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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I own a Kawasaski 2009 Ninja 250R, recently I laid it down and since then the rear brake feels sa if there is no pressure on it until i pumpit a couple times. then it gets pressure and as soon as i start riding it loses all pressure and im forced to pump it again to build back up the pressure. Does anyone know what i can do?
I've bleed the brakes already in attempt to get the air out of the line but it didn't seem to work.
Does anyone have any idea on how i can fix this?
 

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Navy Vet Search & Rescue
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You've still got air in the system. Some times it can be very difficult to get all the air out. You could buy one of the vacuum systems like mightyvac (sp) to do it or there are other methods like using a section of line and a jar that are cheaper. I use the jar/line method when I'm bleeding brakes solo.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
well i was told that it might be a leaking seal on one of the lines if that were to be the case then does anyone know where the seals are located? At that when you bleed the brake line how long does it usually take?
 

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Navy Vet Search & Rescue
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"Seals" are copper washers that are on each side of the banjo fittings. If the seal's are leaking, you should see fluid dripping out while you have pressure on the pedal. Depending on how bad a leak is, you may be able to feel the pedal gradually going down if you maintain pressure on it.

There is no set time that it takes to bleed brakes. If it's the run of mill job and all goes well it's pretty fast. If it's got air bubbles trapped in it then it can be a real pain to get them out and take and extended amount of time. When I installed stainless lines on my bike, it only took about 5 min to bleed the rear but it took me over an hour to get all the air out of the front.
 

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Don't mean to interrupt, but there are more than just copper seals on the rear brake system if you have a rear disc: the brake line from actuator to the fluid reservoir is held on with cheap hose clamps, may be a problem place. You should see leaking fluid somewhere though.

Maybe the reservoir cap is loose or broken: no fluid loss, but might cause a pressure problem....

Bleeding can take time, but I would look at the other part of the equation just to see what it looks like. Should not take any time at all.
 

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Navy Vet Search & Rescue
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Maybe the reservoir cap is loose or broken: no fluid loss, but might cause a pressure problem....
I know I haven't seen every thing in this world, but I've never seen a brake system that was designed to have any pressure in the reservoir. They've all been gravity feed to the piston/chamber where the pressure is generated. That's the reason you only see clamps on the hoses and not a pressure fitting on the line that connects a remote reservoir.
 

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GHOSTRIDER
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"Seals" are copper washers that are on each side of the banjo fittings. If the seal's are leaking, you should see fluid dripping out while you have pressure on the pedal. Depending on how bad a leak is, you may be able to feel the pedal gradually going down if you maintain pressure on it.

There is no set time that it takes to bleed brakes. If it's the run of mill job and all goes well it's pretty fast. If it's got air bubbles trapped in it then it can be a real pain to get them out and take and extended amount of time. When I installed stainless lines on my bike, it only took about 5 min to bleed the rear but it took me over an hour to get all the air out of the front.
+1:wink:My front brakes took awhile too.Im going for the hand pump method this time because the air wants to rise and refilling the system through the bleeders on each caliper supposed to force the air and old fluid up and out to the reservoir. Caution!!! You must remove the old fluid from the reservoir as it refills so no dripping or spilling of fluid on the paint occures!:eek:Most bike shops or auto parts stores have the crush washers for the banjo fittings.
 
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