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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I'm having a serious issue with my 99 lakota.
The other day I went to go for a ride and when I put it in gear it stalled out in gear for whatever reason, now it will not go back into neutral, when trying to get it out of gear a friend and myself pushed the quad back and fourth and I managed to get the gears to shift all the way up to 5th but going back down it shifted really soft into 2nd and will not get to 1st or neutral.
So I decided to tear apart the engine, I'm reading the Clymers manual to check for things that may be wrong, I'm thinking possibly the shifter and the star gear that shifts the gears might not be connecting correctly. to even look at that I have to remove both the primary and secondary clutches.
The Clymers manual tells me to remove the primary by first removing the recoil starter and hold the rotor bolt to unscrew the clutch bolt. When I tried that the rotor bolt broke loose, so I decided to try to hold the rotor still and that is spinning. So now both of those ideas/methods have failed and I'm plum out of ideas on how to get that nut loose, then I'll have the same issue with the nut on the secondary clutch. According to Clymers the clutch nut is torqued to 107 ftlbs the only other thing I can think of is jamming the sprockets but that's not an option cause they will more than likely break a tooth or more.

Anyone have any ideas on what I can try to do? The way it's looking now the bike is done

Thanks
 

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The trick is to stick a penny in the teeth while also having a friend hold the alternator rotor. The penny will deform to cover a tooth or two and won't break anything out. Also, try an impact gun to snap the nut loose. Other than that, you could try taking it to an automotive repair shop and throwing $10 at one of the mechanics to use a much larger and more powerful impact gun that will probably pop the nut off without holding anything else...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Great, thank you.
Worked out pretty good.
I got everything torn apart and the clutches put back together unfortunately I think I might have to take it all apart again. it seems the shift drum (star gear) is not moving at all now, as it was earlier. I was able to turn it by hand and now it'll only go in reverse and neutral, anyone have some advice for me before tearing it all down again tomorrow?

Thank you
 

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Ok, with the clutches removed (I know you just dot done putting them back on) you need to have a friend turn the transmission input shaft while you try to run through the gear pattern. The more parts you remove (shift shaft, return spring, retaining collar) the better look you can get at the actual shift drum while trying to turn it the better you can see if something outside of the transmission is binding up.

If you remove all of the goodies, turn the input shaft, and try to shift through the pattern and it won't do it, it's probably something wrong inside the transmission. If there is something going on with the shift drum/shifter shaft/shift forks, you'll have to remove the top end and split the cases to access the transmission parts.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
You were supposed to give me good news :mrgreen:

I actually got it to shift again, I had to rock the quad back and fourth. It was sorta doing that prior to me tearing it all down. If it was running I had to rev the engine slightly to get it out of neutral into either 1st or reverse.

I'm kinda stumped, everything looked OK and measured out, all the springs were strong and nothing with the shifter was worn or bent. Maybe my shifting issue is further in the transmission. Actually there was one thing I found worn; the shoes inside the primary clutch hub, there were a few nicks on every pad and the very ends of the rear sides were worn away. For almost $300 I'm not gonna worry about it for the time being.
Prior to the day of me tearing it down I never had any sort of slipping, everything went smooth except for the quirkiness of trying to get it into 1st or reverse. On the day it broke down it hung between 2nd and 3rd while doing figure 8's in the mud, I stopped playing for a second and dropped it back down into 1st, ran fine the rest of the day until I shut her down to grab a drink and put some air in the tires.
Starting to sound like a Chevy lol
 

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It's possible that the bronze bushing inside of the primary clutch hub is worn to the point that it's dragging on the crankshaft thus turning the hub even when the shoes are not engaged.

It's also possible that someone used the incorrect oil in the engine at some time at covered all of the secondary clutch discs with gunk causing the secondary clutch to drag as well.

That would result in the transmission not wanting to shift into certain gears or at particular times because the engine is loading the drive dogs inside the transmission.

By the same token it's also much more likely that the previous owner abused the crap out of it including neutral drops and bent/ damaged shift forks and that's causing the problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
"It's possible that the bronze bushing inside of the primary clutch hub is worn to the point that it's dragging on the crankshaft thus turning the hub even when the shoes are not engaged."
How can I tell ? the hub is turning like it should when turning by hand. the outer part moves counter clockwise and not clockwise, or at least not easily

"By the same token it's also much more likely that the previous owner abused the crap out of it including neutral drops and bent/ damaged shift forks and that's causing the problem."
No doubt, bought it for $400 a couple months ago, put maybe $300 more in it bearings, oil, automotive off road lights, breaks, misc junk. up until now it's actually been a pretty good bike, I think I've got $700 worth of fun out of it so far.

Not to bad of a deal for a starter bike for sure.
 

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Grab the primary clutch hub with the nut on it to tighten it down and try to rock the hub against the outside of the crankshaft. If you can move the hub around without the clutch shoes moving then the bushing is worn and probably dragging.
 

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If you have material missing from the fiber clutch plates to the point that you can see the underlying steel, they will bind when you try to adjust the clutch to the proper setting. What happens is they flex and bow the friction faces into the steels. So, replace any worn frictions.

Then pay particular attention to the three balled eccentric actuator at the bottom of the clutch parts diagram on Kawasaki.com. That relies on a fixed post bolted to the transmission case, and careful adjustment of part #92009 to set the correct amount of free play so the clutch will release when the shifter actuates the release cam. If the fixed post is missing the clutch will not release, same thing happens if the adjustment of part #92009 is incorrect.

If the shift linkage is improperly installed such that the clutch release does not engage the actuation cam, or that cam is missing, part #13118, same thing, locked from shifting.

Lastly, use of automotive oil will lock up old frictions by causing them to swell or gum up. Make sure you are using an oil rated for motorcycle wet clutches.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
careful adjustment of part #92009 to set the correct amount of free play so the clutch will release when the shifter actuates the release cam.
I've wondered what that did, I've adjusted it to the specs in the service manual but it never really seemed to do anything.
 
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