Kawasaki Motorcycle Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I tried searching before posting but really couldn't find anything.

I'm looking for heated gloves. I'm looking at these, which are pricey but the reviews are good.

http://www.gerbing.com/pages/clothing/gloves.html

Also I admit knowing little about amps/watts/voltage. I'm learning and very humble about my lack of knowledge about electrics/electronics.

Is 22 watts a lot of power being sucked out of a bikes' battery?

Any opinoins greatly appreciated

Suresh
PS. 32 Degrees F here in BOS tonight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
I've been checking out Gerbing's products also lately and found this information on their website:

Gerbing website said:
Electrical Draw
Having your heated clothing run at optimal levels depends in part on the health of your electrical system.

If you have a problem, first check all connections for tightness and wires for proper routing and insulation integrity. Also check the fuse.
Some motorcycles' charging systems do not put out full power when the rpm's drop, such as when in town or idling. You may wish to turn down the heat when you come into town.
Other accessories use up electrical power needed to power your heated clothing. Add up your power needs and subtract them from your alternators peak power output (available from your dealer). For example, if the bike puts out 280 watts, and 130 watts are needed to run the bike, then 150 watts remain. There is plenty of power for a Gerbing's jacket or jacket liner at 77 watts.
Go find out what your bike puts out versus how much it uses.

I also found this. It might be helpful because it will give you a rough idea of how extra long batteries will last (ones not connected to your bike's system).

Gerbing website said:
Portable Batteries
Most of our customers for over the last 20 years have been motorcyclists. Riders can easily connect our clothing to their bike's electrical system and ride warm. The good news is that battery technology has advanced so that now our clothing can be connected to portable batteries.

For carrying with you, we recommend sealed, maintenance free, rechargeable batteries such as manufactured by Globe Union or Interstate Batteries. For $30 or less you can purchase one of these batteries, and for only about another $30 purchase a battery charger.

The bigger the battery, the more power. The capacity of a battery is measured by the number of amps the battery provides per hour. For example, Interstate Batteries makes the following 12 volt batteries:

13.7 lb battery (JC12150) that provides 15 amp hours

8.8 lb battery (PC12100) that provides 10 amp hours

5.7 lb battery (PC1270) that provides 7 amp hours.

How much power do you need? There is no precise answer to this question because how much additional heat you need from our clothing depends on the outside temperature, the clothes you are wearing, and the amount of heat you need before you feel warm. As a guideline, our gloves require 1.8 amps per hour. That means that the light 5.7 lb battery powers our gloves continuously for a little under 4 hours. Our socks also generate 22 watts, and our vest generates 44 watts by itself. So gloves and socks together, or a vest by itself, require 3.6 amps per hour. A continuous power drain heating gloves and socks, or heating a vest, will exhaust the 5.7 lb battery in a little less than 2 hours.

Unfortunately, the battery capacity decreases in very cold weather, so around 0 degrees Fahrenheit the light 5.7 lb battery may heat the gloves for only 3 hours or under and the gloves and socks for less than an hour and a half. On the plus side, the power drain need not be continuous. At full power, our heated clothing keeps motorcyclists warm at temperatures down into the teens, and that includes the effect of wind chill. So the power can be switched off and on, or our optional portable thermostat can be used to dial in the amount of heat needed to reduce the overall power draw.

The bottom line is that in cold weather, wearing either our heated vest or our heated gloves and socks, the best solution for most people is probably a battery in the 9 to 14 lb range. The capacity of these batteries in even cold weather would provide heat right through an entire football game. If only wearing gloves or socks, the 5.7 lb battery may be sufficient.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,159 Posts
gees

IF I had a question about heated gloves I'd call somplace like our Fourm Sponsors at Beartooth Kawasaki in Red Lodge, Montana...someplace that knows about snowmobiles...Power equals Current times Amps (P=IE) If your bike is running then you shouldn't have any problem with heated gloves...period. They do make battery operated heated gloves, thermo glove liners as thin as nylons, and you can do a lot of searching through the hunting stores as well. I would think that they would be chaeper (less expensive than a snowmobile shop) but ask Beartooth Kawasaki hte call is absolutely free 800-556-3098.
 

·
Official BTK Forum Pot Stirrer
Joined
·
37,387 Posts
I will attest to the professionalism at Beartooth. I have ordered twice from that fine establishment with absolutely no regrets.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,267 Posts
Hmm...let's try that formula quoted above again.

Power = Current times VOLTS (P=IE)

So, at 22 watts, your current draw will be around 1.83 amps (pretty low) and it won't take much of a wire size to handle it.

As a previous writer said, you need to know how much your bike's charging system is producing and how much you are using with ignition, lights, etc. What is left you can use to support the auxiliaries like gloves, jacket, CD, wide-screen TV...ha...

T-man
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,245 Posts
Something I might recommend.

heated grips instead of heated gloves.

I have some dual-star heated grips on my ex500. They are wonderful, 'low' and 'high' setting and keeps my hands toasty even into the single digits.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,159 Posts
Staduim Gell Seat

I have a Gell seat taht you toss in the microwave for 4 minutes. When I go out to start the van in the winter, I toss it in the wifes seat so that when she gets in it's toasty warm...then I can use it as her side is already warmed up. About the time we get to the Service station half way into town we stop for my coffee and my seat is warm as well...I've seen the gell insert gloves and I have also seen the microfiber (almost like nylons) glove liners....still the Vanson Gauntlets over the summer gloves keep my hands warm...at least they did in New England from R.I. to ME. and back.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top