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I took the ERC yesterday with my 1982 KZ1100. Without hesitation I can say that it was the best ten hours that I have spent learning about my motorcycle, my self and my capabilities. I have been riding off and on since about 1963. I would guess that I have logged about 10,000 miles in that time, half of it in France. One of my classmates brought his Gold Wing on which he has logged 114,000 miles. I may have been the novice. There were three cruisers and seven Tupperware covered rockets. No one laid down their bike.

This was a one-day course with your own bike. We spent the first thirty minutes in the classroom getting our license, registration and insurance checked and signing waivers. The next thirty minutes were spent performing the T-CLOCS inspection. No one failed the T-CLOCS inspection, which is rare. This group schedules standbys in case there are no-shows, people that are late or their bike fails the inspection. The next eight hours were spent on the “Range” performing the various exercises.

We learned how to counterbalance our bikes by body weight shift in very tight low speed turns. We discovered and practiced what it really means to “look where you want to go.” How to successfully stop in a turn. Where do most motorcycle-only crashes occur? We learned and practiced avoidance maneuvers. We practiced the proper way to enter a curve and power your way through. We practiced over and over again stopping in an emergency situation. We also practiced approaching the instructor at about 20 MPH not knowing whether he was going to tell us to stop, swerve left or right until the last second. SEE = Search, evaluate, execute. During all of these exercises the instructors provided instant feedback both positive and negative. Unquestionably they knew their subject from start to finish and were masters at imparting their knowledge.

At the conclusion of the range part of the instruction we took a proficiency test to demonstrate that we could execute the skills we had been taught. We then returned to the classroom for about an hour to discuss the effects of alcohol and riding a motorcycle after which we took a written test on all subjects covered. The Experienced Rider Course cards and patches were passed out and we were finished after a jammed packed ten hours.

You cannot learn these skills by reading a book. There is no way you can acquire these skills on your own. Listening to the instructor for a very brief description of the task. Watching the demonstration by his assistant and practicing the exercise and capitalizing on the instant feedback is the only way you are going to understand these skills and develop the ability to duplicate them. Using your own bike is an absolute plus. I received several comments on how good my old beast looked and how well it ran. Those comments were earned in large part due to everyone on this site. I have learned a lot from reading the posts.

Thanks
 

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Thank's Kawa, for that detailed and informative recap of the course. I will be taking it in the spring. I agree with you totally, that it doesn't matter how long you have been riding, the course is a great way to be a better rider. Glad you did well..

D
 

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Sounds like a lot of fun was had. I took the MSF course 20+ years ago. Went about a decade not riding, thinking about taking it again. Different state, different state of mind, hopefully more mature. ;)
 

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The wife wants to learn to ride so I will be taking the MSF agian this spring. I would like to take that ERC also, I have heard others talk about it and have given it high marks. Sounds like you had a good time and learned some new skills.
 
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