if I want to keep it 'pretty' with acorns..
 

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Custom '07 1500 Classic
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1,737 Posts
Many aftermarket exhausts do have thinner flanges than OEM and require a washer under the acorn, hell there should be one there anyway...
 

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Novice Tank Roller
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15,810 Posts
Get a new bolt and nut to put in the head. Mine came apart that way too. At one point, I bot it cross-threaded in the head and had to have the head removed so they could get the cross threaded bolt out and re-thread the hole. Not a fun situation.
 

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Registered
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1,295 Posts
All 4 of mine was like this. I was able to get 3 of the nuts off with heat but the threaded studs were so rusty I just bought new ones.
 

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Registered
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2,344 Posts
Bad idea. There are good reasons they use studs. But you can replace the acorn nuts with standard nuts.
I would go one step better and replace them with serrated flange nuts.
 

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V 2win
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444 Posts
The stud should have allen head on the outside end. Use a allen wrench to tighten the new stud, than use anti cease on the stud before installing the acorn. IMO unless you remove your exhaust alot leave it alone, its fine
 
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