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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need to find out if it is worth doing my self(don't have tools) or send to a respected mechanic to do the work. If I send it out how much should I expect to pay for the service.
Opinions welcomed!
Thanks
 

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My hat is made of tinfoil
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I need to find out if it is worth doing my self(don't have tools) or send to a respected mechanic to do the work. If I send it out how much should I expect to pay for the service.
Opinions welcomed!
Thanks
Make, model , year, and accesories you have added, will help?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Make KZ1000 E2, 1980, no accessories have been added its pretty much stock, When I got it a year ago it didn't have the side panels, or badges, just used to get around town and go for rides once in a while.
 

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Professional motorcycle work has gotten so expensive, and sadly poorly executed, that we must now almost consider bikes as disposable appliances not worthy of the service call. Like old TVs and old fridges. However, don't throw out your classic Z. Tools and learning are great investments (as opposd to expenses) and there should be a willing person to tutor you. It all works out to fixing you own, investments with good returns, and making friends in life.
 

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If you are a little mechanically inclined then you could buy some tools and do it yourself. Also pick up a manual and study it a bit first. You would end up saving money and still have the tools when you are finished. Got my head off of my KZ900 and it's getting a valve job right now. I already honed my cylinder and replaced rings, just waiting on the head to reassemble. Good luck with yours.
 

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Old School Z-1 Tweaker
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Where do you live Traken0 ?
If you do torque down your head bolts, I would get a shop manual first, so you know what the tighten pattern is and torque in ft. lbs.
Also if your going to replace the head gasket you might as well replace the base gasket under the barrels.
Setting the cam chain timing the first time can be tricky, keep asking questions there is a lot of help out here.
Keep the old rice burners running !
How many miles are on your KZ 1000 ?
 

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I picked up an '84 GPz1100 with a blown head gasket for $750. The owner said he got quotes to have a shop replace it and decided he was better off selling the bike for what I paid him. And the bike is in other wise quite good shape.

Spent $95 on a full gasket set. I'm replacing the head and base gaskets my self. Also checking various clearances while I have it apart. I've found over the years that I end up horribly frustrated if I don't have the right tools. Something as simple as a manual impact wrench can save you hours of frustration not to mention potential broken parts (trust me on that one). I also have shop manuals for all my bikes. Another utterly indispensable tool. Also, don't be in a rush to fix it. If your going to tackle the job, take your time and do it right... though I must admit I'm still learning that one.

I'd post a picture of my GPz... but I haven't bothered to figure out how yet...

Hope this helps.
 

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Maybe?

If you are mechanically inclined and you enjoy working on engines... Then, YES.

If you can't figure you how to light your bbq with OUT lighting your eyebrows on fire ... then, Maybe not.

As far as the necessary tools, well, all you really need is a 14mm, and 10mm socket and ratchet, as well as a 7mm Allen wrench, oh yeah, You'll need a torque wrench.

If you buy the tools (about $100) and the gasket set, then you would still save lots of money.

And if you totally screw it up you can still take it to a mechanic, At least you won't have to pay for the tear down of the engine.

Take lots of pictures and keep us updated on what you decided to do
Matt-
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for all of the great encouragement, I have checked around and the max is about $1200 -$1400, this would be for the whole top end rebuilt. I think I will try and do it myself. From what I have read and heard about these engines they are pretty easy to work on. I have a Clymer manual and torque wrench, 14mm, 10mm, and a set of ratchet hex wrenches (5 - 16mm) and I have replaced the starter clutch myself so I don't have a problem tearing into the engine, I am more concerned if there is any surprises that I might find if I do it myself, compared to taking it to a mechanic. I do have some other tools and it looks like I have everything that I need tool wise after looking through the manual. What would be some problems that might come up, from some of you that have rebuilt the top end?
I am looking to work on it during my Christmas break and since it is winter then, I won't be riding it till spring so I have a while to do it and get parts. Ill post pictures when I start.
 

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KLR`s and BBQ`s
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I am in the middle of a rebuild of my 82 kz1000 and I think you will be fine. Get a full gasket set and replace the valve stem seals while you are at it. I got my head soda blasted and it looks brand new. I do recommend getting the kawasaki manual as it is really great and very descriptive
 

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9am53 it sounds like you are where I am at right now with mine. I honed my cylinder, new rings on pistons, rebuilt carbs yesterday, and now waiting on the head to come back from machine shop for a valve job. I was going to just lap the valves, but I sent it out of state. Should be hearing from him in a few days or so. I wouldn't pull the cylinder off unless I was putting a fresh hone and a set of rings in it.
 

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it would be best to retorque the head, fixes the problem of leaky seals enough of the time to make a try worthwhile.
Hi, I have tried that before with mixed results. The one thing I would like to know from someone more experienced than I is: should I loosen the head bolts then retorque them or just tighten them to specs? (My bet is to loosen first but in the past I haven't done that, too scared! Haha! Thanks! Kevin
 

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Either way should not be problem, I checked torque/tightened w/o loosening and had good results. Watch for the torque specs on some, if you have a center cam chain and there are two smaller recessed bolts in that area, the manual I had was wrong: the torque values were way too high. I think the factory manual was better, so if someone on here has that manual, then I would check with them on the sequence and torques.
 

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Either way should not be problem
Hey rocker, thx for the reply. The reason I was thinking that loosening first would be better is that it always takes some amount of force to "break" the threads free. I think this could easily be more than the torque setting, maybe much more even though the bolt could then be twisted quite a bit after break free. That has been my connundrum but in the past, like I said, I was wary of loosening the head in this manner. What you think? Thanks!
 
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