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Novice Tank Roller
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15,810 Posts
geez, but 600 bucks? I could go through 3 standard models for that much. My buddy uses his standard car version on his bike without any problems. As long as he tucks it away in the rain, it doesn't seem to have any performance problems.
 

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Registered
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2,069 Posts
If you look at the specs closely, you'll notice that it uses and INTERNAL speaker, and DOES NOT have Bluetooth technology.
I can't see how you would be able to hear the directions most of the time?
 

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My hat is made of tinfoil
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20,826 Posts
I have NO input on the 220, but can say I LOVE my 550.
Its so awesome I got my wife one for her bike to.
 

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Night Rider
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802 Posts
The motorcycle model gps units are vibration-proof, but my Kawasaki doesn't vibrate like a Harley so I figure my Garmin 765 is safer on that count.

For the record, I am not trying to turn this into a Harley-bashing thread.
 

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2007 900 Classic
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2,517 Posts
I use the Garmin 255W, no bluetooth, I do not need to hear the thing when I can see the map just fine. When I am crusing in town I can hear it just fine.
 

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Premium Member
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820 Posts
I have the Garmin Nuvi 260w, and it works great... I think I picked it up for $149 at Costco last year... and really, as long as points me in the right direction with just a quick glance, which it does, that's all I need, and like idmtchris said, around town, you can hear it fine.

Took it with me to the Grand Canyon last year, and it went through rain, and 100+ temps with no problem. It sits behind the windshield, so no heavy rain got on it while riding. When I stopped, I simply unplugged it, un-velcroed it from the mount, and put it in my pocket. But a sandwich baggy with a rubber band would keep it dry if need be. It's been on the bike many, many times, even after the buzziness of the 900 at speed, it's still works great, and it does double duty in my truck :)
 

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TV Guru
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11,779 Posts
geez, but 600 bucks? I could go through 3 standard models for that much. My buddy uses his standard car version on his bike without any problems. As long as he tucks it away in the rain, it doesn't seem to have any performance problems.
+1000.

I paid a little over $150 for my 780w. If it get's FUBAR'd and I have to replace it, I'm still well ahead.

It has both Bluetooth and a headphone jack, so I'm all set for hearing it.
 

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Registered
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460 Posts
The best would be a motorcycle GPS, but I use a $150.- double duty standard Garmin Nuvi.
I never use the loudspeaker function anyway, not even in the car.
Using it with a 12V socket on the bike.
 

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Love my 1500!
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2,460 Posts
I have the Nuvi 750, cost around $150 and has a built-in MP3 player. I plug it into my amplified speakers so I get both tunes and directions. So far, I'm very happy with it.
 

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Wannabe Poser
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3,446 Posts
I look at a map then just go. I know the road is going to go somewhere. LOL
 

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TV Guru
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11,779 Posts
I look at a map then just go. I know the road is going to go somewhere. LOL
Yeah, but you can cross most New England states in a couple hours (or even less) - meaning, if you're lost, you can just keep going in one direction and eventually you'll hit the border (or a body of water). Then, you're no more than a couple hours from home. Not only that, with the amount of population we have crammed in such small places, we don't have those long stretches of nothing that can result in an empty fuel tank in the middle of nowhere.

Try that in some of those big states out west and you could be half a day or more away from home by the time you hit the state line...or stranded...

Now, in my case, I use one on longer trips because we don't have a decent rural highway system in New England that allows you to go long distances on the same road. To get anywhere, you have to follow a complicated web of back roads or resort to taking the interstates. I use the GPS to keep track of all routes I have to follow to anywhere distant.
 

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TV Guru
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11,779 Posts
I have the Nuvi 750, cost around $150 and has a built-in MP3 player. I plug it into my amplified speakers so I get both tunes and directions. So far, I'm very happy with it.
Mine has an MP3 player, too. I love it. I use it with headphones on the bike, though.
 

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Former Vulcan Lady
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4,225 Posts
If you look at the specs closely, you'll notice that it uses and INTERNAL speaker, and DOES NOT have Bluetooth technology.
I can't see how you would be able to hear the directions most of the time?
You are correct about the specs but the write up says "The affordable, compact zūmo 220 motorcycle navigator mounts neatly, right up on your bars ready to guide your ride with spoken street names sent wirelessly to your Bluetooth®-enabled helmet or headset." I think in the specs if mentions that it doesn't connect to your phone.

Mixed message unless I am missing something on the Garmin page. Also, $599 doesn't seem that affordable since I got my 550 for $645, not much more than the 220.
 

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Premium Member
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1,282 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
You are correct about the specs but the write up says "The affordable, compact zūmo 220 motorcycle navigator mounts neatly, right up on your bars ready to guide your ride with spoken street names sent wirelessly to your Bluetooth®-enabled helmet or headset." I think in the specs if mentions that it doesn't connect to your phone.

Mixed message unless I am missing something on the Garmin page. Also, $599 doesn't seem that affordable since I got my 550 for $645, not much more than the 220.
$599 is the MSRP. The 550 MSRP is $899. At $645 you got about 28% off of the MSRP. If you assume the same percentage off of the 220, your around $430 out the door.
 

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Wannabe Poser
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3,446 Posts
Yeah, but you can cross most New England states in a couple hours (or even less) - meaning, if you're lost, you can just keep going in one direction and eventually you'll hit the border (or a body of water). Then, you're no more than a couple hours from home. Not only that, with the amount of population we have crammed in such small places, we don't have those long stretches of nothing that can result in an empty fuel tank in the middle of nowhere.

Try that in some of those big states out west and you could be half a day or more away from home by the time you hit the state line...or stranded...

Now, in my case, I use one on longer trips because we don't have a decent rural highway system in New England that allows you to go long distances on the same road. To get anywhere, you have to follow a complicated web of back roads or resort to taking the interstates. I use the GPS to keep track of all routes I have to follow to anywhere distant.
Well I've been a trucker for about 40 years and still don't have GPS. Not saying they're not nice to have but maybe acquiring a sense of direction is cheaper. LOL. Not all roads truckers go on are major highways either. As far as the bike I've never got to the point where I couldn't find my way back. Might be out of the way but I make it back. I remember as a kid my dad throwing us in the Studebaker and going for a ride to NoWhere. Signs limited heck even paved roads were missing at times. Always got us home. Was always an adventure. I think we rely too much on Hi Tech today. Ya got some Hi Tech stuff between yer ears. Have to start learning to use it. Read the land.
 

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2007 900 Classic
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2,517 Posts
Well I've been a trucker for about 40 years and still don't have GPS. Not saying they're not nice to have but maybe acquiring a sense of direction is cheaper. LOL. Not all roads truckers go on are major highways either. As far as the bike I've never got to the point where I couldn't find my way back. Might be out of the way but I make it back. I remember as a kid my dad throwing us in the Studebaker and going for a ride to NoWhere. Signs limited heck even paved roads were missing at times. Always got us home. Was always an adventure. I think we rely too much on Hi Tech today. Ya got some Hi Tech stuff between yer ears. Have to start learning to use it. Read the land.
But when i want to know where the closest Starbucks is when I am in the middle of the desert, all I have to do is ask the GPS. This works for gas stations, bars and hospitals we well. I have a great sense of dircection and have crossed the country many times with no map in the car. GPS are nice when you are traveling off the beaten path.
 
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