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There are short pipes that connect below all four carbs on my ZG1000. They appear to be carrying water from the radiotor
through the bottom of the carbs. Unfortunately one of the T pieces has broken off leaving a length behind in the carb impossible to get out. How critical is this to the carb and can it be by passed without difficulties with the carb. Many thanks for any help that you can give. mynach70
 

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I think you are referring to the carb overflow hoses. These are there to prevent an explosion and fire should the bike fall over. The hoses direct the spilled fuel away from sparks and heat of the engine. It would be wise to get it repaired as soon as possible.
 

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I think you are referring to the carb overflow hoses. These are there to prevent an explosion and fire should the bike fall over. The hoses direct the spilled fuel away from sparks and heat of the engine. It would be wise to get it repaired as soon as possible.
No, these are tubes that allow heated water to flow in a jacket in the carbs to prevent carb icing in colder weather.
 

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I must have misunderstood the OP. The OP says "through the bottom of the carb" and I don't see anything in the parts diagram to indicate any pipe or anything going through the bottom of the carb. That's why I assumed he was talking about an overflow.

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Interesting. Can't argue with that. Thanks for the correction. I never thought to check the UK models. I find it strange though; if Kawi thought the UK needed heated carbs then sure as heck Canada would have needed them even more but we did not get them. Live and learn. That's what I like about this site, I am constantly learning new stuff and enjoying the conversations.
 

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Whilst not as cold as Canada, the UK is wetter. In cold weather, the moisture in the air can cause the carbs to ice up. It only started happening when engines switched from air cooled yo water cooled.

Kawasaki resolved this on some bikes by heating the carb bodies to prevent the ice build up. Sometimes it was using water heating and on other bikes, it was electrical.
 

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Lets take this thread way off topic since the OP appears to have abandoned it anyway.

On the subject of which country is wetter, I am not sure you have any place in the UK that can beat Henderson Lake, Canada.

"Located on Vancouver Island, Henderson Lake receives more rainfall throughout the year than any other place in North America. The soggy spot receives 7296 mm of precipitation annually – over 23 feet of rainfall. What’s more, the area holds the record for the most rainfall in a year ever: a jaw-dropping 9,307mm (over 30 feet) in 1997. "

Now I have to admit that Henderson Lake is not typical Canadian weather, but we do get significant rain, snow and lots of fog in many parts of Canada.

And we are definitely a colder country. When we attempted to ride our air cooled bikes all winter, our carbs would quickly freeze up leading to all sorts of jury rigged devices to stop that. One guy glued power resistors to the sides of his carb and then ran 12 volts through them. This was back in the 1970's. I should mention that we lived in a coastal town so we did not get the dry winters like they get inland.

So I still wonder why UK and not Canada. Maybe Kawi decided to test it in the UK? I believe nowadays some of our Canadian bikes do employ water heated carbs, so perhaps it took a few years of testing. Do you still have them in the UK?
 
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