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How do you restore the gas tank. The gas tank that I have has stuff in the tank and I can get it out. It looks like somebody left the old gas in the tank.
 

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I think you're probably limited to a chemical removal process. I read this some where :

1. dump out all gas/funk from tank
2. 1/2 jar of naval jelly disolved in 2 litre bottle of water
3. fill tank and let sit 24hrs
4. dump naval jelly and rinse w/ fresh water
5. 1/2 cup baking soda disolved in 2 litre bottle of water
6. fill tank and let sit 2 hrs
7. dump baking soda and rince 2x w/ fresh water
8. shake all or as much water from tank as possible
9. use 1/2 can or more wd-40 on tank to help imulsify water so rust wont start again


Naval Jelly is basically phosphoric acid in a gel form and when water is added to it you are basically just bringing the chemical back to a slightly diluted, liquid form. Similar products can be found as bathroom cleaners. For example Lime-Away or CLR should do the trick.

Before going through the chemical process of the rust removal, I would recommend trying to "knock" the heavier debris out of the tank first. A suggestion would be to throw a handfull of pennies into the tank with a little water and shake it around for half the day (or until your arms fall off). Dump the dirty water occasionally and add fresh stuff.

I read this somewhere and saved it for my own personal records. I hope it helps!!

- Dan
 

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Back in traffic
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You can also try muratic acid, it is used for cleaning concrete and they sell it in hardware stores. Becareful when using it because it will burn you if you're not careful. You don't have to let it soak to long, maybe a couple of hours and then rinse real good with water.
 

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Just thinking back on this...This is going to sound REAL stupid but hear me out...

When I was a kid, my dad tried to get me to quit drinking Coke. I used to guzzle 2-4L a day. He took a rusty railway spike and dropped it into a glass of Coke. It sat on the counter for a few days but when he took it out - the rust was gone. I'm not recommended it but its something to consider. Fill your tank full of Coke and leave it be for a few days. Ya just never know...

As I grew older, I dropped Coke for Pepsi (a far superior drink). Looking at the ingrediants on the label : Phosophoric Acid is a HUGE ingrediant in Pepsi...Its probably even more concentrated in Coke.

Peace!
 

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There are kits sold to restore tanks. POR-15 is one of them, it comes with a liner thats used to seal minor leaks. Your best bet is to have a radiator shop clean it properly. More expensive option though.
 

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1978KZ650B said:
Just thinking back on this...This is going to sound REAL stupid but hear me out...

When I was a kid, my dad tried to get me to quit drinking Coke. I used to guzzle 2-4L a day. He took a rusty railway spike and dropped it into a glass of Coke. It sat on the counter for a few days but when he took it out - the rust was gone.
In the Navy we, I'm sorry, they have this really bright red imitation kool aide nicknamed bug juice. I used to drink it all the time until I saw my guys using it to soak brass firehose fittings. Takes the verdegris right off.
 

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W-P Bill said:
In the Navy we, I'm sorry, they have this really bright red imitation kool aide nicknamed bug juice. I used to drink it all the time until I saw my guys using it to soak brass firehose fittings. Takes the verdegris right off.
Mmmmm.....Sounds tasty!!
 

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Oh the Navy was full of tasty items. When your aboard ship you get to indulge yourself till your hearts content and your stomach is full of bug juice and gut bombs (aka hamburgers but I failed to find any resemblance). Kreem is another kit form of tank repair that uses phosphoric acid to clean then M.E.K. (Methyl Ethyl Keytone) to neutralize the acid and a chemical liner.

I used a form of the acid (Rust Mort) then MEK to clean some light rust in my tank then drained the MEK and poured a mix of gas/2cycle oil in to coat the tank and further protect it from rust till I was ready to use it. The mix was real heavy on the oil just for added rust protection while it was sitting around.
 

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I did the Kreem thing when addressing my previously neglected tank. To be honest with you, I wasn't too happy with the results. I swear I followed the instructions to the T, did it over the fall and winter and gave to plenty of time to allow the final coating to dry over the winter in the warmth of my house. Before the next riding season was over, I noticed it pulling away from the tank. Maybe my tank was beyond getting a premo result but I'm still riding it with the same tank and haven't had any fuel screen blockage from inside the tank. So, take that for what's it's worth.
I loved the coke and Navy suggestions, I may try the coke thing but I'd hate to scarifice a couple of my 2 liters!
I'd love to find someone that makes a plastic aftermarket tank for the KZ's and if anyone reading this can make those, make mine a 5 gal tank, although, I'm not sure I could afford to top it off these days.
 

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Gas tanks

Just completed a restoration on a 1979 Z1R MK 11 fuel tank using POR-15, worked really well, had fuel back in it 7 days later and have had no problems with any crap in the fuel filter.:cool: :cool: :cool:
 

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Just a fyi, some radiator shops will clean tanks and coat them.
 

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I am going through the same pain on my VN900C. Left the gas in there for over two years. I know I am stupid.Had some challenges in life that I never rode the bike or even thoughht about it. Two weeks ago I replaced the battery and thought I would finally take it out for a ride and it wouldn't start. Gas needle showing empty when the tank is 3/4 full. Tried to open the gas tank lid and it was caked in rust on the sides.

Emptied the gas and out of curiosity drained the gas through Mr.Funnel it had a strange smell and almost watery consistency and loads of rust and half of it was water! Looked like it was brewed coffee and coffee powder inside. Removed the fuel pump and the fuel gauge sensor and it was baked in rust. No wonder it wouldn't show the correct reading.

Removed the fuel sensor cover and saw that the variable resistor(just a coil with a moving contact from the float) was all brown and thick powdery rust. Cleaned it all and tried to test it with a multimeter and it was inconsistent. So I just hooked the gauge back to the bike's wiring and put back the odo assembly back temporarily and when I activated the float I could see the gas needle move slowly according to the float.Thank god the fuel sensor is alright and my multimeter goes to the garbage.

Next, the fuel pump looked like it was buried in mud! Removed it all and cleaned it and found out the pump is corroded beyond any redemption. Found a brand new OEM pump and filter on E bay and put it together.

Coming to the tank which is the culprit, I removed 95% of the rust with Evaporust and flushed it so many times and let it dry. But there is still a thin layer of rust on the bottom of the tank (Where the fuel pump and the gauge are). I don't want to put the pump and the gauge back on to try another session with Evaporust or vinegar etc as they are all clean and working.. So I have to get two slim pieces of wood and make covers for the holes and then soak the tank again to get all the rust out.

Lesson learnt, use only non-ethanol gas when you can or just drain the tank when not in use and spray the insides with WD-40 or something,. The fact that I overlooked or forgot about ethanol gas has taught be a good lesson. On the bright side since I got the tank out maybe I will clean the spark plug and gap it properly since access is easy. Next I also want to clean the fuel injectors!

I am going to try vinegar to remove any remaining layers of rust.Personally the fumes from Evaporust affects me for some reason.
 

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Thanks for your detailed write-up Krravi and welcome to the forums.

Many of us have suffered the pains you are going through. Lessons learned, right? Hopefully those who have not yet learned, can learn from your experience. Keep us posted.
 

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I finally got 99% of rust out of the tank and had gas mixed in with Yamaha MedRx fuel additive to prevent corrosion in the future. Put it all together and started the bike and it started. Went around for a small test ride around the area and I could see the bike starving for gas! Luckily I reached home just in time when the bike stopped. Unhooked the fuel line, turned the key on and I could see the fuel pump pushing gas out. So the rebuilt fuel pump is not the issue.

I guess I need to clean the fuel injectors which I thought would be free from rust and particles from my previous rusted tank. Apparently not. I am thinking of getting new fuel injectors but the parts diagram is so screwy. I can't seem to find the part that says "Fuel Injector" and the closest the one looks like fuel injector is "Speed Sensor" ?

 

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I removed the fuel injector connectors but the bracket is whole another story. It seems almost like welded to the plate! I have a light duty impact wrench there isn't anything I have not been able to remove. But this one is stubborn. I have a heavy duty one but I am afraid to use it. Is it thread locked? There is no way I can remove this with a screwdriver! I have it soaking in WD 40. I will try again later. But people who have removed this before, was it that hard? There is another picture with another bolt and it looks like it is welded around the seams?
 

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First off, I would throw away the WD-40 and invest in an actual can of penetrating oil. I prefer Deep Creep by the folks at Seafoam but any other dedicated penetrating oil will be far superior to WD-40. Apply Deep Creep, and while waiting, tap the head of the bolt with a bronze hammer or with a bronze or brass drift. The vibration from impact will help loosen the bolt while at the same time allowing the Deep Creep to flow deeper.

Wait 5-10 minutes and repeat the cycle.

At this point you can try to loosen the bolt by hand. If it still does not loosen, a heavy duty impact impact may work or it may just snap the bolt so save that for a last resort. Instead take a high quality allen wrench that fits the socket head tightly and if you have a suitable "cheater" pipe slide that over the end of the allen wrench for extra leverage. Now, while applying reasonable force to the cheater, tap continuously on the allen wrench as if to drive it further into the bolt. The combination of torque and vibrations should free the bolt.

If it does not give, you have a choice. Apply more cycles of oil and tapping and even an overnight soak, or give it hell with your big impact wrench.
 
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