Kawasaki Motorcycle Forums banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
649 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So I will be adding the wife to the back of my 900 Custom for the first time next week. Any basic advice? Hardest part is getting her on and off...right? LOL. We are going to practice as much as possible before renting a Dyna Glide down in Arizona for a little tour here in a couple weeks. Wish there were more Kawi rental places so I could get a 1600 or V2K. :lol:
 

·
Riding daily
Joined
·
4,688 Posts
So I will be adding the wife to the back of my 900 Custom for the first time next week. Any basic advice? Hardest part is getting her on and off...right? LOL. We are going to practice as much as possible before renting a Dyna Glide down in Arizona for a little tour here in a couple weeks. Wish there were more Kawi rental places so I could get a 1600 or V2K. :lol:
I quess it would all depend on the family genes.;) If she is a larger lady then a little practice might be necesary but if she is small lady than its not a big deal. Just let her know that she needs to lean with you. Just remember when you first started riding and you didnt know how hard to lean etc. Youll do just fine. Have fun!
 

·
nu2kawi
Joined
·
2,707 Posts
At least by the time you're done doing the 2-up, you'll be ready for the 1600 or v2k
 

·
900 LT
Joined
·
1,135 Posts
a few pointers i can share after 25 or so years of riding,

1. if shes a new rider explain shes the boss, we stop when you say stop, we pull over when you say pull over, we rest when you say we rest.

2. She should not fight the lean of the bike, explain you cant control the lean angle, the degree of the turn and your speed dictates that, leaning against the turn will only cause the bike to lean into the turn further.

3. Smooth shifts, radical shifting will only cause the front of her helmet to contact the back of helmet, with a little practice you can shift so smoooth your passanger will think your bike is an automatic transmission.

4. You must mount the bike first, brace yourself then have her place her left foot on the left peg, step up swing her right leg over find the right peg with her foot and sit down, i like to have my passangers mount from the left side as it reduces the chances of comming in contact with a hot pipe.

5. If you have a backrest try to get her comfortable using it as this will help her lean with the bike, if not have her scoot up to the front of the rear pad and hold your waist.

6. You must master and be comfortable with countersteering, first of all this should be the only way you ever steer your bike 1up or 2up. By using countersteering no matter what she does back there you will be able to make that bike lean and turn, and a slight tweak of the bar back and the bike will stand back straight up and go straight again.

7. explain to her that her feet are to remain on the pegs from the time she mounts the bike till the time she gets off.

I know this comment will draw some different views but here goes, I'm a firm believer if your going to go 2up you put the rear tire at max sidewall pressure and preserve the specified pressure split from front to rear.

example lets say the tire pressure spec is 32 rear and 28 front thats a 4lb split. lets also say the rear sidewall max pressure is 36 psi, when riding 2 up i would set the rear at 36 and the front at 32

Lastly riding 2up is by no means the time to show off, keep it to a nice low key cruise and she will take many more rides with you.

sorry about any spelling errors, im on my way out and dont have time to spell check or proof read :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
649 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
a few pointers i can share after 25 or so years of riding,

1. if shes a new rider explain shes the boss, we stop when you say stop, we pull over when you say pull over, we rest when you say we rest.

2. She should not fight the lean of the bike, explain you cant control the lean angle, the degree of the turn and your speed dictates that, leaning against the turn will only cause the bike to lean into the turn further.

3. Smooth shifts, radical shifting will only cause the front of her helmet to contact the back of helmet, with a little practice you can shift so smoooth your passanger will think your bike is an automatic transmission.

4. You must mount the bike first, brace yourself then have her place her left foot on the left peg, step up swing her right leg over find the right peg with her foot and sit down, i like to have my passangers mount from the left side as it reduces the chances of comming in contact with a hot pipe.

5. If you have a backrest try to get her comfortable using it as this will help her lean with the bike, if not have her scoot up to the front of the rear pad and hold your waist.

6. You must master and be comfortable with countersteering, first of all this should be the only way you ever steer your bike 1up or 2up. By using countersteering no matter what she does back there you will be able to make that bike lean and turn, and a slight tweak of the bar back and the bike will stand back straight up and go straight again.

7. explain to her that her feet are to remain on the pegs from the time she mounts the bike till the time she gets off.

I know this comment will draw some different views but here goes, I'm a firm believer if your going to go 2up you put the rear tire at max sidewall pressure and preserve the specified pressure split from front to rear.

example lets say the tire pressure spec is 32 rear and 28 front thats a 4lb split. lets also say the rear sidewall max pressure is 36 psi, when riding 2 up i would set the rear at 36 and the front at 32

Lastly riding 2up is by no means the time to show off, keep it to a nice low key cruise and she will take many more rides with you.

sorry about any spelling errors, im on my way out and dont have time to spell check or proof read :)
Thanks Ride4Life...you underscored a lot of things I already assumed. Like countersteering, which I am very proud to say I have absolutely mastered...just need to use it all the time...sometimes I get lazy. ;D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
259 Posts
much easier with a back rest, she should just become part of the bike. Thats what works for me. If she needs to
adjust the way she is sitting she should tell you first.
 

·
Poser Proud®
Joined
·
3,778 Posts
My wife has a bad knee and I always get her on the 900 before me, while on the side stand - get both her feet on the pegs and get comfortable. I then get on, take the bike off the side stand and again let her get comfortable while not moving. It can be a big unpleasent surprise if someone adjusts their seating position without telling you. All the other points posted here are great, but just remind her that if she has to shift her position to let you know first. Depending on how confident you are, you may want to pull over and stop before she does any jumping around back there. ;) Just take it easy when you start out until you get the feel of 2 up then you will be fine.
 

·
MaNaMaNa DoDoDoDoDo
Joined
·
4,767 Posts
1. I always explain to my passengers what I expect before riding.
2. I always tell them NOT to mount dismount until I indicate it's OK. (and make sure they know that they do NOT have to dismount immediately. Wife thought she had to once, her leg had fallen asleep and she tried getting off and we all kinda went over. Hard to hold the bike up with 170#'s leaning)
3. Smooth and easy on take off and braking.
4 Have passenger look over shoulder in direction of turn.
5. Remember, passing will take more time.
6. Make sure your passenger knows signals for "I need to stop", "I need to stop soon", "Get me the heck off this thing, NOW"
7. Always keep feet on pegs no matter what.
8. GEAR - Keep your passenger safe.
9 Oh and, your passenger is more than a ride along. He/she needs to watch out for things, too. Like the time she saw a deer in the bushes and I did not. She pointed it out to me so I was more careful.
10. Passengers should NOT wiggle when going through turns.

Probably lots more things. But this is a good start.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,360 Posts
one thing that i do (as im a passenger only) is always ask before i climb on and off the bike. that way he is ready and braced. plus i agree with the she is in control of stopping etc and just because she don't ask to stop, make frequent stops for her!! even if you have to say its for you she will appreciate it she probably won't ask to stop as often as she needs to as not to slow you down but it gets really tiring just sitting back there. and if you can get some of the chatterbox headsets that will help also :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
294 Posts
All excellent replies to your question. Personally I found that two things are important. #1 Communication between both parties, simple as a pat on the sholder for lets stop, knock on the noggin for ready to go, you know simple sign language that both are dancing to the same music.

#2 This I found out real quick. No squirming or moving around when stopping and starting. Balance is a key point in slow maneuvering and its a PIA when your passenger is ajdjusting herself just when you are coming to a stop or starting out.

My sweetie Pie loves to ride and at times I have to reach back just to see if she didn't fall off. The best rides are those you share with the better half.

Ride Safe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,540 Posts
Wear 1/2-helmets so you can lean back and kiss her while at stop lights! This is why I don't have a FF.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,401 Posts
Not to be rude, or mean but it becomes very hard to kiss someone without a jaw when you get injured wearing a half helmet. I have an acquaintance that learned the hard way, and after years of therapy and reconstructions he can kind of do things the way he used to.

This can of worms has been opened before, and I don't mean to start it again, but it still amazes me that the best and most protective gear is often ignored by people partaking in what is ultimately one of the most dangerous activities we can other then mine detecting with your foot and your hands over your ears.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,401 Posts
One easy thing to start with as well is to leave the bike on the side stand, let your wife get a feel for stepping on the passenger pegs then moving her leg over, this allows stability for you as well since with you straddling and the side stand down gives a good foundation for stability.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,540 Posts
Not to be rude, or mean but it becomes very hard to kiss someone without a jaw when you get injured wearing a half helmet. I have an acquaintance that learned the hard way, and after years of therapy and reconstructions he can kind of do things the way he used to.
Not taken as such, but we choose to engage in the risk of riding a "donor-machine" and that in itself is a high-risk activity according to some.
I guess I just view it as another of the elements of risk that I (and my wife)am willing to accept.
 

·
Gimme more twisties
Joined
·
1,090 Posts
Kissing is a very dangerous activity:wink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
649 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
One easy thing to start with as well is to leave the bike on the side stand, let your wife get a feel for stepping on the passenger pegs then moving her leg over, this allows stability for you as well since with you straddling and the side stand down gives a good foundation for stability.
Ain't no way I would recommend someone getting on the bike while it is on its side stand. Other than that all of these responses are great! :D
 

·
Gimme more twisties
Joined
·
1,090 Posts
Yes,
I remember those days too. No longer so , my friends:frown:
 

·
900 LT
Joined
·
1,135 Posts
Ok maybe i been married to long 23 years...... so can someone please tell me what this word kiss means? :biggrin:
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top