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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have purchased a Kawasaki ZZR1200 with only 3495 miles on it. It is a very dark blue. I have lowered the suspension 1" with a Soupy's lowering it kit and have fabricated a new muffler system, as those nuclear reactor canisters just weight too much. I have also modified it with a pair of '03 ZX9R front disc brake calipers, and am installing Galfer Stainless steel Braided front brake lines. I have a new set of Pirelli's. I just need to sync the carbs, as the previous owner had them rebuilt, but they seem to be out of sync. I also put a set of Genmar Risers on it to get the bars up a little higher.

This bike sat a long time, as the person who purchased it as his first bike was 6' 4" inches tall and thought the bike fit him well. Apparently it scared the hell out of him, and I came across it at the right time last year. I got it for $2800 bucks, which I though was a good deal. It has some little dings here and there, but really looks good. I have many years riding and working on bikes, in and out of dealerships, and this bike is truly a Gem. I live in Connecticut, on the new York border, upstate, with access to some of the best riding roads in New England/New York. I'll post some pictures of the bike soon.

I had joined ZZRBikes, but due to a computer crash lost my password, and their recaptcha verification is not working properly. Kind of sucks, as I liked that forum, but have no way of getting back in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks! I took a Radiant exhaust, cut off the exhaust cans, left the long exhaust pipes , I cut them right at the front of the exhaust cans, used a baffle insert and wrapped that with ceramic cloth. I put a 2" clamp around 4' inches long to attach the Radiant exhaust pipe tips to that and spot welded the baffle on the inside. All in all I knocked about 40 lbs. off of the bike. I have a small machine shop and various welders, so it came out pretty clean I'll try and post some pics, I have the bike wrapped up right now as it is stored for winter, and it's still on my trailer. I'll post pics soon, it is still really cold up here in Connecticut. It hit 60 degrees, then dropped down to 18 degrees the next day. thanks for the welcome. (seems that my keyboard is on the blitz, I just built this computer, aaaargh!) :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Bugs and Daffy are the best!! Here are a couple of pics. The Nissin Calipers and STeel Braided lines will be put on in a couple of weeks, when weather alllows. My Barn is full with my other bike, and an '73 MG Midget I'm restoring. In this pic you can see the exhaust modification I have made. It's hard to see the bike sits an inch lower. It's really dust/dirty, but cleans up well. That engine side cover has a weird wearing on it. I may take if off and repaint it, or drive it for 20K miles then do it. :)

Wheel Tire Vehicle Fuel tank Automotive lighting
Tire Wheel Land vehicle Fuel tank Automotive fuel system
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The Radiant exhaust tips usually mount on the bottom of the headers but I thought by putting a baffle, and a ceramic stuffing, and leaving the long pipes on, I could quiet it down a bit, and still have something not so huge. :)
 

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Thanks! I took a Radiant exhaust, cut off the exhaust cans, left the long exhaust pipes , I cut them right at the front of the exhaust cans, used a baffle insert and wrapped that with ceramic cloth. I put a 2" clamp around 4' inches long to attach the Radiant exhaust pipe tips to that and spot welded the baffle on the inside. All in all I knocked about 40 lbs. off of the bike. I have a small machine shop and various welders, so it came out pretty clean I'll try and post some pics, I have the bike wrapped up right now as it is stored for winter, and it's still on my trailer. I'll post pics soon, it is still really cold up here in Connecticut. It hit 60 degrees, then dropped down to 18 degrees the next day. thanks for the welcome. (seems that my keyboard is on the blitz, I just built this computer, aaaargh!) :)
A friend with a machine shop and welder is a friend indeed if within an hour away :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
It would be great to find biker friends who with to share the biking experience, and not try too mooch off of the equipment and tooling I have. I have helped more people than I can remember, I also had an electronics repair shop for over 10 years, so my "generosity" was super extended in that field also. I rarely got that reciprocated though. and when I needed something, virtually all the people I helped by welding parts and sections of their cars to get them through motor vehicle, or computers and T.V.'s I've fixed, etc., coutnless motorcycles I got going again, and I am not a "tit for tat' type person, but I have learned by how people disappear, it's not worth it. Ironically people who have paid me to fix stuff nobody would touch, have helped me, and I've had better luck with. These days, maybe because I'm older, 64 years old, I find it difficult to find more mature people who can ride with me, keep up with me, and have the maturity to maintain friendships. My long term friends, 20 + years have died, and I have not met anyone that I could really call a friend. I am married with a 21 year old son. I am devoted to my family. Younger people, undertsandably, if they are single are off chasing woemen, or in relationships that need caring. I'm just at an awkward age where I find myself being quite a loner. I didn't plan this, but that's how it ended up. :)
 

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It would be great to find biker friends who with to share the biking experience, and not try too mooch off of the equipment and tooling I have. I have helped more people than I can remember, I also had an electronics repair shop for over 10 years, so my "generosity" was super extended in that field also. I rarely got that reciprocated though. and when I needed something, virtually all the people I helped by welding parts and sections of their cars to get them through motor vehicle, or computers and T.V.'s I've fixed, etc., coutnless motorcycles I got going again, and I am not a "tit for tat' type person, but I have learned by how people disappear, it's not worth it. Ironically people who have paid me to fix stuff nobody would touch, have helped me, and I've had better luck with. These days, maybe because I'm older, 64 years old, I find it difficult to find more mature people who can ride with me, keep up with me, and have the maturity to maintain friendships. My long term friends, 20 + years have died, and I have not met anyone that I could really call a friend. I am married with a 21 year old son. I am devoted to my family. Younger people, undertsandably, if they are single are off chasing woemen, or in relationships that need caring. I'm just at an awkward age where I find myself being quite a loner. I didn't plan this, but that's how it ended up. :)
Have you tried Facebook? I shut down my account for reasons but maybe someone here can look in your area and forward meet-up rides etc. In the 90's I used to ride with an "any bike" group on Sundays, it was really cool. We would meet at an independent bike shop early to adjust chains and air pressure then ride from San Antonio to Bandera on Hwy 16 for breakfast then tour the Texas Hill Country back before the ranchers sold off to developers. I really REALLY miss it :( I learned so much about maximizing the capability of my CB750F then FJ1200 riding behind the amateur road racers on the Gixxers and ZXs. After some miles the leaders would stop to gather everyone else up, take a head count, and continue on.

Anyway I know what you mean about doing free work, I had a friend with equipment like yours that I learned lathe, milling, mics, and welding on.

Again welcome. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I was well known in this area as I worked in many of the motorcycle shops as the parts manager. My other bikes are a 1975 CB400F (now a Yoshima 458cc X4, Gold anodized wheels, D.I.D. aluminum rims, hand bent pipe by Kazio Yoshima himself, (he also turned my carbs into smooth bores), I purchased that bike new in 1976. I still have this bike. I also have a 1983 GS750ES, which I also purchased new. I still have that too. Never had to do a thing to that bike except ride it and do maintenance. It has 42K miles on it and runs very strong. I always had dealer bikes, so I didn't need to ride my bikes much. I got out of the business and continued with machining, programming, and designing tooling for CNC machines, then got into electronics. I have a strong CAD background, and was doing it before it was taught. I learned 3,4,and 8 axis CNC machines on the fly as in that era, there were no schools for it. I'm kind of a private person these days, which why I end up riding alone. At my age a lot of people I know are riding Harley's and just ride too **** slow and don't wear helmets, and since I ride a lot in New York, (and personally won't ride with anyone not suited up), well, that kind of thins the crowd. It always makes me laugh when I see someone on a 600cc to 1000cc bike with shorts and sneakers on. They've obviously have never slid out. I think people in your part of the country and just friendlier. Connecticut is really a snooty little state. I have lived here my whole life, so I can say that with much confidence. It seems like every other state I have visited has nicer people. They don't have the crazy New England roads though.. My house has doubled in price, and I can't really afford to live in this state. I don't know what the kids I see around are going to do as the homes are so damned expensive, and the wages don't match. Babbling on now. :)
 

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You sure sound like a sensible person, except for the motorcycle riding stuff.
I mean what kind of an idiot rides a motorcycle these days? FFS, risky as taking the poison jab.
Have you seen the latest documentation on the adverse reactions?
Have you even heard of Kawasaki disease? Not something you'd want to catch that's for sure.

Just joking. Keep on riding. No fear.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I have to agree with your assessment. 30 years ago, this part of New England was motorcycle heaven. There were no cops around, and the few that were around never bothered going after fast bikes. There so much fewer cars. None of the many houses, and housing developments, where people in half a million houses create rich people ghettos, and demand 20 miles around them be policed, has really made for crappier riding. On the other hand, some of the roads I ride on have not changed in the last 30 years, except for being repaved. There's one section of back roads that for 9 miles has no stop signs, no traffic, and very few roads coming out of the sides. You can have a lot of fun on that road, and it goes up to the top of a mountain ridge line, and down back the other side. Upstate Connecticut, where I'm at and the section of new York next to it has some of the best riding country I've ever been out. Dotted with quaint little villages, that are still middle class, and lots of great places to eat, you can easily just ride around for 200 miles and never leave your neighborhood. I guess this is still a great area for riding, you just can't go south. Riding south even 5 miles puts you into traffic hell. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Here are pics of them mounted to a spare set of forks, confirming that the 02-03 NISSIN Calipers are 63mm space on calipers and forks. I posted this in another thread to show a new member. I will post all new pic of my bike in this thread henceforth. :)

Motor vehicle Bicycle part Automotive exhaust Rim Machine
Sleeve Yellow Personal protective equipment Font Metal
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I have almost finished my bike shed. I just finished the roof. This town will not allow such structures on concrete slabs, so I had to put it of pavers, with 10' inches deep on crushed stone underneath. There are five such mounts under each floor joist, on 16" centers, the floor seems really solid, Two layers of 5/8ths treated plywood for the floor. The panels are double layer argon filled French Door structural panels, on front and the side. The roof is steel. 50 year warranty, 75 year life expectancy, so I'll be long gone when they need replacing. Almost done, May have to tarp off parts till spring, it's freakin' cold up here. It looks crooked because the lawn is and my camera work didn't help. but it's plumb. It's 10'x12', the largest the town would allow. :)

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Property Sky Plant Building Wood
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
That "baker" scaffold has been a live saver. The pump jacks in the back are probably 50 years old. It should give a lot of natural light to work in. I plan on having a separate set of tools for my motorcycles, and small engines in there. I have way too many tools. Quadruples of everything, even more of some. My wife thinks I'm parking my lawn tractors in there, right. HahaHa! :)
 
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