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Ready for The Next Level
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Tomorrow I finally pick up my 2007 CBR1000RR I know there will be a drastic change but what can I expect when I get on? I am looking for any tips that can make the transition as smooth as possible. I may possible have to ride it home which is about 1hour and half away.
 

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frequently disturbs class
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Exponential increase in power in a much stiffer frame that's still pretty light.
Night and day difference in stopping power. Everything you do will happen bigger and faster than you're used to. Take it easy until you have a chance to get some feel for it. Go for smooth first, and fast will follow.

Enjoy your 'blade. They're great bikes.
 

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Ready for The Next Level
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
New Throttle Concerns

Thanks for the advise I plan to go really slow and easy at first, my main concern is adjusting to the throttle I am assuming it will be like when I first started on the Ninja I was really jerky until I got use to it.


Exponential increase in power in a much stiffer frame that's still pretty light.
Night and day difference in stopping power. Everything you do will happen bigger and faster than you're used to. Take it easy until you have a chance to get some feel for it. Go for smooth first, and fast will follow.

Enjoy your 'blade. They're great bikes.
 

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Alien Test Subject
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3,515 Posts
Two words: throttle control.

Don't know what you've ridden besides your 500, but that's a big jump.

Some differences you notice right off the bat:

- Ergonomics are going to be vastly different. You'll be in much more of a 'tuck' on the CBR. Even just cruising around. If your tall, you might feel like a pretzel till you get used to it. And your wrists might hurt a bit at first.

- It's gonna handle vastly different. It'll probably feel a bit 'twitchy' compared to your 500, especially at low speeds. Use a light touch at first, or you'll find yourself turning in quicker and tighter than you expect.

- And now, the power. It's got more than enough to bight you - HARD. Show it a lot of respect for the first few weeks. Snapping open the throttle will bring the front wheel sky high, in almost any gear. Be extremely smooth with it. Even moderate acceleration will plant your eyeballs into the back of your skull.

Basically you've just traded in a Honda Civic for an F1 car. Sure, they both have a steering wheel, gas and brake pedals, and four wheels, but that's about where the similarities end from the pilots point of view.

Keep the ego and testosterone in check for a while, and you should be fine.
 

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Ready for The Next Level
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
WOW thanks for making it real, now I am wondering should I even try to ride this bike home, I was thinking the basics of riding a bike are still the same. I plan to just take it easy and smooth.


Two words: throttle control.

Don't know what you've ridden besides your 500, but that's a big jump.

Some differences you notice right off the bat:

- Ergonomics are going to be vastly different. You'll be in much more of a 'tuck' on the CBR. Even just cruising around. If your tall, you might feel like a pretzel till you get used to it. And your wrists might hurt a bit at first.

- It's gonna handle vastly different. It'll probably feel a bit 'twitchy' compared to your 500, especially at low speeds. Use a light touch at first, or you'll find yourself turning in quicker and tighter than you expect.

- And now, the power. It's got more than enough to bight you - HARD. Show it a lot of respect for the first few weeks. Snapping open the throttle will bring the front wheel sky high, in almost any gear. Be extremely smooth with it. Even moderate acceleration will plant your eyeballs into the back of your skull.

Basically you've just traded in a Honda Civic for an F1 car. Sure, they both have a steering wheel, gas and brake pedals, and four wheels, but that's about where the similarities end from the pilots point of view.

Keep the ego and testosterone in check for a while, and you should be fine.
 

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I'm your Huckleberry
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3,317 Posts
Well...I made a similar exponential jump in power...from a 900 Vulcan to a ZX-14.

jaseman is absolutely correct on throttle control...you know how to do it (since you've ridden your 500 quite a bit)...but this will be far more responsive...small changes result in big power changes. Be very smooth with it. The riding position will make it worse...you'll be tempted to put all of your weight on the bars...DO NOT DO IT!!! You've got to figure out how to sit on the thing so that you aren't putting your weight on the bars...it causes all kinds of handling problems and any bump in the road will result in chopping the throttle on and off.

Be smart...take it slow. I got my '14 in June...I've accidentally lofted the front wheel once (for a split second)...thats it (even though its capable of doing it in no less than 3 gears). I still tend to slow the rate of throttle application even when getting on it...its just got so much power, I'm not willing to use it all. Requires the ultimate respect...don't forget it.

Oh...and enjoy the new ride...its incredible having a bike that responsive. Don't forget the pics when you finally get it home :toetap: :biggrin:
 

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Slow Guy on a Fast Bike
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Ive rode both. If you know how to ride...then u can ride anything
Sorry, but I gotta disagree. Overconfidence and thinking one knows it will likely end up with a one way ticket to the hospital...or worse.

Please do not think that you can give the new litrebike the same input and expect the same output as you did on your 500.

As the other guys have said, take it easy....take it real easy, and give the bike the utmost respect. Do not be scared or timid, but respect what she is capable of, or she will bit you....and hard.

Bikes like these are capable of warp speeds, in times far quicker than most people can judge or react to. And it will feel slow at a much higher speed than you are used to, so keep your speed in check.

Use you common sense, and ride with your brains and you should be just fine.

Congrats.
 

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Sorry, but I gotta disagree. Overconfidence and thinking one knows it will likely end up with a one way ticket to the hospital...or worse.

Please do not think that you can give the new litrebike the same input and expect the same output as you did on your 500.

As the other guys have said, take it easy....take it real easy, and give the bike the utmost respect. Do not be scared or timid, but respect what she is capable of, or she will bit you....and hard.

Bikes like these are capable of warp speeds, in times far quicker than most people can judge or react to. And it will feel slow at a much higher speed than you are used to, so keep your speed in check.

Use you common sense, and ride with your brains and you should be just fine.

Congrats.
i agree. but everyone is starting to scare the kid. You need to be confident when you ride. being scared is worse than being confident on a bike. I guess you need a happy medium
 

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Alien Test Subject
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3,515 Posts
None of us wanna scare you. It's just a big jump for someone with relatively little seat time. Remember, the RR liter bikes were designed with primarily one thing in mind - racing. You just need to know that you've gone "big time".

You know HOW to ride a bike. The controls all function the same. They do the same things to the bike, just with much, much more profound effects.

Healthy doses of respect, and a lot of self control, and you should be fine. You've just skipped a few steps in the learning curve.

And remember, this one goes to eleven!!
 

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I'm your Huckleberry
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3,317 Posts
Yeah...not trying to scare anyone. But its a drastic change in capabilities. I, for one, am glad to have read advice of people like jaseman, trike, and others on this forum who have ridden such powerful bikes before getting mine...I understood the respect needed for these things before ever letting out the clutch. As a result, I've survived to this point (11,000 miles on the clock).

As I said though, I still haven't pushed the bike in any sense of the word...I feel I'm still growing into this bike rather than exploiting a more friendly bike to its full potential.
 

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Navy Vet Search & Rescue
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A riding buddy of mine went from a 600 to a 1000rr this past spring. He's an experienced rider and while he's enjoyed what the new bike can and will do, he realized that he hasn't given it the respect he should. The last conversation we had this fall was that he's planning on selling or trading the 1000 before he hurts himself. He said he knows he's going to get hurt bad because of his own lack of self control and respect for the power of the bike. So like the others are saying, you shouldn't be scared or afraid of the bike but you should definitely maintain your self control and give the bike the respect it's deserves because it is a lot of power.
 

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Premium Member
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2,875 Posts
...Two words: throttle control...
And that's the first thing that has to be mastered. If you're good with the throttle on the 500R then learning the nuances of the CBR while you're riding it home isn't unrealistic; it's only an adjustment--not relearning. After all, you have to learn it at sometime, right? Get a feel for the throttle and you're on the right track, braking will become an easier task if you're controlling the throttle on the way home.

Ive rode both. If you know how to ride...then u can ride anything
I totally agree with that statement. Yes, every bike is different but if you know how to control the throttle, shift and brake, any transition can be made. I went from the 500R to the Z1000 with absolutely no problems. I only had a 10 minute ride home on the streets from the dealership at night but I rode the bike the next day over 80 miles on the treacherous LA/OC freeways with no difficulties. Yes, BMOG is going from 50 to about 150 hp max (my jump up was "only" about 70 hp), is going from an upright to an aggressive racing position (I went even more neutral), but in the end, if he can keep the bike at the right speed he'll be fine.

...Overconfidence and thinking one knows it will likely end up with a one way ticket to the hospital...or worse...
Absolutely correct, "over confidence" will get someone hurt or killed--I think that BMOG understands that.
 

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Ready for The Next Level
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thank you to all the advise that has been giving in this thread I have to admit I did not sleep well last night anxious to get my new bike but nervous because of the throttle adjustment I went through when I first got the 500. I am going into this knowing that be scared is the worst thing I can do. I know how to ride I will take my time getting to know this bike. It is really a new bike 2007 with only 2009 miles extended warranty. The guy who bought it made a promise to his self if he lived to be older than his father he would get one. He barely road it and now wants a cruiser.
 

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Ready for The Next Level
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I made it one piece thanks to the all the advice, I rode about 40 miles home in every kind of traffic situation open rode, stop and go local traffic, stop and go interstate traffic. I must say I am so thankful for what I learned on my 500R I have a smooth transition on the throttle. My wrist are killing me tho, and I am not sure where to sit on the bike closer to the gas tank or farther away. When going at at least 70 miles an hour riding more to the back felt better but in traffic sitting towards the front of the tank worked better. When I was was toward the back I was using my legs to take pressure off my arms. Pictures coming very soon!!
 

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Slow Guy on a Fast Bike
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