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I have removed the axle bolts which werent that hard. Why did they torque this thing beyond belief? I will try what you said and thanks for the reply!
 

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Unless a previous owner over torqued it (which is always possible) this could be quite normal with nobody to blame.
Steel bolts have an affinity to aluminum. Over a long period of time it forms a kind of corrosion bond. You need to not only overcome the bolting torque, you need to overcome the corrosion bond torque as well.
 

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Unless a previous owner over torqued it (which is always possible) this could be quite normal with nobody to blame.
Steel bolts have an affinity to aluminum. Over a long period of time it forms a kind of corrosion bond. You need to not only overcome the bolting torque, you need to overcome the corrosion bond torque as well.
I am the original owner and this is the first time I have had to open up all this stuff. I am going to get some deep creep stuff tonight and let it soak tonight and see what happens tomorrow morning.
 

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Sounds like a plan. If you strip the socket head, we have some tricks for dealing with that. Same thing for if the bolt breaks but let's try to avoid those scenarios if at all possible
 

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Sounds like a plan. If you strip the socket head, we have some tricks for dealing with that. Same thing for if the bolt breaks but let's try to avoid those scenarios if at all possible
Appreciate your help! I would be glad to get all the help I can at this moment. Seeing my bike in tatters is kind of depressing for me. I can't wait to put it together and have it run again. I will document with pics as I go along for reference!
 

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Sounds like a plan. If you strip the socket head, we have some tricks for dealing with that. Same thing for if the bolt breaks but let's try to avoid those scenarios if at all possible
I got some SeaFoam Deep Creep and that stuff worked like magic! It removed the bolts like butter which is attached to the cylinder but the other bracket where the fuel line goes is stuck. I think since the bike is tilted to the left on the side stand, gravity is preventing the deep creep from getting into that bolt. Will tilt it right and let it soak and try again.

Removed the fuel tank and there is flash rust and some rust particles inside moving around. I guess I have to do the evapo rust again and this time I won't flush it with water but let it dry with evaporust and then spray some WD 40 inside till I get the fuel injectors installed and then fill it up with non ethanol gas.

The fuel pump got cruddy again with small pieces of rust. I have to cleaned out again.

What scares me is even if all this works when I am riding the bike suddenly stops in the middle of nowhere!
 

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Deep Creep is my go-to for any stubborn bolts.

Glad to hear it worked for you. Don't forget that on extra tough bolts, try a combination of Deep Creep and vibration. You don't need to pound the heck out of it, but get a drift or punch of some kind and rap the head of the bolt rapidly after spraying it with Deep Creep. The faster the better. With a light ball peen hammer I can do about 3 hits per second.

So I alternate with Deep Creep-hammer-wait and then repeat. The vibration helps to wick the fluid down into the threads.

FYI - I have no affiliation with Sea Foam. I just like their penetrating oil.
 

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I would install an aftermarket, see-through fuel filter so you won't be left stranded due to dirt getting to your injectors.
Keep an eye on the filter, but the filter can hold a lot more dirt than the speck that would plug an injector.
 

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I would install an aftermarket, see-through fuel filter so you won't be left stranded due to dirt getting to your injectors.
Keep an eye on the filter, but the filter can hold a lot more dirt than the speck that would plug an injector.
That seems like a great idea. The way the fuel hose(which is already short) snakes in between the two cylinders, have to figure out the right spot to cut the hose so it sits in between the cylinders and doesn't get too hot.
 

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One very important cautionary note regarding fuel filters. Make sure the filter is rated for fuel injection systems.

With the way you describe it, you may not have enough room for an after market filter. What does your primary filter look like?
 

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One very important cautionary note regarding fuel filters. Make sure the filter is rated for fuel injection systems.

With the way you describe it, you may not have enough room for an after market filter. What does your primary filter look like?
The filtration is a two step process inside the fuel pump. One is a strainer which I have many new ones and the other mesh filter which you can't see but is molded into the plastic housing of the fuel pump. I flushed it through a hole with a cleaner and blew some compressed air and it seems to be clean now.

I think once I flush the tank again and get rid of the flash rust I should be good to go. But I am way of coating the tank as there are vaccum tubes and other things inside. Tanks with a petcock would not be that hard but this is complicated. The best coating is by 3M tailored for aerospace industry but you can get a quart for bikes too. Applying that thing is a mystery.
 

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If you really want to go that way, automotive radiator service shops will clean and coat your tank for you. Last quote I got was just under $100 if I recall correctly. Might be something to consider.
 

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If you really want to go that way, automotive radiator service shops will clean and coat your tank for you. Last quote I got was just under $100 if I recall correctly. Might be something to consider.
I checked yesterday and the guy wanted $200. But, he wouldn't tell me what liner he will be using. So I am a little worried. I heard some liners just peel off and I think POR-15 is good? Not sure...
 

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Most if not all liner failures are probably from user error >> failure to properly prep the tank &/or apply the stuff correctly. I used Kreem years ago & it's still intact. Before using the kit, I did some extra common sense prep. The kit included a prep chem, but I used that as the final treatment before applying the liner. I forget, but I think I used phosphoric acid & MEK as part of the preparation. Kreem gets a bad rap because it was probably one of the most commonly used products, then used wrong by more guys.

Liner coatings. You could go with KBS, West Marine Epoxy or something from Caswell or Eastwood. Jeff.Saunders over at KZR/Z1Enterprises recommended the west marine stuff for a badly rusted tank in an old topic at KZR. Note: I don't know if resistance to ethanol would be a consideration in choosing a liner.
 

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$200 USD seems pretty steep. Have you shopped around? What is their warranty like?

I agree with Martin, lack of proper prep leads to premature failure. I recently cleaned my 1984 tank without coating it.
I never run ethanol fuel so I am not worried about ethanol related rusting. I used Enviro-wash by Rust Check. They say if you want rust prevention then let the last application of Enviro Wash, air dry instead of flushing with water. It leaves some kind of protective coating on the steel.
 

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$200 USD seems pretty steep. Have you shopped around? What is their warranty like?

I agree with Martin, lack of proper prep leads to premature failure. I recently cleaned my 1984 tank without coating it.
I never run ethanol fuel so I am not worried about ethanol related rusting. I used Enviro-wash by Rust Check. They say if you want rust prevention then let the last application of Enviro Wash, air dry instead of flushing with water. It leaves some kind of protective coating on the steel.
I called many shops and only one around my area seems to do it. When asked what liner they will be using they said they have tried many in the past and have found one that is good, but wouldn't tell me what it is! Which is fine as far as they can do it right.

Other stuff from life got on the way and I haven't had time to pursue that. But in the coming weekend I intend to continue that. Oh, btw when I was cleaning the fuel pump again, sprayed some carburetor cleaner to get out rust particles and found out that all the O rings got swollen. So I ordered a brand new pump and O'rings from Kenso. I just need the O'rings so I will have to put that back.

Regarding the liner... a simple gas tank with a petcock would be easy. But in this, I see there are two vacuum hoses in the gas tank. One inside the tank, just below the fuel filling cap and one outside the tank. I wonder how the tank liner application will keep those holes open?
 
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