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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 90 ZX750 was leaking fuel from the carb area before I moved to Florida. After doing some research, it seems that I may have a stuck float so I decided to order a rebuild kit and take off all the carb bowls to check the floats.

Does anyone with experience with this bike have any tips on getting the carb bowls out, or even taking the carbs out completely? I have a set of off-set ratchet wrenches and I can get the screws out for the left most bowl, but I cannot get any of the other screws out due to the extremely limited clearance.

I have all of the fairings off and the tank removed, but I cannot figure out how to do this at all. Please help, I cant believe that this is this difficult. Any particular tools I should be using to make my life easier?

I tried following the haynes manual for my bike to get the carbs out completely but the book doesnt quite match up. I cant figure out how to get the airbox out in order to get to the carbs..

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
yeah thats what i figured even though the manual i had said to do otherwise. Thats when I realized that Kawasaki sold me the manual for the zx750H1, not the ZX750F4 (750 R), so that explains some of my issues. I ordered the right manual and hopefully it will help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
So I finally got the carbs out, basically I had to really muscle them out to get them clear of the boots for the airbox and the engine. Does anyone have any tips to make getting these things out any easier, especially since I do not want to damage the boots in the future. With very little clearance the boots were getting pretty mangled as I wrestled to get the carbs out.

Thanks for the help.
 

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I'm not familiar with that particular model, but for most bikes, if you can remove the airbox connector tubes first, removing the carbs is much easier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
help installing this time...

So does anyone have any tips for putting these things back in? The boots are pretty soft, but the problem is clearance again. I just cannot got the carbs to line up with both the crankcase boots and the airbox boots. It just seems like I am mashing the boots on both sides and risking tearing something. I have considered just getting rid of the airbox and replacing it with K&N pods but that seems to come with its own problem such as rejetting and making sure I plug all the vacuum lines, etc. etc. which I am not sure that I am totally up to doing.

Is there a lube or grease I should be using to do this or is it just muscle it in and hope to get them lined up? Or is there a recommended tool I can use to pull the boots out and around the carbs? I tried a screwdriver but I am worried about either tearing the boots or damaging the carbs.

Once again any help would be appreciated.
 

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Navy Vet Search & Rescue
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On some bikes, it's easier to push the airbox boots back inside the airbox and install the carbs into the manifolds first. Then install the airbox boots one at a time starting with the 2 inboard carbs(2&3) before doing the outboard(1&4). Some people have reported a small hand size is very useful for this. On others (mine for 1) once you get the carbs into the manifolds, use a small bladed screwdriver, to help get the airbox tubes to slide up over the edge of the carbs. Again, be sure to do the inboard carbs first. It's similar to the way you would use a tire iron when manually mounting a tire on a rim if you've ever done that. The next time I break the tip of one of my small screwdrivers, I'm going to heat it with a torch and bend a 90 near the end and use as a tool just for this purpose. Once you figure out what method works best for your bike, it's really not that bad of a job when working with soft boots. I can put mine back on from start to finish in about 15 minutes now, and that's including fuel line, clamps, and cable being installed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the reply. I will try using a small screwdriver to pry the boots. I heard that putting a little vaseline on the boots will help ease the carbs in and make the job much easier. Would the vaseline cause any issues?
 

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I don't think the vaseline would hurt the rubber but along with making the rubber slip "on" easier, it will also make them able to slip "off" easier and that might happen while your out riding so It might not be a good idea. Besides that, you shouldn't need it if you get the edge of the boot around the carb which sounds like the problem your having.
 
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