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My mule is a 1998- 2500 w/v-twin 617 cc. I recently did a compression check and found one side at 230psi and the other at 270 psi. I will have to verify it with another gauge but I 'm fairly certain its accurate.My manual says it should be somewhere betweem 145 and 220 psi.(usable range)
My manual says it could be faulty oil rings and/or carbon build up on top of the piston.The mule runs great for the most part. I am in the middle of servicing it, mainly repairing an overheating problem and rebuilding the carb. It wasn't smoking at all so I'm thinking the rings are good. It does have a problem trying to fire and stay running when its cold., but works well when warmed up. I'm banking on the carb rebuild to fix that.My question would be, Is there a product I can mix in the fuel to dissolve carbon build up and not destroy anything else? Any thoughts or
suggestions are greatly appreciated.
 

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It does not sound as if you have an mechanical engine issues with the rings or valves, but do take the time to set your valves. Valves should be set at least once a year.

Regarding your cooling issue, do not run it long enough to get the heads warm to touch if the coolant is not circulating through the radiator. Running it anyway will warp one or both heads - guaranteed!

If you are careful and do the carbon removal job outside, you can use SeaFoam to clear carbon deposits. It is not for the faint of heart or in a neighborhood full of tree huggers. What you do is remove your spark plugs and dump about two tablespoons of SeaFoam into each spark plug hole. Then let it set overnight after you have rolled the engine over a couple of times by hand with the key off.

The next day, ground your spark plugs with the leads attached so you do not blow your igniter or coil, and spin the engine with the starter long enough to blow out the excessive Seafoam. You will paint the garage ceiling with carbon and oil if you do this inside, also good for spraying the side of the house if you are not well away from everything.

Then put a shot of ether starting fluid down each spark plug hole, install the spark plugs and start it up and let it run at a fast idle.

It will smoke up the county, so be prepared!

As it runs, take the remainder of that can of SeaFoam and pour it through the carburetor slow enough it does not kill the engine as it runs. More smoke, but that breaks up the carbon and spits it out the exhaust.

Then add a can of SeaFoam to the gasoline, and change your oil and filter.

Run it as usual, and the excess carbon will all be gone in short order.

As for your carburetor, the 2500 series have a very simple carburetor that seldom needs parts. Usually they just need a complete cleaning and disassembly, and the internal carburetor body passages cleaned (sometimes with a very fine wire), and then blown out with a can of starting fluid - NOT NEAR A FLAME or you will go whoosh and get an expensive hair cut! Do not use air from a compressor to dry anything in the carburetor. If you have to use air, use the canned air for a camera. Higher pressures will damage the carburetor by blowing out body plugs.

Go to Kawasaki.com and print out the parts diagrams for your carburetor and keep track of the parts as you take it apart. Take it all apart, including all the jets or you will not get the crud out!

Use a high quality non-foaming liquid carburetor cleaner that is in a pressure can. Avoid you eyes and any modern polycarbonate eyeglasses (carb cleaner eats eyeglass lenses). Use some sort of eye protection, it also eats corneas!

Then reassemble and set the pilot air screw around 2 turns out from very lightly bottomed. Do not adjust the float lever unless you know you have a float level problem. Usually it is necessary to replace the float valve if they have a wear ring around the tapered tip. The float valve seat is not replaceable, so do not even try.

Reinstall the air cleaner connections, as you want that working to set the pilot air screw.

The pilot air screw has a plastic plug/cap over the top, toss that in the junk unless you have an active Communist Cell or other subversive Environmental Whacko group checking on you. After you get it running, warm it completely and set the idle to a fast idle with the idle screw (about 1,800 rpm), then adjust the pilot air screw so the engine runs its best and sounds the best - that may be in a half turn or out a half turn, the engine sound will let you know. When that is done back the idle screw down to a comfortable idle, and you are done.
 
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